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Full text of "Business screen magazine"

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\mUM BUYER'S GUIDE ISSUE OF QUALIFIED FIL/U PRDDUrERS 
IMUMRER DIME • VOLUME 14 • 1955 • DIME DOLLAR 




Atlas FACILITIES for businessisponsored film production are complete, under 
one roof, and up-to-the-minute -fith the latest advancements in practical filmic 
equipment. 

These comprehensive production facilities reflect another important aspect 
of Atlas Filmaturity gained ytiuring forty consecutive years of specialized pro- 
duction of films that advertise, sell, train and educate. 

In addition to being tlie oldest producer of business films in America, Atlas 
is also among the most raodern and complete in facilities and equipment. 

We invite you to loAk in on us and judge for youise\i/&J_^i\. 



CONSULTATION WITHOUT OBLIGATION 

ATLAS FILM CORPORATION 

Producers of Quality Motion Piclurei, Sound SlideHlm%, Theatrical Shorts, TV Commercials 

ESTABLISHED 1913 

lin SOUTH BOULEVARD • OAK PARK, ILLINOIS • CHICAGO PHONE: AUSTIN 7-8620 



* the wealth of mature filn 



skill and judgemenl achieved only through many years of actual production expe 



54 52555 



Formula 



for Maintaining Top -Flight 
Employee Relations 



A GREAT NEW ENGLAND manufacturing company has never lost 
an hour due to a strike. In more than three quarters of a cen- 
tury! Sales for 1952 will probably top $125,000,000. Growth in 
sales AND earnings are impressive. 

We asked the president of this company how he accounted for so 
fine a record. Here in essence is his explanation . . . 

"Our company has made progress because of teamivork 
all along the line and our constant effort to keep all mem- 
bers oj our organization thoroughly informed of our 
plans, and to give them an opportunity to participate in 
making and carrying out those plans." 

We agree that teamwork IS the key . . . and full information IS 
essential to effective participation. And while we can claim no 
credit in this instance, we know of no better way to keep all mem- 
bers of an organization thoroughly informed as to policies, activ- 
ities and plans than through the medium of motion pictures. 

We make motion pictures that do precisely that; and thcv help tre- 
mendously to build morale. We will gladly outline a practical way 
to embark on a motion picture program, all without the slightest 
obligation. Write or telephone today. 



CARAVEL 



730 FIFTH AVENUE 




FILMS, INC 



NEW YORK 'TEL. CIRCLE 7-6110 



/f 



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Over ten years o( experience and Ihousands of TSI 
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try ond sales. 

NOTE THESE EXCLUSIVE FEATURES! 

Self-Contained Magazine Pro|ection 



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magazine holds 
800 feet (22 min.) 
black and white or 
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Standard projection on any conven 

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Using 2000-foot (55 min.) 
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Bell & Howell or DeVry Models 
TSI "Suitcase" Projectors ore furnished with Bell & 
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Easy to carry custom cose size meosures M' x 22' 
X 12" — opproximately 40 pounds. 

Write todoy for Ulustrated brochures featuring 
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Technical 
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— Dept. C-2 — 

30865 Five Mile Road 
PLYMOUTH, MICHIGAN, U.S.A. 



H I S I N E S S SCREEN MAGAZINE 

PRIIIlllCTIfl^ REVIEW 

THE II II \ Mr S (i U I I) F V W I 'I o :J 



Issue I • \ oliime 14 

P R E V I E \^ OF CONTENTS 

Trends in the News of Business Films 16 

Business Adapts Stereo Stills by Ray Vicker 18 

Television in the News 36 

Business Film Production Survey; Statistical Summary 52 

Production Review: The Film in 1952 53 

Among the Outstanding Films of 1952 54 

Winners of Awards and Film Festival Honors 55 

New Business Tool: The TelePrompTer 112 

Progress in Medical Films by Ralph Creer 106 

Canadian Film Production During 1952: A Review 113 

Film GM Motorama in Record Time 114 

Third Annual Production Review Section 

An Alphabetical Index to Business Film Producers 56 

Geographical Index to Business Film Producers 57 

Listings of 170 L. S. and Canadian Film Producers 58 

Business Screen Editorial Departments 

In the Picture Parade 96 

Commercial Newsreel: News About Pictures 100 

People Who Make Pictures: Personality Notes 102 

Case Histories of New- Films 108 

(also see Pages 110, 120, 121, 122, 124) 

New Products: News of Audio Visual Equipment 125 

Plus: The National Directory of Visual Education Dealers 




Office of Publication: 7064 Sheridan Road, Chicago 26 

O. H. Coelln. Jr.. Editor Everett Davis. Art Director 

Kenneth Duncan. I'roduclion .Mynia Perkins. Circulation 
Jane Ware. Editorial Secretary 

Eastern Editorial Bureau Western Editorial Bureau 

fiobert Seymour. Jr.. Eastern Manager Edmund Kerr, Western Manager 

489 Fifth Avenue. New York Citv ^^038 Beverlv Boulevard, Los Angeles 4 

Kherside 90215 or .MLrray Hill 2-2492 Telephone: DUnkirk 8-0613 

iuc One, Volume Fourteen of Business Screen ^laRazinc. published February 15, 1953. Issued S time annually at six-week 
trials at 7064 Sheridan Road. ChicaKo 26. Illinois by Business Screen Magazines. Inc. Phone BRiargate 4-82.t4. O. H. Coelln. 
, Editor and Publisher. In New York: Robert Seymour, Jr., 489 Fifth .Avenue. Telephone Riverside 9-0215 or MUrray Hill 
1492. In Los Angeles: Edmund Kerr. Telephone DUnkirk S-06U. Subscriptions SJ.OO a year; $5.00 two years (domestic): 
S4.00 and $7.00 foreign. Entered as second class matter May 2. 1946. at the post ofiice at Chicago. Illinois, under Act of 



1879. Entit 
advertising a 



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Trade-mark registered V. S. Patent Office 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



==CHICAGO 

1345 Argyle Street 

NEW YORK 

385 Madison Ave. 



^ 



7 



^E ARE LIVING in the age of opportunities unlimited. 
Charles F. Kettering told members of the National Society of 
Professional Engineers,* but he qualified the statement by 
adding: 

Provided we recognize that the age of opportunity unlim- 
ited is made up of fingers that know how to do things 
and minds that know how to think things. 

In a world of growth and change, there are always new skills 
and new thought patterns. 

If men and women are to grow with the times, they must learn 
how to act and how to think. 

No better teaching method has been devised to train both 
fingers and minds than that provided by films, and particu- 
larly films that are written and produced by Wilding. 



^DETROIT 

1000 Dime Bldg. 



CLEVELAND 

1010 Euclid Bldg. 



^HOLLYWOOD 

5981 Venice Blvd. 



ST. LOUIS 

4378 Lindell Blvd. 



CINCINNATI 

Enquirer Bldg. 



•Reprinted by pen 



1 En gin 



PITTSBURGH 

Law & Finance Bldg. 
*Studio Facilities 




MirWEi^EfiSJSSSPIFT*!; 




WILDING 

PICTURE PRODUCTIONS. INC. 

MOTION PICTURES . SLIDEFILMS . TELEVISION FILMS 




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^1^£%>^ sell 



.pro(h(cts — ideas 



We can tell before releasing the film how well we are selling. 
We would like to tell you about our unique, proven method of pre- 
testing films, and would like to show you some of our productions. 

WRITE TO AUDIENCE TESTED PRODUCTIONS. 2330 west third street 

LOS ANGELES 5, CALIFORNIA, TO THF ATTENTION OF MR B D CIRLIN 



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MIDWEST PRODUCERS MEET 



MIDWE 
Sout 





IDWESTERN, Eastern, and 
lern film producers will 
lie represented in Chicago on Tues- 
day, Fchruary 24 as the American 
Association of Fibn Producers 
which they have formed goes into 
its final organization phases. Such 
well-known concerns as Atlas Bee- 
land-King, DeFrenes, The Jam Han- 
dy Organization. Reid Ray Film 
Industries, Sarra. Vogue-Wright, 
and Wilding Picture Productions. 
Inc. are taking part in these im- 
portant deliberations. The publisher 
of Business Screen has served as 
arbiter and temporary chairman 
during preliminary phases of or- 
ganization, representing the inter- 
ests of clients as well as those of 
established, reputable companies 
who serve them. 

Taking a leaf from the coopera- 
tive effort of the Films Committee 
of the Association of National Ad- 
vertisers and producing companies 
whom Business Screen helped 
work out the "Check-List of Client 
and Producer Responsibilities in 
Production" several years ago, we 
have proposed the rough framework 
of a long-needed "Code of Fair 
Practices in Business Fibn Produc- 
tion." It is hoped that such forward 
looking efforts will continue and 
that eventual affiliation of similar 
regional producer groups will bring 
about a truly national federation of 
these concerns. 

Both clients and producers will 
benefit from research, promotion, 
and unification of basic standards 
of mutual concern. 

Veterans With Quarter-century service records receive honors from 
Jamison Handy, president of The Jam Handy Organization, (extreme left) 
Others (I to r) are Waller Wilhelm, motion picture librarian: Hal F. 
Connelly. Chicago non-theatrical supervisor: Frank .4. Gauntt, account 

executive: and William G. Luther, vice-president in charge of automotive. 



Jamii-on Ham)Y (tejll makes service 
Guard to William G. Luther, auto- 
motive vice-president, 

5 Jam Handy Staff Members 
Get 25-Year Service Awards 

♦ In recognition of 25 years of 
service, five members of The Jam 
Handy Organization received 
awards at a special anniversary pro- 
gram held at the Detroit studio on 
Monday, January 26. 

Jamison Handy, president, pre- 
sented engraved watches to WlLUAM 
G. Luther, vice-president in charge 
of automotive: Avery W. Kinney', 
organization secretary: Frank A. 
Gauntt, account executive: Hal F. 
Connelly', non-theatrical supervisor 
of the companys Chicago distribu- 
tion: and Walter Wilhelm, mo- 
tion picture librarian. The cere- 
mony honoring these 25-year asso- 
ciates also included the surprise un- 
veiling and presentation of portraits 
of each of the five done by artist 
John Gelsavage of the art depart- 
ment. 

Speaking before the assembled 
staff, Mr. Handy reviewed the prog- 
ress of The Jam Handy Organiza- 
tion for the past year. A preview 
of Priceless Heritage, a patriotic 
freedom - of - choice motion picture 
(continued on pace 8) 




BUSINESS SCREEN MAG.\ZINE 




SMfA W. C. McKERN, DIRECTOR 



THERE'S nothint; like the Stereo-RrALisT Camera for 
perfect realism anJ full, natural color. Artists and 
modelers for the Milwaukee Public Museum are noted 
for the authenticity of their displays. They've found that 
Rhalist slides are ideal as a reference in model work 
because Realist pictures exactly duplicate the original 
scene as seen by the human eye. 

Applications of the Realist are virtually unlimited. 
Salesmen have proved it to be "the world's finest visual 
selling tool. " Not only does it dramatically portray prod- 
ucts and services as they really are, but also commands at- 
tention. Realist sales kits are light and easy to handle, too. 

The Realist is also a vital tool in engineering and 
research, as a visible, permanent record of concrete fact. 
It's the ideal personal camera as well. 

If you haven't seen Realist pictures, ask your camera 
dealer or commercial photographer to show you some. 
Or, for further information, write David White Com- 
pany. 319 W. Court Street, Milwaukee 12, Wisconsin. 




Realist 



STEREO 



T//E C.ntF.R I Til IT SI:ES Tilt: SniE 4S YOV 



^^tl 



_.. _ ___ _ _. _ _. ^odmcts 

of life David White Company. Miluaukte i2. tTistonsim, 



REALIST 
PERMAMOUNTS 



Permanent protection for stereo slides. Specially Je$ij:ned for 
proper projection and viewing; 3 window sizes and spacing pre- 
adjust slides and eliminate need for projector adjustmems. Sturdy 
plastic-glass combination is resistant to breakage. Easy to asicmblc. 



19 5 3 P R O D r C: T M) \ R K \ I K \l 




use STEREO! 

. . . better for 
presenting & 
selling your 
products. • • 

BRUMBERGER 

STEREO EQUIPMENT 

. . . better for viewing^ 
protecting & carrying your 
valuable transparencies 



use 



* ---. J 




STEREO 
VIEWER 



Brilliont three dimensional pictures at your fingertips. Optic- 
ally ground and polished lenses, pin-point focusing . . . 
battery operoted with push-button switch. Lightweight, hard- 
impact Polystyrene (practically unbreakable). Takes all stand- 
ard 1^" X 4" stereo mounts. 
#1265 Viewer (less batteries) .List $9.95 



STEREO 
FILES 



Completely portable all-steel file, holds 50 metal or glass 
binders (or 125 cardboard mounts), in groups. Has scratch- 
proof compartment that holds your Stereo Viewer. A hand- 
some, complete unit-in-one . . . designed especially for the 
salesman who needs a compact, lightweight sales kit. 

#im File list $3.95 

Also, other convenient sizes. 



STEREO 
BINDERS 



The only all-steel binders with glass, that automatically center 
and align your transparencies. No kits, jigs, tope or masks 
required. Accurate prongs hold film correct for viewing in 
standard projectors or hand viewers. Simple snap assembly. 
#1166 Box of 24 sets List $4.50 

Pol. Perd. 




SIGHT AND SOUND 

(continued from face 6) 
produced for Superior Coach for 
general eirculation by Jam Handy, 
concluded the program. 

Dedicated to the improveiiient 
of communication of ideas for busi- 
ness and industry through motion 
pictures and all other visual aids. 
The Jam Handy Organization was 
founded by Mr. Handy in 1912 and 
incorporated in 1918. 

Motion Picture Industry Council 
Notes Film Activity of Leftists 

* It was reported, last month, that 
the .Mine. Mill and Smelter Workers 
Union, expelled from the C.I.O. in 
1950 as being "Communist domin- 
ated." is cooperating with a group 
of film people connected with the 
"unfriendly Hollywood nine" in 
making a motion picture presum- 
ably for showing to labor groups 
and the general public throughout 
the country. 

Those reported to be making the 
film, at Silver City, N. M., which 
has come to the attention of the Mo- 
tion Picture Industry Council, are: 
Herbert Biberman, who served a 
six-month jail sentence for refusing 
to answer questions before the 
House Un-American Activities Com- 
mittee, his wife. Gale Sondergaard 
and writers Paul Jarrico and Paul 
R. Perlin. 

Graeme Fraser New Vice-PresicJent 
and Director at Crawley Films, Ltd. 

♦ Graeme Fkaser. assistant gen- 
eral manager of Crawley Films 
Limited of Ottawa. Toronto and 
Montreal, has just been elected vice- 
president and a director, it was an- 
nounced by president F. R. Craw- 
ley. 

Mr. Fraser enlisted in the arm\ 
as a private and retired in 1946 
with the rank of Major and joined 
Crawley's in charge of sales and ad- 
vertising. He IS president of the 
800-member Ottawa Film Societ\. 




c iiairjiian of the National Commit- 
tee on Public Relations of St. John 
Ambulance, member of the Advis- 
ory Committee on Public Relations 
of the Canadian International Trade 
Fair. meml>er of the Public Rela- 
tions Committee of Dominion Boy 
Scouts Association, a director of 
the Canadian Film Institute and a 
Rotarian. 

A past president of the Advertis- 
ing and Sales Club of Ottawa, 
Mr. Fraser has just completed a 3- 
year term as Vice-President of the 
Federation of Canadian Advertising 
and .Sales Clubs. 

Large Volume of Business Reported 
by Princeton Film Center Executive 

♦ The Princeton Film Center, 
Inc. of Princeton. N. J. and New- 
York, is currently enjoying its larg- 
est volume of business in history, 
according to Jack Barless, execu- 
tive vice president. 

In addition to substantial work 
for the Navy and Air Force. The 
Film Center is engaged in the pro- 
duction of a series of television sub- 
jects for The Ford Foundation's 
Omnibus series over CBS, a televi- 
sion series for Coleman Publishing 
Company, motion pictures for such 
organizations as American .\irlines, 
.American Kennel Club. Wool Bu- 
reau. Inc., Glenn L. Martin Com- 
pany. McDonnell Aircraft Corpora- 
tion. Yale & Towne Mfg. Company. 
New York Wire Cloth Company, 
Port of New York Authority. Na- 
tional Conference of Christians and 
Jews and others. 

Television commercial accounts 
include Blue Cross of Philadelphia, 
Coleman Publishing Co.. Stanley 
Works, Haffenreffer Brewing Com- 
panv and Black & Decker Company. 

Former Admiral Corp. Film Head 
Joins Kling Studios as Executive 

♦ Edwin J. Sherwood has joined 
Kling Studios as coordinator of 
television production and sales. 
Robert Eirinberg. Kling president, 
has announced. Vice president Fred 
A. \lLES will continue to be in 
overall charge of all television and 
motion picture activities. F.irinberg 
said. 

As television pri)motion manager 
for the Admiral Corporation during 
the past five years. Sherwood was 
associated w ith the first commercial 
sponsorship on a television network 
of a musical variety show (Ad- 
miral Broadway Revue), mystery 
drama I Lights Out), quiz I Break 
the Bank) and college football (No- 
ire Dame). During the Admiral 
television coverage of the recent 
political conventions and election 
night returns. Sherwood originated 
the policy of ad lib commercials. 



BUSINESS SCREEN M A C A Z I N E 





YOUR STORY IN DEPTH— Now, after six years of research 
and development, Raphael G. Wolff Studios is able to offer 
its perfected Three-Dimensional, Full-("olor Motion Picture 
technique to American Industry. Here is a thrilling new 
experience, a new de[)th, a startling life-like presentation llial 



^^^LMjii/lfjs^ 



offers a vast new medium for your message. It is now possible to 
present products as they actually appear ... to tell your story or 
sell your idea with convincing realism never before achieved. 
These facilities are available for the production of a limited 
number of commercial Iv sponsored films. Inciuiries are invited. 



STUDIOS, HOllTWOOD 38 • NEW YORK CHICAGO DETROIT 



Raphael C. tt.ilf Sludioi ThrecOimensional Camera Dei 




c*ri 




FILM LABORATORIES 

HILLSIDE 7471 
1161 NORTH HIGHLAND AVE. 
HOLLYWOOD 38, CALIFORNIA 



Camera Eye 



OF TALENT, & THREE-DIMENSION 

]t/f EMBERS of tlie Screen Actors 
(juild have apparently won a 
laltle as iheir three-month old strike 
against producers and sponsors of 
television commercials ends March 
2. But the high cost of talent based 
on payment for re-use of these films 
may yet lose the economic war for 
most members of the talent unions 
affected. There will be fewer people 
in scenes, certainly more originality 
in ideas that economize on talent 
but still maintain the filmed com- 
merciaPs inestiminable value for 
ease of distribution as well as re- 
petitive quality and accuracy of the 
sponsor's original message on one 
station or one hundred. 



Three Dimension Vogue Revives 
Knoit-How of Business Producers 

♦ Cinerama's amazing box - office 
popularity has every major studio 
in Hollywood feverishly working on 
three-dimensional films and on films 
embodying the stereo illusion as 
does Cinerama itself. One result has 
been a sharp rise in Polaroid stock 
(they supply the viewing glasses 
used in such processes as Natural 
Vision, etc.) 

Ray Wolff, afifiable and inventive 
head of Raphael G. Wolff Studios, 
is working with Sol Lesser on 
theatrical 3-D subjects and also has 
a completed demonstration program 
which w ill be screened in such ma- 
jor cities as New- York, Detroit, Chi- 
cago etc. during March. 



Producers Should See More 
Of One Another s Pictures 

M Sponsored film production is a 
highly competitive business. In 
more cases than might be imagined, 
the people at ABC Film Productions 
don't know the folks at XYZ Stu- 



3-D Production: as a 
prehu/e to impending 
demonstrations of 
three-dimensional mo- 
tion pictures (see 
above/ Hollywood pro- 
ducer R. G. Wolff 
(left) is shown with 
his own 3-D camera 
setup. Henry J. Lud- 
win /center) and A. S. 
Bodrero ( right) are 
shown with Mr. Wolff. 



dids. which is located right across 
the slreel, much less have any idea 
what sort of work they are doing. 
ABC people are so afraid XYZ will 
swipe their clients that they don't 
want to have anything to do with 
them, and vice-versa. 

(Cooperation for (Quality 
Despite the heartening formations 
of producer organizations that have 
progressed so much during 1952, 
much of the industry still exists 
in a sort of vacuum. This is brought 
to mind in considering the lack of 
comparative information many pro- 
ducers have about the quality of 
their own product. ABC, for in- 
stance, makes five or six pictures 
every year, and, normally, it man- 
ages to see other producers' films 
ten or twelve times a year. This is 
a terribly small amount of film to 
use as a yardstick of quality when 
it is considered that there are at 
least fifteen hundred sponsored 
motion pictures released annually. 
Every week or so. some firm like 
ABC will call a Business Screen 
office and and ask how it would be 
possible to obtain a print of some 
other producer's film. We usually 
can tell them it's easy — just call up 
XYZ and ask them to loan you one. 
But ABC wouldn't dream of doing 
that — it's unheard-of — why, they 
they are hot competitors. 

Other Fields Compare Work 
Competition is a fine thing, and 
there is such a thing as keeping 
a client cozy, but producers would 
all do a lot better to call an open 
season on loaning prints back and 
forth. Advertising improves because 
competitive agencies can easily com- 
pare their work, seen on printed 
pages that are easily available. 
Manufacturers test each other's 
products constantly in searching for 
improvement. It is equally true in 
this business — every producer 
should see at least a hundred other 
films than his own every year. It 
will help everybody — film makers, 
sponsors and, most of all, the 
audience . . . our No. 1 objective. Jf 




BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 




. . . and writing^f iTf ft stories and producing KflflEft 
live action and animated films is our business . . . 



NEW YORK - 60 E. fORTV-SECOND SI. CHICAGO -AMBASSADOR WEST HOTEl lOS ANGELES- 201 N. OCCIDENTAl BUD 



IN PRODUCTION 



THE FILM CENTER'S 
9th and 10th Motion Picture for 

YALE & TOWNE 
MFG. CO. 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



IN PRODUCTION 



A New Motion Picture, 
As Yet Untitled, for 

AMERICAN AIRLINES 



IN PRODUCTION 



A television series 
for 

THE FORD FOUNDATION'S 

OMNIBUS 

CBS Sunday 
4:30—6:00 



,N PRODUCTION 



An Orientation Motion Picture 

GLENN L. MARTIN 

COMPANY 

BALTIMORE, MD. 



There are many sound reasons why more 
and more discriminating motion picture 
sponsors and advertising agencies are being 
served by THE PRINCETON FILM CENTER, INC. 



IN PRODUCTION 



THE FILM CENTER'S 
Seventh Motion Picture for 

McDonnell 
aircraft corp< 

ST. LOUIS, MO. 



THE PRINCETOH 

CARTER ROAD, PRINCETON. N. J. 



PHONE PRINCETON 3550 



IN PRODUCTION 



Television Commercials 

for 

BLUE CROSS of PHILADELPHIA 

STANLEY WORKS 
PICKWICK ALE 

COLEMAN PUBLISHING CO. 



IN PRODUCTION 



A Sales-Public Relations 
Motion Picture for 

mrmwiRECLiiTH 
iwPMr 

NEW CANAAN, CONN. 
YORK, PA. 



IN PRODUCTION 



U 



H 



Hunters 



urncane 

for the 

UNITED STATES 
AIR FORCE 



IN PRODUCTION 



IN PRODUCTION 



IN PRODUCTION 



•VIA PORT OF NEW YORK" 

28 Minutes in Color 

Sponsor 

PORT OF NEW YORK 
AUTHORITY 



"221* 

20 Minutes in Color 

Sponsor 

AMERICAN KENNEL CLUB 



NEW TRAINING 

MOTION PICTURE 

Sponsored by 

WOOL BUREAU, 

INC. 



IN PRODUCTION 



Write or phone for our illustrated brochure. We 
would welcome the opportunity to discuss your 
motion picture production and distribution plans 
with you and to screen some of our recent work. 



FILM CENTER, INC 

270 PARK AVENUE, NEW YORK, N. Y. 
PHONE PLAZA 5-0322 



TWELVE 

ORIENTATION AND TRAINING 
MOTION PICTURES FOR 

UNITED STATES 
NAVY 




A NEW FEATURE PICTURE 

for the 

UNITED STATES 
AIR FORCE 



IN PRODUCTION 



IN PRODUCTION 



IN PRODUCTION 



THE COLEMAN PUBLISHING 
COMPANY'S 



A Color Motion Picture for 



"TFT FFTYTT" ™^ nationai conference 

1 LjljLjr 1 Al 1 OF CHRISTIANS AND JEWS 

A SERIES FOR TELEVISION 



A Special Assignment 
for 

MONSANTO 

CHEMICAL COMPANY 

SPRINGFIELD, MASS. 



w specialists in 

VISUAL SELLING 



^^-s 




c^ 



CO 
CO 



CO 





^f\l\f \lNC 



200 East 56th Street. NEW YORK 
16 East Ontario Street, CHICAGO 



Prevue Problem 

WHEN YOU PREVIEW YOUR 
FILMS USE PROFESSIONAL 
SHOWMAN'S TECHNIQUE 



JUST A FEW WEEKS AGO, one of the 
largest industrial concerns in 
the country intrtjduced a new film 
in New York about a product that 
it wants to push hard in a most com- 
petitive market. 

To showcase the film, top execu- 
tives came east from their midwest 
headquarters, a ballroom was hired 
in a big hotel, catering with much 
food and drinks was arranged, and 
about a hundred editors of news- 
papers, wire services and national 
magazines were invited to see the 
unveiling of the new film and hear 
the gospel about the company's 
products. 

Almost everything worked out 
beautifully. The people came, the 
hosts were charming and the re- 
freshments were more than ade- 
quate. But what about the film — the 
beautiful, expensive, carefully pre- 
pared color gem that was supposed 
to be the focal point of the gath- 
ering? 

Everything Ready to Go 
Here's how it was set up: The 
equipment could hardly have been 
better — one of our best makes of 
projectors with speaker and screen 
to match. The film was threaded, 
pre-focussed and ready to run on 
the opening title. By it, sat an op- 
erator. And all this was just the way 
it should have been. 

Then, in walked the guests. Three 
of the first arrivals tripped over 
cords which were strung at random 
all over the room. One waiter bear- 
ing drinks stumbled over the speak- 
er cord, which lay across the only 
passage into the room, no less than 
half a dozen times. But, by the time 
the speeches were over and the show 
was ready to begin, the patient op- 
erator had conscientiously recon- 
nected all plugs and sockets. 

Then Came the Debacle 

"On with the show," cried the 
sales manager. Nothing happened. 
Men began scurrying around in the 
back of the room. 

"Where the hell do you turn off 
the damn lights?" said one harassed 
\'oice. After a good minute or two 
another voice said, "I found them." 

He had. too. and he'd turned off 
not only the lights but the projector 
power source, as well. 

"Turn 'em on!" yelped the op- 
erator. So all the lights came on 
again. The audience stirred and 



craned their necks to see the un- 
scheduled show in the back of the 
room. "These film shows are really 
something, aren't they?" said one 
guest. 

Eventually, by trial and error, 
the right switch for the projector 
was found so the main performance 
could go on. But unfortunately, 
that same switch also operated a big 
spotlight in the center of the ceil- 
ing which flared brilliantly down on 
the center of the room. The show 
went on, brilliance or not. 

Moral: Check It Through 
What's the moral? Just this— 
when you spend 850,000 or so for 
a movie, S500 to hire a hall and 
serve drinks, please spend a buck 
or two just to make sure speaker 
cords are not scattered all over the 
room — and for someone who knows 
where the light switches are. 

Was this show unusual? Not at 
all — after looking at this kind of 
performance in hotel ballrooms four 
or five times this winter, some ob- 
servers are convinced that they do it 
much better in grade school class- 
rooms, where the boys and girls 
learn to show the teaching film prop- 
erly — as it should be shown. 5" 

Lutherans Announce Release of 
"Martin Luther" as Feature Film 

* Announcement of the release of 
Martin Luther, a new motion pic- 
ture on the life of the Protestant 
reformation leader, was made last 
month by Dr. Paul C. Empie. execu- 
tive director of the National Luth- 
eran Council. Costing over S4(X).- 
000, the hour and a half film was 
made last year in Germany by 
Louis de Rochemont Associates. 

In presenting the film to Council 
members, Dr. Empie said that 
"since this dramatic picture pulls no 
punches, we may expect that its re- 
lease will involve us in a certain 
amount of controversy, especially 
with representatives of the Roman 
Catholic Church." He went on to 
say that great care had been taken 
to insure that the film would be his- 
torically accurate, and that "after 
all the sparks and smoke have blown 
away the story would produce a 
wholesome understanding of the 
reformation." 

Martin Luther was sponsored by 
participating groups of the eight- 
church Lutheran National Council. 
It is part of an aggressive "home 
7nissions" program of the church 
and will be shown first on a test 
basis in theatres in Cleveland, 
Chapel Hill. N. C. and Portland, 
Me. Depending on public reaction, 
it may be shown later as a national 
theatrical release, or it may be re- 
stricted to church showings only. 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



NO. 1 Of A SERIES ^ 

for better selling, training and 
demonstration through photography 

Audio-Visual methods pay off in many ways 
... a few examples from the files of 
Kodak Audio-Visual Dealers 




Automotive repairmen taught how to sell 



■Each of our 28 District Monogers wos sent a Kodascope 
Pogeont Sound Projector for showing our 16mm. color film 
to groups of independent automotive repoirmen. The pic- 
ture shows and tells them how to become better merchandis- 
ers and more soles-minded — is helping them recapture a 
bigger shore of the potential market for our product. Re- 
id we ore glod to report 



ults hove been very gratifying a 
that the projectoi 



, . nt perfo 

ifacturer of piston rings." 







Sells more animal feed v/ith pictures 



Recently a distributor of vita 
nanufocture of feedstuffs bou 
?ra to take color slides showii 
less. To project the slides he u 
which he sets on customers' 



Lites 



the 



ht o Kodak Signet 35 Com 
I various phases of his busi 
s a Kodoslide Toble Viewei 
esks. The customer himsel 



chonges slides while the distributor talks. "This idea high- 
lights importont sales points, enables our customers to see 
what we are talking about. We hove built interest and in- 
creased our soles with this technique. Now all our men ore 
using Kodoslide Table Viewers."' 







Heavy-duty movie projector !v 
mounted on truck for road shows 



To meet the varying requirements of its current road show, 
one of the world's largest automobile monufocturers mounted 
a new heavy-duty Eostmon 16mm. Projector, Model 75. on 
a truck, ochieving the advantages of o portable unit. Some- 
times showings of its films must be mode under adverse con- 
ditions, requiring powerful illumination and ample but un- 
distorted sound, which the Model 25 provides. But roIHng 
around the country on all kinds of roads also demands a 
projector that can withstand rugged handling. Experience 
to dote indicates that this unit, while designed for theater- 
quality projection on o day-in doy-out basis, is functioning 
efficiently in its role as a portoble unit. " 

•Nome on request 



BUSINESS FILMS . . . cjemonstrate, train, dramatize, sell 



Make own movies for training and job studies 

■'The Cine-Kodak Special II Comera we purchased in 1949 
has proved very sotisfactory. We have used it for moking 
technical training movies, such as time studies. Our processes 
hove been filmed to train foremen and supervisors, also for 
interplant discussions. An intangible point of value is the 
greater effectiveness gained by the use of locally produced 
films because of their pertinence to specific problems under 
study. It has hod a good workout on employee social and 
sports events promoted by the company, too." — From a na- 
tionally known sewing machine company. ' 



These are but a few examples of the ways in which 
Kodak Audio- Visual materials are helping business and 
industry to make ond sell better products. For the name 
of your nearest Kodak Audio- Visual Dealer—one of a 
coast-to-coast chain of soles-service representatives — 
use the coupon below. ^ 



EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY, Rochester 4, N. Y. 



Pleaie send me name 


of nearest Kodak Audio-Visual Dealer; also 


complete information 


on the products checked: 


1 1 16mm. motion-pi 


ture cameras; [ ] 16mm. sound projectors; 


1 ) mm/oft/re still cam 


eras; [_J color slide projectors, table viewers. 










- ^ 


riTY 


70Nf ^^^^^^^^H 


STATF 


^^^^RMH 



1953 PRODUCTION REVIEW 



IS 



Coming Up 

Pei:fect 
Precision 

Prints 



"SELECTIVE PRINTING 
FOR EVERY SCENE" 

This is one of the essential depart- 
ments at Precision uhicli doesn't 
depend on automatic machinery. 
Only intelligence and skill can be 
depended on to select a timing value 
for the correct printing of essential 
elements. That's what you get in a 
Precision timed print — a selective 
printing exoosure for every scene. 




YOUR ASSURANCE OF 
BETTER 16mm PRINTS 



13 Years Research and Spe- 
cialization in every phase of 
16mm processing, visual and 
aural. So organized and equip- 
ped that all Precision jobs are 
of the highest quality. 

Individual Attention is given 
each film, each reel, each scene, 
each frame — through every 
phase of the complex business of 
processing — assuring you of the 
very best results. 

Our Advanced Methods and 

vjur constant checking and adop- 
tion of up-to-the-minute tech- 
niques, plus new engineering 
principles and special machinery 



n 



Precision Film Laboratories — a di- 
vision of J. A. Maurer, Inc., has 14 
years of specialization in the Umim 
field, consistently meets the latest de- 
mands for higher quality and speed. 



enable us to offer service un- 
equalled anywhere! 

Newest Facilities in the 16mm 
field are available to customers 
of Precision, including the most 
modern applications of elec- 
tronics, chemistry, physics, optics, 
sensitometry and densitometry— 
including exclusive Maurer- 
designed equipment— your guar- 
antee that only the best is yours 
at Precision! 



I PRECISION 

FILM LABORATORIES, INC. 

B21 West 46th St., 
New York 19, N.Y. 
JU 2-3970 




IN THE FIELD OF BUSINESS FILMS 



MEMBERS of the Industrial Audio-Visual 
Association, founded and now grown to 
fair .stature as business' own audio-visu- 
al professional organization, will hold their an- 
nual meeting April 28-30 at the Del Prado Ho- 
tel in Chicago. Executives in business concerns 
professionally interested in joining lAVA or at- 
tending these useful workshops as guests are 
invited to write for details to William Cox, chair- 
man of the lAVA membership committee, c/o the 
Santa Fe Railway, 80 E. Jackson, Chicago. 

Largest Aiidio-l isiial Magazine Issue 
"K This Third Annual Production Review Issue 
of Business Screen, totaling 132 pages and 
covers, is the largest single issue of any audio- 
visual periodical. It also merits a word of trib- 
ute to those reputable and long-established film 
producers whose listings appear on 27 consecu- 
tive editorial pages. 128 of these concerns furnish 
excellent references in the data on their recent 
production activities. The organization dates of 
many of these firms are also worth noting . . . 
their combined years of specialized experience 
make a formidable total. But the recent quality of 
many of their films is even more important for 
it is reflected in the tremendous upsurge of 
16mm audiences requesting and liking what they 
have created for the screen. 

"Book Rate" Postage Proposed for Films 

-K On January 19, Mrs. Katherine St. George, 
Representative from New York State, introduced 
a bill (H.R. 139) in the House of Representa- 
tives which proposes the rate for shipments of 
16mra films and film catalogs, except to com- 
mercial theatres, be cut to 8c for the first pound 
and 4c for each additional pound, no zoning be- 
ing required. An even lower rate is provided for 
fihns, tape and disc recordings, filmstrips, slides 
and other audio-visual materials when sent to 
or from schools, colleges, churches, or non-profit 
clubs and fraternal groups. This lower rate 
would apply within the first three zones only and 
would be 4c for the first pound plus Ic for 
each additional pound. 

The bill gives films a rate equality with books 
and similar reference works which they have 
long deserved. We hope it receives the favorable 
consideration of the Committee on Post Office 
and Civil Service, now considering the bill. These 
favorable rates have been accorded book pub- 
lishers and libraries, both commercial and non- 
connnercial, for many years. Sf 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



The biggest and best studio ever built 




r> the post 12 months MPO i 
rrews have shot motion pictures oil 
>ver (he map as indicated obove. 



We are often asked "Where is your studio?' 

Of course we do "studio" work, but 
as yet we have been unable to find 
a better studio than the world we 
live in ... or better actors than 
people as we find them. 



.>II*0 is current// producing motion 
pictures for . . . 

FORD MOTOR COMPANY 
MONSANTO CHEMICAL COMPANY 
AMERICAN AIRLINES 
REMINGTON ARMS 
NASH MOTORS 
DUCKS UNLIMITED 
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF STATE 
U.S. AIR FORCE 



_J^/U*C^ "Lp-ioJuziioni Line. 

15 EAST 53rd STREET • NEW YORK 22 • MURRAY HILL 8-7830 



li:.? I'KOI) I CTION K K\ 1 K* 



For Instant Movability 
and Advanced Design 



"HYDROLLY" 

(TV OR CAMERA DOLLY) 

Hydraulic liit type for fast up- 
ward and downward motion 
of TV and Motion Picture 
cameras. Lightweight— sturdy 
— easily transported in a sta- 
tion wagon. Fits through a 
26" door. Adjustable leveling 
head. In-line wheels for track 
use. Steering wheel and floor 
locks. 




SYNCHRO-FILM-ED SYNCHRONIZER 




A Precision Instrument for 

Synchronization and Measurement of 

16mm and/or 35mm Films 

Any combination of sprockets assembled to 
your specifications. Sturdy cast alum i num 
construction. Foot linear type, with frame 
divisions engraved on sprockets. Contact 
rollers adjusted individually for positive 
film contact. Fast finger-tip roller release, 
sprocket shaft slip lock, complete with foot- 
age counter. 



VARIABLE SPEED MOTOR with TACHOMETER 
for Cine Special and Maurer Cameras 



115 V. Universal Mo»or— AC-DC 
Variable Speed 8-64 Frames 
Separate Base for Cine Special 
Adapter for Maurer Camera 

INTERCHANGEABLE MOTORS: 

12 Volt DC Variable Speed S-64 Frames. 
115 Volt AC 60 Cycle, Synchronous Motor, 
Single Phase. 

Animation Motors tor Cine Special, Mauier. 
B S H. Milcbell Cameras, Motors lor Bolei and 
Filnm Cameras, and Time Lapse Equipment. 

• LENS COATING 

• "T" STOP CALIBRATION 

• DESIGNING ond MANUFACTURING 

of lens mountings and camera equipment 



for I6mm and 35mm 

• BAUSCH & LOMB "BALTAR" 

LENSES <znd others for Motion Picture and 
TV Cameras. 

• RENTALS — SALES — REPAIRS: 

Mitchell, Eyemo. Bell & Howell, Wall, 
Cine Special Cameras. 



Write for full Information and prices 



JOHN CLEMENS 



NATIONAL CINE EQUIPMENT, 

209 WEST 48th STREET. NEW YORK 36. N. Y. 




ERWIN HARWOOD 



Business Adapts Stereo Stills 
as Potent Visual Sales Tool 

A FIKLD KKPOKT BY KAY MCKKK 



CjTERico STILLS are replacing the 
•^ heavy sample cases formerly 
carried by traveling salesmen. These 
three-dimensional pictures, with 
hand viewers, are proving to be a 
potent visual sales aid for merchan- 
dising a wide list of products rang- 
ing from toys to soda fountains and 
from machine tools to fountain 
pens. 

Heretofore, camera companies 
have been concentrating on the ama- 
teur market, letting the industry and 
business market develop almost by 
itself. But now majors in the stereo 
field like David White Co,, Milwau- 
kee and stereo newcomer Revere 
Co,. Chicago, report they are throw- 
ing promotional weight behind com- 
mercial business. 

Increasing Use Is Predicted 

So the trend toward industry use 
of three-dimensional pictures is ex- 
pected to accelerate. 

Moreover, David White expects 
to have an automatic feed stereo 
slide projector on the market in 
about a year. That would allow the 
svnchronizing of tape recordings 
with stereo presentations and would 
open the door to a whole new field 
of applications for stereo. 

David White will start limited 
production of a new manual feed 
stereo projector in May designed to 
accomodate three different sizes of 
stereo slide mountings without caus- 
ing undue eye strains when switches 
are made from one size to another. 

The unit, which will weigh about 
23 pounds, will be equipped with 
two 500-watt bulbs and will sell for 
a basic price of about S300 equip- 
ped with an f 2.8 lens. A complete 
set of lenses, which range from 2^1; 
to 7V2 inches in size, would hike the 
total price of the imtfit to about 
S500. A deluxe f 2.3 lens also will 
be made available as will adaptions 
for two 1.000-watt bulbs. 

A demonstration indicated the 
projector throws an excellent pic- 
ture on a ninefoot metalic screen 
with the two .SOO-watt bulbs. As 
with all other polarized light pro- 
jectors, spectators must wear po- 
laroid glasses to obtain the three- 
dimensional effect. 

Because of the new principal of 
slide loading incorporated in this 
projector, company officials say an 
automatic loading device may be 



adapted to it without much diffi- 
culty. Development work already is 
underway toward putting such a 
device on the market. 

Currently, though, industry and 
business is doing most of its looking 
at stereo stills through hand viewers. 

Ideal for Bulky Products 

Ideal applications are those where 
a firm is handling a product which 
may be too bulky for a salesman to 
carry samples (machine tools, for 
instance), or where the product can 
best be displayed in its natural set- 
ting. There is no hard-and-fast rule, 
though, concerning the using of 
stereo. It appears that stereo may be 
adapted to virtually any product, 
with a little originality, 

".Stereo's use is limited only by 
the imagination of the merchandis- 
er," said Arthur H. Kaplan, partner, 
Sterling Co., Chicago, exclusive dis- 
tributor in the United States for 
the Busch camera made by Jules- 
Richard, Paris, France. 

"Stereo has been the finest sell- 
ing aid we've tried." said J. B. 
Gander, president. Bank Building 
and Equipment Corp. of America, 
St. Louis. This building finn takes 
stereo pictures of completed struc- 
tures, then shows them to prospec- 
tive clients in order to clinch sales. 

Parker Eliminates Sample Case 

Parker Pen Co., Janesville, Wis., 
formerly sent its salesmen on the 
road with 42-pound sample cases. 
Now salesmen carry 40-ounce kits 
with a viewer and set of stereo 
slides which show the line just as 
well with a whole lot less bother, 

Davstrom, Inc, Elizabeth. N, J,, 
furniture manufacturer, finds stereo 
an ideal device with which salesmen 
may show retailers the company's 
line of furniture in three-dimension- 
al color, in effect taking the furni- 
ture directly to the customer. 

The Egry Register Co,, Dayton, 
O,. is especially enthusiastic about 
this selling aid. A, M, Sheard, ad- 
vertising and sales promotion Man- 
ager, said: "Stereo slides have writ- 
ten up more sales for us than any 
other visual selling aid," 

Brunswick • Baike - Collender Co,, 
Chicago, manufacturers of bowling 
alley and billiard equipment, ob- 

(CONTINUED ON PAGE 22) 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



Transfilm 



. producers of effective films for. 



sales promotion 
public relations 
industrial relations 
education and training 



^ffjMttiii 



TRANSFILM'S Motion Picture Deportment and STUDEBAKER 
Explaining Studeboker's entire operotion to employees. 



Many of the nation's largest industrial 
companies, institutional organizations 
and advertising agencies have 
injisfed that TRANSFILM plan and 
produce their Industrial Relations 
films. They know that Tronsfilm 
industrial Relations films ore 
effective because they have been lifted 
out of a nuts-and-bolts category by 
the same attention to human values that 
has made Tronsfilm documentary 
productions award winners. 




TRANSFILM'S Slidefilm Department and SINGER Sewing Moctilne Co. 
Outlining Singer's retirement plan for employees. 




TRANSFILM'S Slidefilm Department and GENERAL FOODS 
Listing ond explaining employee benefits. 



TRANSFILM 



35 W. 45 ST.. NEW YORK 19. N.Y. 



1953 PRODUCTION REVIEW 




SOUNDCRAFT MAGNETIC RECORDING TAPE 

Top quality for top fidelity. The kind of high-fidelity 
you olwoys associate with professionals. 



FOR HOME MOVIE MAKERS! 
Wonderful Way to Make 
"Talkies" 

SoundcrafI Magna-Stripe* lets you 
make sound movies as easily and 
inexpensively as silent films. Add 
sound to old silent films. Erase and 
change the sound any time at all! 
Magna-Stripe service is available 
to you at your photographic store. 
Ask your dealer about it. 




'Bill, that's what I call 
professional 

sound'' 



You'll never know how professional the sound you record on your 

tape recorder can be, until you use Soundcraft Magnetic 

Recording Tape. You'll be thrilled by Soundcraft high-fidelity, 

delighted by the true-to-life reproduction. 

Soundcraft engineers are engaged in constant research 

for new methods, materials, processes. As a result, 

sound engineers throughout the industry — recording studios, 

radio and television stations, motion picture studios 

- demand Soundcraft Magnetic Recording Tape for the 

-performance perfection they need. 

Next time you visit your nearest dealer, ask for 

Soundcraft Tape. Hear for yourself the professional 

results of the sound you record. 



REEVES 



SOUNDCRAFT.. 

Dept. G, 1 East 52nd Street, N. Y. 22, N. Y. 
FREE! SOUNDCRAFT BOOKLETS 

Complete information on Soundcraft 

Magnetic Recording Tope and Mogno-Slripe. 

Yours for the asking — just writel 



BL'SINESS SCREEN M .\ G .\ Z 1 N E 




CONVENTIONAL SOUND TRACK, 

similar to sound track on tilms used 
in motion picture theatres, is opti- 
cally recorded— cannot bechaneed. 



MAGNETIC SOUND TRACK— 

added 10 sound or silent lilm for a 
few cents a loot- lets you record 
your own sound with the RCA 
Magnetic Recorder-Projector. 



Now ! Put your own sound on film 

-with the RCA Magnetic Recorder-Projector 



Get these nine extra values from your films 



Now give added meaning to every film you 
show— by recording your own sound with the 
RCA Magnetic Recorder-Projector. 

To record, you simply project a film, and 
speak into the microphone as you watch the 
screen. Erase, re-record, play back at any time. 



1. Add sound to silent films RCA 

Magnetic Recorder-Projector operates 
at 16- or 24-rrame speeds. 

2. Moke changes in present sound 
track — Change from optical to mag- 
netic sound at the flip of a switch. 

3. Add a crisp, ne^ sound track 
at any time. Prepare a complete sound 
track minutes before a showing. 

4. Let sound films speak 2 lan- 
guages—Use optical and magnetic 
sound to reach two audience lesels. 



5. Personalize the message to your 
audience. Mention specific situations — 
even mention members of the audience 

by name. 

6. Put training guide on film. 

7. Replace scratched sound track 

with clear niagnelic sound. 

8. Get superb sound quality. Finer 
sound than you\e ever heard on 16mm 
film l80-720() cps.). 

9. Erase and re-record at ans time. 



For more information vvn'fe to: 

RCA Visual Products, Dept. 25N, 
Building 15-7, Camden, N. J. 




ViSUAt PRODUCTS 

RADIO CORRORATIOM of AMERICA 

£MGIMC£RING RROOUCTS 0£ RARTMEMT. CAMOS M. N.J. 

In Conado; RCA VICTOR Company L.m.lvd, Monr>«al 



2 NEW RCA "400" DEVELOPMENTS 

FOR EXTRA FLEXIBILITY 

1. SYNCHRONOUS DRIVE no« a\ailahlc on ihc RCA Magnetic 
Rccordcr-I'rojccior and the RCA "•tOO" Junior or Senior projector. 
Lets you record or playback a perfectly synchronized sound track. 
OlTers acxuracy of conirol within '/i frame. 

2. MAGNETIC PLAYBACK KIT attaches to RCA "400" Junior or 
Senior projeclor. Lets \ou show and play back your magnetically 
recorded lilm without l\ing up your RCA Magnetic Recorder- 
Projector. Eliminates the possibility of accidental recordinj: m 
erasure. V'our RC \ Distributor can install it i^uickb. 



19 5 3 P R O 1) I! C T I O N R K \ I K VI 



dollars ^ 
sense! 




stereo Business: 



(continued from pace 18) 

viously can't show distant cus- 
tomers its installations in any other 
way except through pictures. But, 
flat photos left much to he desired. 
Now all salesmen have stereo view- 
ers and slides of various installa- 
tions. 

"Stereo has become our most fun- 
damental sales device," said an of- 
ficial. 

David White, which claims 90% 
of the total stereo still industry's 
sales in 1952, is the kingpin in the 
industry. Its sales provide a clue to 
the growth of industrial and busi- 
ness use of stereo. 

In 1948. White sold only a few 
hundred viewers to business users. 
In 19.51 the firm sold 35,000 viewers 
in all. and 17,000 of them went to 
cuniniercial buyers. In 1952. sales 
jumped to 200,000. with industry 
taking 150,000. This year the com- 
pany is aiming at sales level of 400,- 
000 viewers, and expects industrv 
will take 300,000. 

Sales Zoom Since '47 
While industrial users, of course, 
depend largely on commercial pho- 
tographers for their shots, White's 
sales of cameras do indicate more 
about the growth in stereo interest. 
White officials report sales soared 
from a few hundred in 1947 to 12,- 
000 in 1951. 25.000 in 1952 and to 
a pace which indicates 50.000 for 
1953. 

"We have been doubling our pro- 
duction every year and still haven't 
caught up with the demand," says 
James H. Calder, David White's 
sales manager. In 1952. for exam- 
ple, the company doubled its pro- 
duction over 1951, yet demand was 
such that Mr. Calder says produc- 
tion could have been hiked by 250% 
had it been physically possible and 
supply still would have run behind 
orders. 

Plenty of New Business 

Competition will be keener this 
year with Revere Camera in the 
field, but it looks as if there may be 
a lot of business for everybody for 
awhile. Revere, for instance, re- 
ports that it is back ordered for 
six months on the stereo camera it 
introduced late last year. Eastman 
Kodak now is readying a stereo 
camera, too. and expects to have it 
on the market late this year or 
early in 1954. A toy train manufac- 
turer is gumnng for the low priced 
fiilil with a camera it will announce 
-li..rll\. but it is doubtful that this 



uill have much cunimcrcial appli- 
ralion. 

Other companies in the field in- 
clude Sawyer's Inc.. Portland, Ore., 
and importers of foreign cameras 
like Sterling Co. or the Ercona 
Camera Corp., New York, distribu- 
tors for the Gennan-make Illoca 
Stereo II. 

There are numerous concerns 
making viewers or projectors. But, 
those of most concern to industrial 
users beside camera companies 
which also make viewers are Brum- 
berger Co., Inc.. Brooklyn. Three 
Dimension Co., Chicago and Deep 
Vue Corp., Milwaukee. S" 



Allen B. Du Mont Laboratories 
Uses Stereo to Sell TV Receivers 

♦ Use of a three dimensional stereo 
slide kit as an aid to its current 
sales information program has been 
announced by the receiver division 
of Allkn B. Dl Mont Labora- 
tories. Inc. 

The stereo viewer with push but- 
ton lighting, complete with color 
slides of each of the fourteen re- 
ceivers in the present Du Mont line 
plus six other slides depicting Du 
Mont's plants production and test- 
ing facilities, including the new 
network studios, has already been 
distributed to the receiver's divi- 
sion's regional sales representatives. 

The new stereo equipment will be 
used by the regional representatives 
as a demonstrator for the Du Mont 
receiver line and to provide distrib- 
utors and dealers with Du Mont's 
complete company background. 

Twenty slides have been fur- 
nished with the stereo viewer, with 
Du Mont planning to add more 
slides from time to time. In this 
way. the three dimensional pictures 
will eventually contain a complete 
slide file on the Du Mont organiza- 
tion's products and facilities. 

At present the new equipment is 
being used exclusively by Du Mont's 
receiver group, but by changing the 
slides it would be possible to use 
the viewer as a sales or information 
aid for any of Du Mont's other di- 
visions. 



Agriculture Film Looks at "Kenaf" 

♦ The r. S. Dejiartment of Agri- 
culture has released a new 16mm 
sound film tilled Kenaf, which 
covers the jutelike fiber of the 
same name. It is mainly used as 
cloth for sugar bags and was trans- 
planltd from the Orient to Cuba, 
where it is used widely. United 
\^'orld Films. Inc. is the distribu- 
ior. Write to 1445 Park Ave., New- 
York :!'). 



BUSINESS SCREEN M .A G A Z I N E 



When the World is 




Speak the Language of Your Customers 




A 



motion picture with a native language sound track is a pow- 
erful medium ffcr the creation of goodwill and customer demand, 
and for teaching foreign representatives the use, maintenance 
and selling of your products. 

When planning new films, for a small additional cost, you can 
"have multi-language coverage of your export markets. You can 
also get extra value out of films you now have, by putting them 
in other languages. 



We are doing an increasing amount of this type of production, 
including lip-synchronized live sound sequences, for industrial 
and official clients. 

Our studios are fully equipped with experienced personnel for trans- 
lations and complete film and tape recording facilities for doing 
this work exceptionally well. 



LET US SHOW YOU HOW YOU CAN REACH FAR FLUNG MARKETS MORE EFFECTIVELY 



Mm 



S(}unJ JiasiefiS, Jnc. 



MOTION PICTURES 
SLIDE FILMS 
TV SHORTS AND 



ESTAB. 
1937 



165 WEST 46TH STREET — NEW YORK 36 . . . PHONE PLAZA 7-6600 COMMERCIALS 




Onl)' Victor has Magnesound. Only Magnesound is a 
magnetic sound attachment. With revolutionary Magne- 
sound, you add your own low-cost sound to films by using 
your Victor 16mm projector. To give your films added 
effectiveness the sound track can be adapted for any need 
and can be changed over and over. You enjoy complete 
flexibility by having both magnetic and optical sound on 
the same film. 

Complete attachment includes 
Magnesound drum and amplifier, 
microphone and carrying case. 



VICTOR 

AMIMATOGRAPM CORPORATION 

DAVENPORT. IOWA 

cago • New York • Diitributors Throughout the World 



OFFERS THESE GREAT 
FEATURES! 

The only magnetic attachment en the 
I market — and it is specifically designed to 
fit your Victor 16mm Sound Projector. 

2 Unmatched price . . . complete unit only 
$199.45. 

3 Easy to attach. Eosy to operate. 

^ High fidelity sound for voice and music. 

J Records and ploys back immediately! 

FOR THE FULL STORY. MAIL TODAY 



VICTOR ANIMATOGRAPH CORPORATION 

Deportmenf BS48, Davenport, Iowa 

1 want to increase the use of my Victor projector. 

[3 Please send me full information on the 
Magnesound Recording Attachment. 

D Forward name of m> Victor distributor. 



SUBSCRIBE NOW TO BUSINESS SCREEN: a full 
year's service of eight hig issues is onlv 83.W) iii- 



iluding iMci annual numbers and himdreds of pages 
of ustful (lata: Order from 7064 Sheridan, Chicago. 



Plant Safety Is Featured In New 
National Safety Council Releases 

♦ I lie foreinans key position in 
tlif plant safety program is the 
ihfiiie of t«() safety films released 
recently by the National Safety 
CoiNtiL. Both films were produced 
1>\ Sakka. Inc. 

t'Ick Your Safety Target, an all- 
tolor cartoon film is based on actual 
accident-reduction plans within in- 
dustry. The film offers a foreman 
beset with an accident-ridden de- 
partment a three-step plan for de- 
tecting accident causes and taking 
corrective action. The three steps 
call for determination of the ma- 
terial or equipment involved, the 
action taken by the worker, and the 
details of the accident. 

The film shows how a definite ac- 
cident pattern emerges. From the 
[latlern a series of safety targets 
are set up which provide the fore- 
man with specific goals. He is shown 
how his accidents can be reduced by 
aiming at one target at a time. 

The second fibn, A Cray Day for 
O'Grady, employs a series of com- 
edy situations to dramatize the high 
cost of accidents. O'Grady, a new 
foreman, learns that it takes less 
time and money to prevent acci- 
dents than to have them. 

The films were prepared under 
the supervision of Charles Alexan- 
der, manager of the Council's in- 
dustrial department, and Glen Grif- 
fin, director of industrial training. 

A Gray Day for O'Grady is avail- 
able in 35nun sound slidefilm and 
16mm sound motion picture, both 
black and white. Pick Your Safely 
Target, filmed in stop-motion car- 
toons, is available in 35mm color 
sound slidefilm. and 16mm motion 
picture both color and black and 
white. 

.Additional information on the 
films' availability can be obtained 
by writing the National Safety 
Council. 425 N. Michigan Ave., Chi- 
cago 11. 

Robert Flaherty's Film Work 
Museum of Modern Art Program 

* The Junior Council of the Mu- 
seum of Modern Art in New York 
presented on the 14th of January 
an evening program devoted to a 
discussion of the life and works of 
Robert Flaherty accompanied by a 
showing of selections from his films 
and recordings made by Flaherty, 
himself, as well as tributes to him 
by Lillian Gish. John Huston and 
Orson Welles recently broadcast by 
the British Broadcasting Company. 

Richard Griffith. Curator of the 
Museum's Film I^ihrary and author 
of the forthcoming book. The 
World of Robert Flaherty, served 
as moderator. 



24 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



here 
it 
starts • 




This is where your film starts: in the human brain; 
in these three-odd pounds of nerve tissue which, 
mysteriously, give birth to imagination. 

Unifilms believes that scripting, direction and production 
techniques are dead without imagination . . . and also, without 
imagination, the control of production costs gets out of hand. In 
fact, wringing the greatest amount of production from each 
dollar now requires more imagination than ever. 

But, above all, imagination at Unifilms is concerned with 
audience psychology: seeing and feeling, as they do, 
their hopes, ambitions, fears. 

Who have we imagined ourselves to be? Well, among others, 
a ten-year-old youngster dangerously playing along the 
Baltimore & Ohio Railroad's right-of-way ... a trackman for 
the Pennsylvania ... a service-station attendant for 
Sun Oil Company . . . and, for the Federal Security Agency, 
a prospective employer of an amputee. 

Where does your film start? Right there at your telephone. 
Lift the receiver and call Unifilms . . . now. 



UNIFILMS, INC. 

NOT JUST MOTION PICTURES. BUT MOVING PICTURES 



146 EAST 47TH STREET 

NEW YORK IT. N.Y. 

MURRAY HlUL 8-9325 






225 SOUTH 1 5TH STREET 

PH1L.ADEL.PHIA 2. PA. 

KlMGSLEY 5-S013 



1953 PRODUCTION RE\IEW 



25 



PERSONNEL 



COMES FIRST 




Then comes "KNOW HOW 
Then "GO - TO - IT - TIVE - NESS " 
Then "DELIVERY OF THE GOODS" 

We have them all here at 

FORDEL FILMS 




v^ 



LILLIAN CONNtLLY 



ORLANDO SEDA 1187 UNIVERSITY AVENUE, NEW YORK 52, N. Y. 

LUdlow 8- 5100 ■ 5101 ■ 5511 • 5512 ■ 5513 
CABLE ADDRESS: FOHDELABS, N. Y. 

Mfinhcr Fihii Producers Association of N. Y. ami Socicti/ of Motion Picture and Telerinioii Eiimiiecrs 



26 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



FORDEL FACILITIES 




Research 

Scripts 

Story Board 

Casting 

Wardrobe 

Make-up 

Props 

Studio Sets 

Lighting 

Cameras 

Direction 

Stills 
Narrators 
Recording 
Music 
Sound Effects 
Art Work 
Animation 

Titles 

Slide Films 

Special Effects 

Stock Shots 

Opticals 

Editing 

Matching 

Printing 

Machine Shop 

Rejuvenating 

Peerless Treating 

Inspection 

Distribution 

Special Shows 

Foreign Versions 








^^ACHlME SHOP 



FORDEL FILMS 



1187 UNIVERSITY AVENUE NEW YORK 52. N Y. 

LUdlow 8-5100 - 5101 - 5511 - 5512 - 5513 Coble Address - Fordelabs. N Y. 



/ /';//)( I'i'niiii-irs A.i.iiirintioi} of X. Y. tni'l Soriitii <ii Mntmn I'irturi mid Tili 



i:,'.n 



)«5 3 I'KOI) I CTMIN II K\ I K\\ 




We were naturally a bit puffed up when the first 
film we ever produced,* back in 1948, won a top 
Award at the Cleveland Film Festival. 

* "HIGH-WAY TO HAWAII" for Vniled Air Lines 

Since then, awards have been coming with increas- 
ing frequency, until in 1952, Gate & McGlone films 
were honored at nearly every important film com- 
petition in the United States and Europe. Here's 
the list. . . 



NATIONAL COMMITTEE ON 
FILMS FOR SAFETY 
"Day in Court" 

(International Harvester 
Company) 

BOSTON FILM FESTIVAL 
"United 6534" 

(United Air lines) 

"Day in Court" 



EDINBURGH FILM FESTIVAL 
"United 6534" 

VENICE FILM FESTIVAL 
"United 6534" 

PORTLAND FILM FESTIVAL 
"United 6534" 

TOLEDO BUSINESS FILM 
FESTIVAL 

"Day in Court" 



And now the latest! by the National Visual Pres- 
entation Association and the Sales Executives Club 
of New York, for the best sales presentation on 
film in 1952 . . . 

"KING of the COWBOYS" 

(Roy Rogers Enterprises) 

Maybe ire can help you produce 

an award-ivinning film in 19.'y3 



GATE & McGLONE 



Films lor Industry 

1521 CROSS ROADS OF THE WORLD • HOLLYWOOD 28, CALIFOR NIA 




Studio Reports 

Transfilm Opens Air-Condilioned 
Studio Floor in NY Building 

♦ A iii]Ti|)lctcl\ air-<iiii(litiiiiii-il mo- 
tiuii picture sound studio covering 
an entire floor of the Tran.sfilm 
Building at 35 West 45th Street has 
just been opened for production. 
The studio will be a major factor in 
increased television film production 
at Transfilm Incorporated, and 
affirms the Company's faith in New 
York film production. 

The decision to turn an entire 
floor of a Fifth Avenue office build- 
ing into a studio is in line with 
Transfilms policy of keeping all 
production and executive facilities 
under one roof. Acquisition and de- 
velopment of the studio spreads 
Transfilm's tenancy of the building 
to five floors. 

The studio, which incorporates 
many of the most modern design 
features for motion picture produc- 
tion also boasts a built-in, build- 
ing-width "cyclorama," a two- 
walled, double-traveler track allow- 
ing free positioning of curtains, a 
fully mechanized machine shop 
equipped with power tools for scen- 
ery construction and a completely 
cross-indexed prop storage from 
which Company boasts it can select 
any prop available in less than 
three minutes. 

Grids and built in "gang boxes" 
in the ceiling facilitate overhead 
lighting from any angle. Suspended 
cable in the ceiling minimizes ne- 
cessity for floor cable, thus provid- 
ing more efficient working condi- 
tions. The studio also features con- 
ventional spider boxes for standard 
lighting. 

Marc Asch Joins Von Praag 

* As a further step in current ex- 
pansion of his company. William 
Van Praag, president of Van Praag 
Productions, has announced the 
appointment of Marc S. Asch as a 
vice-president and producer in the 
industrial and TV film division. 

Before joining Van Praag, Mr. 
Asch was civilian chief of film 
production for the U. S. Air Force 
and responsible for production and 
direction of training films, docu- 
mentaries and TV productions. 

Mr. Asch is co-holder of several 
Academy Awards and revolution- 
ized the editing field with his in- 
vention of the first film editing 
chart, the basic source of all subse- 
quent similar devices. He served in 
the Army Signal Corps Photo Cen- 
ter in New York as a Major, and up- 
on his release joined United World 
Films, a subsidiary of Universal 



Fii lures. While Associate Producer 
and Chief Film Editor of United 
World, Mr. Asch made, among 
iiiany other films, a series of track 
and field shorts in lollaboration 
with the AAU and the Olvmpic 
rnrnniiltcc. 



Princeton Completes 52 for TV 

♦ The Princeton Film Center, 
Inc. of Princeton, N. J. and New 
\ ork City, has completed fifty-two 
Norman Brohcnshire, The Handy- 
man, programs, a five minute tele- 
vision series produced in coopera- 
tion with David Lown. A total of 
260 subjects are planned. The se- 
ries, featuring Norman Brokenshire. 
has been sponsored by Royal Bed- 
ding Company. Black & Decker 
Company and The Stanley Works 
and United Artists Television Cor- 
poration, who handles the sales, re- 
ports that additional markets have 
been sold subject to time clearance. 

Expand AAinneapolis Production As 
Empire Moves to Larger Quarters 

♦ Empire Photo.solnd Inc. has an- 
nounced the completion of its firm's 
moving from its former building to 
its greatly expanded plant at 1920 
Lyndale Avenue. Minneapolis. 

Bill Yale, president of Empire, 
pointed out that in only seven years' 
time, the firm has completely out- 
grown its former facilities. Empire's 
new building houses a 3,500 foot 
sound stage, recording studios and 
control rooms, a preview" screening 
room, modern offices and produc- 
tion quarters, editing rooms, studios 
for artwork and soundslide film 
studios, plus a variety of other fa- 
cilities to serve the Twin Cities and 
the Upper Midwest of the United 
States. 



MOVIOLA 

FILM EDITING EQUIPMENT 
16MM-35MM 

. PICTURE 
I SOUND 
Photo and 

. SYNCHRO- 
NIZERS 
. REWINDERS 




BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



1 Think You've Got 
Something There, lyicClure" 



We have manufactured 

Sound Slidefilm 

machines for 16 years 



— ONE OF TEN MODELS — MODEL L 




pounds 



"That eight pounds knocked off the weight, 

"and 133 cubic inches oflf the size, 

"and that sound system that keeps them 
awake on both sides of the hall, 

"and that built-in screen with a black-as- 
night shadow-box, 

"and that compartment that carries eight 
records and takes warp out of 'em, 

"and that threading that you just push in, 

"and playing microgroove and all kinds and 
sizes of records, 

"and no immediate damage if you plug AC 
into DC, 

"and no catch to scrape door frames and 
collapse the works on the floor, 

"and a price that gets the largest possible 
circulation of programs. 

"Crimminy yes, McCIure, you've got some- 
thing there. And how Sound Slidefilm is 
starved for it." 



MANUFACTURED BY 



Want to hear what the PICTUREPHONE can do for you? 

0. J. McCLURE TALKING PICTURES 

Telephone CAnal 6-4914 



in5</2 WEST WASHINGTON BOULEVARD. CHICAGO 7 



19 3 3 P R D L (; T 1 () N R K \ I E W 




68<5:de^&^ VU-LYTE increases teaching 
effectiveness with flexibility and economy 



Every teacher has right at hand a wealth of 
simple and inexpensi\e materials with which to 
illustrate and dramatize oral instructions. How- 
ever, few of these items can be passed around the 
class, or viewed directly from one point. 

With the Beseler VU-LYTE Opaque Projec- 
tor, the whole class can see directly on the screen 
all sorts of available materials in black-and-white 
or colors. 

These materials can vary in size from a 
postage stamp to 10 x II sheets, and include 
magazines, illustrations, and three-dimensional ob- 
jects of interest. No previous preparation of these 




study elements is necessary. Flat sheets are fed 
into the VU-LYTE projector automatically, and 
are held by suction securely in place and flat with- 
out flutter. The platen can be lowered quickly to 
accept solid objects and books. The operator, with- 
out moving from the VU-LYTE, can direct a 
movable arrow of light to any point on the screen 
to direct pupils' attention to significant features 
in text, diagrams, maps etc. 

No other teaching tool can j/ossibly offer the 
simplicity, versatility, or conieitience of the Beseler 
\U-LYTE Opaijue Projector. 



Periodital Teaching Aid Mailed free 

We will gladly send you, free upon 
request, full information about the 
Beseler VU-LYTE, ond place your name 
on our mailing list to receive regularly 
OPAQUE PROJECTION PRACTICES. 
This valuable service bulletin is writ- 
ten bx teachers for teachers, ond dis- 

opaque projection to the problems of 
teochers in all grades and for all 
subjects. Its frequent listing of free 
source materials is alone invaluable 
to teachers with limited budgets. 

Ask for free demonstration of VU-LYTE 
arranged at your convenience. 




(Sede&^y 



COMPANY 

Newark 8, N. J. 
sf Opaque fraiecflen Cqu/pn 



THE BUSINESS MAN'S 1953 GUIDE TO GOOD AUDIO-VISUAL EQUIPMENT 

.Another big issue of BlISINESS SCREEN is in the mak- Visual Equipment Review: the Business Man's Guide 

iiif; as we iiintinuf unrk on the first annual Audin- to Equipment. Preview Theatres and Services. 



OeVry Corporation Opens New 
Eastern Sales and Service Center 

♦ I)e Vry (Corporation's Eastern 
sales and service branch has moved 
inlii its own specifically designed 
building at 29-04 .37th Avenue. 
Long Island City 1, New York. To 
I ilihrate the formal opening of 
liie iiPH building De Vry held "Open 
llciusc" ceremonies on Friday and 
."Saturday. February 20th and 21st. 
Wir.i.iAM C. De Vry. president of 
the sound motion picture equipment 
manufacturing firm served as official 
host. 

Highlight of the tw'o day "Open 
House ceremonies was the premier 
shotting of the Armed Forces new. 
standard single case 16mm sound 
motion picture projector. This JAN 
(Joint Army-Navy) Projector, as 
developed by De Vry, incorpor- 
ates a 16mm sound projector, an 
8-watt amplifier and a lO-watt loud- 
speaker in one compact, lightweight 
case. De Vry also demonstrated 
JAN equipment to which has been 
added auxiliary components for rec- 
ording and reproducing magnetic 
sound on 16mm motion picture 
film. 



"Doc" Feldman Samples Product 
in Color to Shovir Merits of Process 

♦ ""Doc'" Feldman, sales manager 
of Tri Art Color Corporation, 
Inc.. in New York, has developed 
a no^el method of showing the good 
qualities of the new Eastman nega- 
tive-positive 35mm color process. 
He photographs cans of soup, ciga- 
rette packages and a great variety of 
other products on strips of film and 
sends them out to the manufactur- 
ers of the respective products and to 
their advertising agencies. Response 
to date from this provocative pro- 
motion has been very good. Mr. 
Feldman will shoot just about any 
product on negative-positive color 
film that people interested will sug- 
gest to him, and provide sample 
strips with no obligation. 

Tri Art being a service organiza- 
tion for producers, Mr. Feldman is 
not looking for direct sales of fihn 
or laboratory service, his is a mis- 
sionary job that is developing new 
customers for producers and thus, 
eventually, for Tri Art. Calling on 
business men from New Orleans to 
Boston. '"Doc" tells them of the ca- 
pable producers in their area who 
are experienced in shooting the new 
color film and he recommends their 
services. 

It"s a far-sighted approach and 
one that is paying off handsomely 
for Tri Art and its customers. The 
lab is now processing color nega- 
tive-positive daily and provides as 
fast service as on black and white. 



30 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAG.\ZINE 



It's the Poor'Workman 




who blames his Tools 




We're very proud of ours 



For over thirty-eight years Pathescope has been accumulating 
the skill and experience needed in developing quality industrial film 
programs. 

We have the skill and the tools with which to do a job. Yes, and 
we're proud of our tools. 

1/" Sound Stage, 70 ft. x 35 ft. x 25 ft. 

l^ Reeves sprocket driven syncronous tope recording 

1/^ Process background projection engineered by and for Pathescope 

i/* Power tooled carpentry shop, 96 ft. x 22 ft. 

J/* Standing sets 

1/^ Props 



plus 



t^ Editing in 16mm and 35mm 
t' Interlock proiection 



PATHESCOPE PRODUCTIONS 

THE PATHESCOPE COMPANY OF AMERICA, INC. 

580 FinH AVENUE, NEW YORK 3«, N. Y. 

Ploia 7-S200 



PRODUCERS OF • MOTION PICTURES • FILM STRIPS - TELEVISION 




Plays All Records — 3 Speeds — 33^3 —45 — 78 rpm 

For Use With All Viewlex Projectors 150 to 500 Watts. 

Sound System Or Projector May Be Used Independently. 



Brilliant pictures and clear "belt-tone" sound 
in one compact economical unit that has 
delighted every educator and sales-manager 
who has ever heard it. 

Two permanent needles • Separate tone and 
volume controls • Uses filmstrip, slide, or 



combination slide and filmstrip Viewlex pro- 
jectors * "Light Multiplier" optical system — 
2", 3", 5", 7", 9", 11" lenses available with- 
out change of condenser system. Priced from 
$124.25 up. 
Write Dept. 234 for literature. 



Y^ 



All VIEWLEX projectors are guaranteed for a lifetime! 



35-01 QUEENS BOULEVARD, LONG ISLAND CITY 1, N. Y. 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 




CONSOLIDATED FILM INDUSTRIES 




NEW 16tnm LAB 



Consolidated is proud to make available to 
users of 16niin film its new 16mm laboratory. 



This is tlie first large, fully-equipped, 
professional lahoratory ever liuilt for the 
processing of 16mm film exclusively. It 
incorporates every advanced facility for 
attaining the finest possible quality in 
16nim hlack & white and color. 



In Every Field. One i\'ame Stands Out. 

In Film Laboratories, It's . . . « ■ I 

CONSOLIDATED FILM INDUSTRIES 



959 Seward Street 
Hollyivood 38. 
California 



phone: HOllynood 9-1441 



1953 PRODUCTION RE\IEW 



33 




Why is the CAMERETTE being universally 
selected as the ideal professional camera 
for 3-DIMENSIONAL photography? 



PRICE: It is the world's least expensive professional camera 
with the precision register of the most expensive 
cameras in the world! 

WEIGHT: The combined weight of two Camerettes in mount 
is only 65 pounds— 1 5th the weight of any other cameras 
thus far used. A single Camerette, with three lenses and 
loaded magazine, weighs only 15 pounds! 



The Camerette's easy adaptability for 

stereoscopic photography is just one 

more example of its all-around versatility 

— that lias made it perfect for studio 

use, for difficult locations, for use by 

all the armed forces in this country — 

Look at its advantages in every 
phase of operation ; 
Reflex Viewing, Framing, Focusing 
through the takini; lens at uU tiincs. 
Instantaneous Magazine Loading without 
the need for threading the camera. 
Divergent Three-Lens Turret, accommo- 
dating lenses from 18. .5mm to 30()mm 
without interference. The onh/ 
refle.x camera suited to lenses with 
such extreme focal lengths. 
Adjustable Shutter from 40° to 200°, 
the widest shutter opening available 
in professional cameras. 
Rapid Dove Tail Mounting. Slide its flat 
base on to the tripod and its locked tight. 
Complete line of accessory equipment. 
6 8 volt motor drive, 1 10 and 
220 single and three phase synchronous 
motors, hand gear bo.v, tripod, matte bo.\ 
and filter holders; lenses from 18.5mm to 
300mm a\ ailable, and focusing mounts 
for all principal makes of lenses . . . 
and the 16 .3.5 Camerette has all the 
advantages of the 35mm Camerette phis 
the ability to use both film sizes 
interchangeably. The changeover 
takes a matter of seconds. 



Rophoel G. Wolff. 




^ Ulamerette 

^V^ ^^r patents coutant-mathot • Manufactured by 

Eclair, Pans • for descriptive brochure write 

U.S. representative Benjamin Berg Agency 

1366 No. Van Ness Ave., Hollyv»ood 28, Calif. 



FOR BETTER SHOWS USE "THE AUDIO-VISUAL PROJECTIONISTS HANDBOOK' 

♦ -Manv large U. S. business firms now use the manual contains step-by-step lessons on good show- 
Audio-Visual Projectionist's Handbook to train manship; sells at only Sl.OO per copy, postpaid, 
employee projectionists. This graphic, illustrated Order today from Business Screen, Chicago 26. 



Canadian Producers Elect New 
Officers and Directors for 1953 

* The election of new officers and 
dircilors was carried through at 
the annual meeting of the .Associa- 
tion OF MOTIO.N I'lCTlRE ProIU'C- 

KK.s AM) Laboratories of Canada. 
The election resulted in the follow- 
ing rosier: President, S. Dean Peter- 
son of Peterson Productions. Toron- 
to, Canada: Vice-President. William 
Singleton of Associated Screen 
News Ltd.. Montreal. Quebec: and 
Secretary -Treasurer. Pierre Har- 
wood of Omega Productions. Ltd.. 
Montreal. Quebec. The following 
directors also took office: James 
Campbell of Associated Screen News 
of Montreal: Graeme Fraser of 
Crawley Films, Ottawa; Lew Parry 
of Lew Parry Productions. Van- 
couver: and D. J. Wansbrough of 
^|lrthern Pictures, Toronto. 

The guest speakers were Mr. 
Arthur Irwin of the Film Commis- 
sion of Canada and Mr. William 
Byles, Director of Radio and Tele- 
vision for ^ oung and Rubicam of 
Toronto. 

This meeting of the .Association 
Has held in the Chateau Laurier Ho- 
tel in Ottawa on Januarv 17. 



Screen Actors Guild Opens 
Chicago Office Under Ray Jones 

♦ Tin: SiKKF.N Actors Gitlo an- 
nounced the opening of a Chicago 
office under a cooperative arrange- 
ment with the Chicago local of the 
American Federation of Televi- 
sion AND Radio Artists. The Chi- 
cago branch will be housed with the 
AFTR.A staff at 102 East Hubbard 
Street in the Windy City. 

John Dales Jr.. National Execu- 
tive Secretary of S.AG. said that the 
offife will be under the direction of 
Raymond A. Jones. Executive Sec- 
retary of the Chicago local of 
AFTRA. Jones will be responsible 
for the organization of actors, sing- 
ers, announcers, and other perfonn- 
ers emploved in the production of 
motion pictures, including TV. in 
the Chicago area. He will also nego- 
tiate and administer Screen .Actors 
Guild collective bargaining con- 
tracts in Chicago and handle Chi- 
cago membership affairs and meet- 
ings. 

Kllng Negotiates for Chaplin Studio 

♦ Negutialions are underway for 
the acquisition of Charlie Chaplin's 
Hollywood film studios by Klinc 
Studios according to Robert Eirin- 
BERC. president of the Chicago and 
Hollywood television and film pro- 
ducers. The discussions are being 
carried on with Chaplin by trans- 
atlantic telephone. 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



for that IMPORTANT 

motion picture M or TV commercial 



UNITED WORLD FILMS, Inc. 

Ilg world's largest distributor 

of non-theatrical motion pictures 
||i offers you the unique experience and facilities of 

UNIVERSAL^INTERNATIONAL 

jIll world famous, major Hollywood 
B|| motion picture studio . . . staffed with 
jpl outstanding creative talent and 
IIP equipped with unparalleled technical 
studio facilities. 



For further 
information write 
for our free 
brochure. 





445 PARK AVENUE • NEW YORK 22, N. Y. 



19 5 3 P R O D r t: T I U N K K \ I t W 



35 




In 1907 . . . (long before Colleen Moore), 
Hollyryood Film started in business! 



The Original 16mm Film Ub 
still leads the rest! 



Serving Major Producers 
for over 45 years! 

We're proud of the many 
outstanding producers we 
serve, both old and new, big 
and small. Here, at Holly- 
wood Film, you get the finest 
production facilities, plus a 
"know-how" that assures 
you highest quality prints at 
reasonable prices. 

COMPLETE 
16mm Lab Service 




Musical Comedy TV Commercial pro- 
duced by Five Star Productions for 
Kellogg's Corn Flakes. Processed by 
Hollywood Film Eriterprises, Inc. 




TELEVISIO 



23 Million TV Receivers in Use 

♦ Hn llir r.id ,.f 1952 thelrlinisii.n 
in(lu?lr\ was pniducing at a going 
rate of S4 billion, as compared with 
19.5rs figure of S^ billion. .Accord- 
ing to Allen Fi. r)u Mont labora- 
tories. Inc.. which released the fig- 
ures, increasing applications of 
electronics in commercial and mili- 
tary fields during 195,3 should run 
the volume even higher to new in- 
dustry peak levels. A cumulative to- 
tal of television receiver production 
since 1946 runs to 23.6 million 
units, making an aggregate public 
total investment al retail level of 
S91 o billion. 



20 Million Without Television 
Says Zenith's Director of Sales 

♦ More than 20 million Americans 
will have virtually no TV service, 
unless subscription television is es- 
tablished to help finance small town 
stations according to H. C. BoNTiC, 
vice president and director of sales 
of Zenith Radio Corp. 

Speaking before the Advertising 
club of Boston last month Bonfig 
said that although television chan- 
nels have been allocated to 887 
cities with populations below 25.000 
there have been applications for 
television grants in only 83 of these 
cities. 

Because of the high costs of tele- 
vision. Bonfig said, national ad- 
vertisers will not be able to use 
more than the top 100 to 125 mar- 
kets for their network programs. 
This would force the small broad- 
casters to depend upon local funds, 
and '"there just isn't enough adver- 
tiser money in the small markets. 

In answer to questions about sub- 
scription television's effect on spon- 
sored program audiences Bonfig 
pointed out that the average family 
would watch subscription programs 
onlv two to four hours a week, de- 
voting the rest of their television 
time to sponsored events. The net 
result, he said, would be a tremen- 
dous increase in the audiences for 
advertisers. 

Opening of New TV Stations 
Causes Heavy Receiver Demand 

♦ Thr<iughoul 195.'5. as new tcle\i- 
sion stations open in cities through- 
out the nation, "unfrozen" by the 
FCC. heavy consumer demand for 
TV receivers is being felt. New out- 
lets at Denver and Portland, for ex- 
ample, required shipment of up- 
wards of 50,000 sets to those points. 



EWS 



First Television Link Betw/een 
U.S. and Canada Completed 

♦ \cl«mk li-kvi-iun services have 
been extended to Toronto with the 
establishment of the first regular 
video link between Canada and the 
I'nited States. Toronto's first tele- 
vision station has been linked to 
the I". S. TV network facilities of 
the American Telephone and Tele- 
graph Company's Long Lines De- 
partment at Buffalo, N. Y. by a 
radio-relav niute which crosses Lake 
Ontario. This 66-mile two section 
route, constructed by The Bell Tele- 
phone Company of Canada, initial- 
ly will provide one TV channel 
from Buffalo to Toronto. 

I . S. network programs will be 
beamed from a microwave antenna 
on top of the Franklin Street tele- 
phone building in Buffalo to a 
radio-relay station located at Font- 
hill. Ontario. Two transmitting an- 
tennas will be used on the Fonthill 
tower to relay programs across the 
lake to Toronto. Each antenna will 
flash the same signals but at dif- 
ferent frequencies. Engineers of the 
Bell Telephone Company of Canada 
have taken this precaution to insure 
transmission during periods of fad- 
ing of radio signals over the large 
expanse of water. 

Construction is under way on 12 
intermediate microw^ave towers east 
of Toronto for interconnection of 
Montreal's new' television station to 
the L'. S. Network. Upon comple- 
tion of this link, early this Spring, 
residents in Canada's largest city 
will also receive telecasts from the 
United States, Meanwhile, the Cana- 
dian Broadcasting Company plans 
to telecast U. S, programs in Mont- 
real by Kinescope. 

Also announced recently was the 
addition of two television stations at 
Youngstown. Ohio, making network 
programs now available to 118 tele- 
vision stations in 74 cities in the 
United States. 



WRITER-DIRECTOR 
Available 

15 years experience in mo- 
tion pictures, slidefilms, and 
T-V, covering all types — indus- 
trial, institutional, sales promo- 
tion, sales training, safety, 
documentary, nature, outdoor 
sports. Also films for U.S. 
Navy, U.S. Air Force and other 
government agencies. 

Vi rite Box 53-lA 
BisiNESs Screen 

7064 Sheridan Road, Chicago 26, III. 



>C.REEN MAGAZINE 



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Inquire about the Quality and Service 
on these productions in 1952 

All processed at TRI ART 

in 35mm Eastman Negative-Positive Color 

ir 35mm color release prints 

ir Kodachrome Printing 

ir 16mm Kodachrome enlarged to 35mm 
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^ 35mm filmstrips 

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• SALES TRAINING 
"... I con.sider the job you did on the 
Admiral film series, 'Lines and Fines,' 
the most outstanding training job I 
have ever encountered. The plan, in 
spite of the overwhelming complexities 
involving film, brochures, question 
sheets, recordings and flip charts, was 
so intelligently organized that it has 
brought tremendous response and re- 
sults from our distributors throughout 
the country . . . . " 

Seymour Mintz 

Vice President and Dir. of Advertising, 

Admiral Corporation 



• DOCUMENTARY 

"... the way you blended the widely 
diversified problems of our extensive 
operation of over 200 chemicals and 
products into one flowing, beautifully 
photographed film, 'The Tennessee 
Story,' far exceeded even our greatest 
expectations . . . . " 

M. H. Nabors 

Vice President, Tennessee Products 

and Chemical Corporation 



• SALES PROMOTION 

"Here's our order for still another 25 
prints of 'Health and Your Wealth.' 
We are getting tremendous reception 
in the field for your well-written and 
photographed film, and I know it will 
promote sales of Mitchell Air Condi- 
tioners." 

Howard Haas 

Advertising and Sales Promotion Mgr., 

Mitchell Manufacturing Co. 

Advertising Knowmamhip Plus 
Hollywood Showmanship 



MOTION PICTURES • TELEVISION FILMS • 
SLIDE FILMS • PHOTOGRAPHY • 
ADVERTISING AND EDITORIAL ART • 
DISPLAYS • SALES TRAINING AND 
MAINTENANCE MANUALS 



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Sound Slidefilm 

■^ The increasing success of the automatic low frequency 
system is making sound sHdefilm one of the fastest grow- 
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selling. 

LOW FREQUENCY "30/50" AUTOMATIC 

The low frequency "30/50" technique of automatic 
sound slidefilm has become the accepted system in a 
large number of major industries and organizations. 

OVER 1,000,000 "30/50" SLIDEFILMS 

Producers and their clients have distributed more than 
one million copies of automatic "30/50" slidefilms on 
a wide variety of subjects. 

OVER 20,000 "30/50" PROJECTORS 

A simple demonstration will show why there are more 

than 20,000 automatic sound slidefilm projectors in 

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WRITE OR MAIL COUPON TODAY! 



Color Films Find Favor With 16mm Audiences 
and Improved Processes Lead to Better Results 




jly iLone ^laie. 

Wi WORLD'S URGEST PRODUCER OF SOUND SLIDEFILM PROJECTORS I 



•^ riirrt* were nut too many changes 
in color in 1952. There was more 
of it- in fart — some films were 
made in color - willy-nilly — just be- 
cause it seemed to be the thing to 
do. and because some producers 
shy away from using anything else, 
not Itecause there was any sound 
justification for it. This is true, 
however — the audience for 16mm 
films likes color, and will seek it 
out in any cases where it has choice 
of selection. 

The film stock is getting better, 
and photographers find they can do 
more with it than they would have 
tried in the past. Figuratively, they 
now shoot it in a dark coal bin — 
and somehow it seems to come out 
right. 

Relialiility Is Big Asset 

Everyone uses advanced types of 
color film exclusivelv. and the gar- 
ish old amateur type was seldom 
encountered. Producers found that 
reliabilily was the chief qualifica- 
tion they sought in color: original 
material that was always accurate 
whether from one can or another. 
Color producers and laboratories 
were not impressed by superlative 
test films, samples, or a few thou- 
sand feet used for special purposes 
— they wanted stock that was as 
alike as newly minted pennies — 
whether obtained in Seattle or 
Miami. 

35mm negative-positive became 
increasingly important. Blow-up ar- 
tists in Hollywood and New York 
were turning out 35mm enlarge- 
ments that passed critical eyes most 
successfully. Old 16mm color foot- 
age was turned into 35mm material 
for commercial use in theatres. 
One car manufacturer almost satur- 
ated the country with a film made 
this way. Thousands of sponsored 
theatrical playlets were shot on 
35mm negative. Some far-sighted 
advertisers got their TV commer- 
cials photographed in 35ram nega- 
tive color ( it makes excellent 
black and white prints I for 
use if and when color television 
comes on the scene. Filmstrip users 
found negative-positive color not 
only as satisfactory as reversal sys- 
tems, but a good deal cheaper. 
Laboratories Important Fartor 

Color laboratories — printers and 
processors — became an even more 
important factor in the business. It 
was rare to see a "pink" or a "blue" 
color print. The independent re- 
search and technical advances of 
these firms has developed to such an 
extent that their own errors are 
almost non-existent and photogra- 



ph) errors, even serious ones, car 
be corrected with excellent results. 
What will 19.53 .show? From all 
indications it will mean that any- 
thing less than absolute perfection 
will never be tolerated. It will prob- 
ably the year that 16mm negative- 
positive color stock will be intro- 
duced, and might even be widely 
used by year's end. ^ 

Ansco Creates Professional Sales 
Department in Home Office Change 

♦ Ansco. Binghamton. N. Y.. a di- 
vision of General Aniline & Film 
Corporation, announces important 
changes in the structure of the com- 
pan\'*s home office sales organiza- 
tion. 

AcKjrding to William Balch. 
general sales manager, two new de- 
partments are being created: Pro- 
fessional Sales and Amateur Sales. 
Graphic Sales and X-Ray Sales De- 
partments have been in operation 
for some time. All four depart- 
ments will operate under the direc- 
tion of R. M. Dunn, assistant gen- 
eral sales manager. 

rhe new Amateur Sales Depart- 
ment will be headed by Mr. Harold 
R. Dean as Manager. Mr. R. A. 
Streit has been named Marketing 
Manager. Dealer Division. Mr. 
Claude Pilger has been appointed 
Manager of Amateur Sales Promo- 
tion. One additional position. Mar- 
keting Manager. Distributor Divi- 
sion, will be filled in the near fu- 
ture. 

A similar organization is in ef- 
fect in the Professional Sales De- 
partment, where Mr. Reeve will co- 
ordinate the operation in addition 
to his current duties as Marketing 
Administrator. Mr. J. B. Titcomb 
has been named Marketing Mana- 
ger. Finisher Division, and Mr. 
Winston Schlag has been appointed 
ti> Marketing Manager. Studio Di- 
vision. Mr. Donald Storing has 
been appointed Manager of Profes- 
sional ."^ales Promotion. 

Uses of "Metallizing" Illustrated 

♦ The process of spraying thin coat- 
ings of metal on worn or damaged 
machine parts and base metals is 
described in Metallizing, — Its Prac- 
tical Applications. The 28-minute 
sound and color film pictures jobs 
which range from worn or damaged 
cranks and shafts to the restoration 
of backup rolls at a large steel mill, 
at a saving of S125.000 each. The 
sponsor. Metallizing Engineering 
Co.. Inc. is handling distribution. 
For information write to 38-14 30 
St.. Long Island City 1. 



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FOR OUALITY 

l)v engineers who first introduced high 
({uaUtv magnetic tape recording in the 
United States and first used the system 
nationally in 1947 for the Crosby radio 
programs. Complete Western Electric 
sound system for density and area tracks, 
and magnetic film. Electroprinting. 

by specialists for years in meeting the 
exacting requirements of color reproduc- 
tion for nationally famous food products, 
such as Del Monte Brand. 

by the leaders in the closetl circuit system 
of TV picture and sound recording . . . 
used for the Standard Hour TV programs. 

W. A. Palmer Films, Inc. 

611 HOWARD STREET YUkon 6-5961 
Established San Francisco 1936 



United World Films Awarded 
Distribution of Government Films 

♦ I M|] II Wiiiii.i) I'li.MS has again 
befii auariii-d llir ilistribulioii of 
25,000 L.S. Government films and 
filnislrips. The Federal Supply 
Service of the General Services Ad- 
ministration awards this contract 
annually on a competitive bid basis. 

U. S. Government films include 
those prepared by 20 different agen- 
cies of the Federal Government 
such as the Department of State, 
Public Health Service and the 
United States Army. Films in this 
category range from highly techni- 
cal studies of specialized skills to 
world geography and the famous 
Why We Figlil series. 

Industrial organizations, em- 
ployee training groups, public and 
private schools, and various study 
programs use the teaching value of 
these government films in training 
programs. 

Some films of the State Depart- 
ment and other Federal Agencies 
which have been produced for 
over-seas educational training pro- 
grams are later released on the 
American market through I'nited 
World. New releases are forthcom- 
ing at frequent intervals from one 
or more government agencies pro- 
ducing and using training films. 

Linited World sells these govern- 
ment films. They may also be rented 
through local film libraries, com- 
mercial organizations and other 
sources. 

Write ITW at 1445 Park Avenue. 
New York 29. N. Y.. for the com- 
plete catalog. 
French Line Signs Regency 

♦ Regexcy Productions. Inc. will 
produce a 20 minute color film fea- 
turing the French Lines' luxury 
craft. Liberte and He de France, on 
their Atlantic crossings. Jo Schaef- 
fer will be in charge of production 
for the film which is planned to be 
more than a routine travelogue. 
British Air Show 

In New Shell Film 

♦ The famed annual 
air show at Farnbor- 
ough. England, is the 
subject of a new Shell 
Oil Co. 2 6 - m i n u t e 
sound film titled High- 
lighls of Farnborough, 
1952. The picture in- 
cludes air-to-air shots 
of such planes as the 
Hawker ""Hunter" and 
Supermarine ".Swift 
fighters breaking 
through the sonic bar- 
rier I with actual sound 
recordings). Film can 
be borrowed from .Shell 
offices in New York 
and San Francisco. 



Value of "Short Short" Films 
in Medical Education Analyzed 

♦ Vital iiiMlriliution< to be made 
to teaching b\ using "short short' 
films are discus-sed in a series of 
articles in the February issue of 
The Journal of Medical Educa- 
tion. ""Short short" films range in 
length from approximately two to 
ten minutes, and are used to illus- 
trate a particular teaching point. 

The special section, ""The Short 
Motion Picture for Medical School 
Classroom Instruction." carries im- 
plications for all teaching, and 
serves as a guide for the medical 
teacher who is interested in aug- 
menting his teaching in an individu- 
al way. 

Historically, the series shows, 
the short film is not new. It was 
tl>e forerunner of today's longer 
educational medical film which has 
grown increasingly complex. While 
invaluable in many instances, the 
longer film is not adaptable for the 
personalized needs of the medical 
instructor. Because of their brevity, 
short films may be correlated easily 
with the teaching program. 

Producers can get double value 
from standard-length medical films 
by planning and producing them 
with an eye to extracting short sec- 
tions for day-to-day use in the class- 
room, says Dr. David S. Ruhe, edi- 
tor of the series and director of the 
Medical Audio-Visual Institute of 
the Association of .American Medi- 
cal Colleges. Certain commercial 
films are also a possible source of 
short film material. Medical teachers 
with a good amateur understanding 
of film making will find it feasible 
to produce their own brief films 
perfectly adapted to their purposes. 

Film adaptation and experimen- 
tation, of course, presuppose own- 
ing the film rather than renting it. 
The budgetary addition of a sum 
for film purchase is recommended 
for everv school. 9' 



Chicago Producer Seeking 

WRITER 

Minimum of five year's experi- 
ence writing; motion pictures 
and slidefilms for recognized 
commercial film producer. Send 
abstract and salary require- 
ments. All replies strictly con- 
fidential. 

VOGUE-WRIGHT STUDIOS 

469 East Ohio Sirert 
Chicago 11. Illinois 



BISINESS SCREEN M.\GAZINE 




For any successful special purpose photographic program 

FOLLOW THE COURSE 
OF THE NATION'S LEADERS 

The measurement of success is results — attested 
by over 300 national business and industrial 
organizations — clients of Richie Productions. Our 
broad experience of over 20 years in close con- 
tact with Industry, Advertising, and Sales Promo- 
tion, has developed and cemented these successful 
relationships through creation and production of 
outstanding motion pictures and still photography. 




ROBERT YARNALL RICHIE PRODUCTIONS, INC 



Pictures i or Business and Industry 
9 WEST 61st STREET, NEW YORK 23 




SOME REPRESENTATIVE NAMES 
FROM OUR CLIENT FILE 

AC Sparkplug Division of Generol Motors 

Alasko Airlines 

Alils-Chalmers Manufacturing Company 

American Brake Shoe Company 

American Brass Company 

American Cyanamid Company 

American Enka Corporation 

American Locomotive Company 

American Metals Company, Ltd. 

American Meter Company 

American Optical Company 

American Republics Line 

American Sugar Refining Compony 

American Type Founders, Inc. 

Ansco Division, 

General Aniline Corporation 
Arabian American Oil Company 
Armco Steel Corporation 
• 

Badger Process Division 

of Stone & Webster Engineering Corporation 
Bahrein Petroleum Compony 
Barium Steel Corporation 
Baroid Division, Notional Lead Compony 
Beech Aircroft Corporation 
Bell Aircroft Corporation 
Bethlehem Steel Company 
Boeing Airplane Company 
Bridgeport Brass Company 
Brown Instrument Division, 

Minneapolis-Honeywell Company 
Bucyrus-Erie Compony 
The Budd Compony 

Buick Motors Division of General Motors 
The Bullord Company 
Bulova Watch Company 

• 
Colifornio Texas Oil Company, Ltd. 
Carl Brothers Company 
Chevrolet Motors Division of General Motors 
Chicago Bridge & Iron Company 
Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Railroad Company 
Chicago & Southern Airlines 
Chrysler Corporation 
Cincinnati Milling Mochine Company 
Climax Molybdenum Company 
Commercial Solvents Corparotion 
Corning Glass Works 
Cuniss-Wright Aircraft Corporation 




AdJitiothtl luima in American 
Industry avaibhie upon requist. 




COLOR AND DENSITY S^HO TISTER «<hI S«hI- 

single frame pri.il tetft with 
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speod ond in determining th« proper proceuing techniques to 
control vorioblet of contrasts. 



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NAVA Advisory Commitlee Elects 
Two New Members for 1953 

♦ More than 1 1(1 a(l\:>.()i> incmliers 
of (lie \ali(inal Amliu-Visual As- 
sociation elected two new members 
and re-elected a third to the Ad- 
visory Mcnihcrs' Liaison Committee 
of that dealer trade organization. 
The new members are Howard 
Marx of the Ampro Corporation 
and Robert L. Shoemaker of the 
DnKane Corporation. W. A. Moen. 
Bell and Howell Company, was re- 
elected. 

Three alternates were also chosen 
in the annual election, including 
E. N. Nelsen of Coronet Films, Inc.. 
Vi . H. Gar\e\. Jr.. of the Society 
for Visual Education. Inc., and 
Harold Fischer of Compco Corp. 

Members of the liaison committee 
during 1952 included Mr. Moen, 
E. X. Nelsen. and Gil Heck of the 
Da-Lite Screen Company, who is 
now serving on the board of gov- 
ernors for the 195.3 National In- 
stitute for Audio-Visual Selling to 
be held JuK 26-.'?0 at Indiana Uni- 
versity. Bloomington. Ind. 

The .'\dvisory Members' Liaison 
Committee to the N.AV.A board of 
directors was established in JuK. 
1950. The committee meets with the 
board of directors at each of its 
meetings to advise the board on 
matters affecting advisor)' members, 
and organize programs. Committee 
members do not vote in the meet- 
ings as sole voting control of the 
association is maintained by dealer 
members of board of directors. 

During 19.52 the liaison commit- 
tee organized six committees includ- 
ing outside business consultant 
service committee. Howard Marx, 
chairman: selection and training of 
salesmen committee. Herb VIvers of 
Charles Beseler Co.. chairman : co- 
operation with the department of 
audio-visual instruction of the Na- 
tional Education Association Com- 
mittee. Ellsworth Dent of Coronet 
Films. Inc.. chairman: cooperation 
with religious organizations com- 
mittee. William H. Garvev. chair- 
man: cooperation with industry 
committee. Robert L. Shoemaker, 
chairman: and cooperative national 
advertising committee, chairman to 
be announced. 



Stole Dept. Gets Cornell Film 

♦ The U.S. State Deartment has 
contracted with Cornell Film 
CoMP.ANV for the exclusive use of a 
short film. The Sea Lion Baseball 
Team, in its world wide information 
service. The film, one of a series 
of Wonderland Tales, produced by 
J. D. Trop. « ill be used in .V) differ- 
ent language versions. 



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619 West 54th Street, New York 19, N. Y. JUdson 6-0360 



Production Lines 

Columbia Records Reports 12% 
Sales Increase for Past Year 

♦ (^oi.iMiiiA HhxoROS, Inc. has re- 
|j(irlc<l thill 1052 was one of the best 
sales years in its history, surpass- 
ing 1951 totals by 12%, which is 
the largest increase registered by 
any major manufacturer. 

Ciilunilpia's Transcription Divi- 
sion nolcrl a good year in sales of 
slidefilni and radio transcriptions, 
as well as in pressings for smaller 
record companies. 

During 1952, the Transcription 
Division introduced the 7-78, a 
novel recorded sales device. A 7 
inch nonbreakable 78 rpm record, 
the 7-78 is designed to supplant 
conventional printed mailing pieces 
with a more effective spoken mes- 



Color Reproduction Discussed 
at SMPTE Central Section Meeting 

♦ "Color ("ontinuity and Reproduc- 
tion" was the subject of a paper 
presented recently by Gordon Ray 
to the Central Section of the Society 
of Motion Picture and Television 
Engineers. Mr. Ray. a staff member 
at the Reid H. Ray Film Industries 
Inc.. St. Paul. Minn., described the 
building of a motion picture or 
slidefilm with reference to color, de- 
sign, and continuity of the various 
scenes. 

Also presented at the Chicago 
meeting was an analysis of "Pro- 
duction Practices for Television" by 
William P. Kusack, chief engineer 
for TV station WBKB. Mr. Kusack 
pointed out that good visual tele- 
vision reproduction necessitates op- 
eration within boundaries of tech- 
nical characteristics. The CBS tele- 
vision transcription film. Television 
Lighting, was used to demonstrate 
these technical boundaries. 

Telepix Opens New Studios 

♦ Opening ceremonies for recently 

completed studios of 

Telepix Corporation 

were held on February 
10 at 1515 N. Western 
Avenue in Hollywood. 
Primarily designed for 
a growing television 
clientele, the new fa- 
cilities include one 
main stage 50 x 95' 
with many unusual de- 
sign features. Robert 
Newman is president 
of the West Coast or- 
ganization which has 
Chicago representation 
by Dick Lewks Sti- 
Dios in that citv. 



American Airlines Plans NY Film 

♦ Script consultations have begun 
nil a new lilni about New York City 
that will be produced by Dynamic 
Films, Inc., in cooperation with 
American Airlines, Inc. The film, 
to be aimed at general theatrical re- 
lea.se in the late spring, will be pho- 
tographed on Eastman .'iSnnn nega- 
tive-positive color, and show the 
city as an attractive year-round va- 
cation spot for the whole family. 

Aware of the many films already 
produced on the subject, Ralph 
Schoolman, who drew the script as- 
signment from Dynamic, is seeking 
a novel approach that will allow 
him to employ the camera as a 
"walker in the city." 

Shows Production of Die Blocks 

♦ .Sonielhing More Tluin Sleel is 
the title of a 16mm film which 
illustrates the making of die blocks 
and shear knives. Sponsor is the 
Heppenstall Co.. 4620 Hatfield St., 
Pittsburgh 1. Pa., manufacturer of 
steel forgings. 

Kodak's Glenn Matthews Writes 
Article for Photography Yearbook 

♦ Glenn E. Matthews, technical 
editor of Eastman Kodak's re- 
search laboratories, is the author of 
an illustrated article entitled "Pho- 
tography in the Service of Man- 
kind." appearing in "Photography 
Year-Book. 1953." Published an- 
nually in England since 1935, 
copies of the year book recently ar- 
rived in the U. S. Mr. Matthews 
cites many uses of photography, 
ranging from the study of astron- 
omy to the examination of minute, 
atomic distances. 

In several pages on industrial 
and technical photography, he re- 
ports that only a third of photo 
sales today are for amateur uses. 
.\bout 67 per cent of the uses rep- 
resent commercial, industrial, pub- 
lishing, radiographic and medical, 
motion picture, and scientific ap- 
nlications. 



SPECIAL SERVICES 

ble charges • 



EDITORIAL: The Greatest Value to 
'YOUR STORY" is Smooth Editorial 
Timing . . . Svmpnthetic Understand- 
ing of "YOUR STORY" theme . . . 
Sensitive Apjirerintion oj "YOUR 
STORY" mood. 

PHODITCTION: Suh-Contrnct work of- 
fered to the ('ommiriinl I'rodiieer. 

GEORGE HALLIGAN 

Motion Pictures 

7934 Santa Moi 



Hollywood 9-7962 
d., Hollywood, Cal. 



H I S 1 N E S S S C R K E N M .\ G .\ Z I N E 



A thousand words 
about pictures. . . 

We started Information Productions, Inc., a little more than a 
year ago. This is our first advertisement in Business Screen, ^^'e 
have several reasons for running it. 

First, we are grateful to this magazine for devoting a picture-and- 
text spread, several months ago, to our film, "The Salesman." 
And we are proud that Business Screen has just named "The 
Salesman" one of the best films of 1952. 

Second, we want to thank the clients who have seen us through 
our first full calendar vear and have given us a running start into 
1953. 

Third, as professionals engaged primarily in translating other 
people's ideas into motion pictures, we relish any opportunity to 
sound off about niir o:vn ideas. 



We dislike, for instance, the gobbledygook of film-making. Our 
preference is for non-technical talk — for helping everv' client un- 
derstand exactly what we are doing, whv and how we are doing 
it and how much it costs. 

Being new, we have been in a mood to challenge cliches. We feel 
sure, for example, that one picture is not necessarily worth one 
thousand words. Original thinking frequently finds expression in 
words and there is no substitute for original thinking in film- 
making. The most magnificent camera work can't save a banal 
idea. ,. ^ ^^ 

We do not accept some other accepted film ideas, particularly 
those which exalt the physical excellence of picture and sound 
unduly. 

We are inclined to think that high standards of picture and sound 
should be taken for granted — today. 

We have admired certain films which were technically not very 
impressive, but which put their message across effectively. And 
we lose contact very fast with a slick, expensive film which has 
nothing to say. .y^ ,i ,i 

We seem to be just as interested in the objective of a film as in the 
film itself. We like films which tell their ston,' and then stop. We 
suspect that three or four $10,000 films can sometimes do a bigger 
job than one ?150,000 epic, though not necessarily always. 

We don't like to see one film try to do too much. 

On the other hand, we believe very emphatically that there is al- 
most no area of communications — no aspect of training, selling 
or informing — where the motion picture medium cannot pla\- an 
important part. 



We hope to continue to develop not only new films but new uses 
for films. For opportunities to do both during our first year in busi- 
ness, we are deeply grateful to the following: 

Thf. New York State Thruw av Authority , for zvhom we have 
produced a continuing series of film reports to the people of New 
York on the conception, construction and significance of the great 
A'ew York State Thruwav. 

CBS 1 ELEVisiON , for whom we helped create the many motion- 
picture versions of the "CBS Eye" — seen more times by more 

millinns of people than anything else on television. 

P'ord Foundation TV-Radio Workshop , for whose Sunday- 
afternoon television program, "Omnibus," we are producing a 
wide variety of film features. 

Rkmin(;t()n Rand, Inc., The Greyhound Lines and American 

Machine and Fijundrv Company , with whom zee have collabo- 
rated in preparation and production of special features for 
"Omnibus." 

Fortune Magazine , in cooperation with whose Editors and Ad- 
vertising Staff we produced "The'Salesman." (Scores of leading 
U.S. companies have paid $100 apiece to show this "sure cure for 
conventionitis" to their sales staffs.) 

Crusade for Freedom , whose annual film reports to the public 
for both 1951 and 1052 — along with a number of TV spots and 
announcements — were produced b\ Information Productions. 

Standard Oil Company (N.J.) , whose television commercials 
fa few of which we produced ) won this year's Sylvania Award. 

The Committee for Political Education and Information, 
sponsors of "Henry Lends a Hand," a training filvi in story form 
for volunteer political workers, widely shown during the recent 
Presidential campaign. 

The Borden Company and James Lees & Sons Company, for 

whom we produced special convention film features. 

Science Pictures, Inc., with whom we have collaborated this 
past year on scientific and industrial films for: Owens-Corning 
Fiberglas Corporation; Chase Brass if Copper Company; Na- 
tional Foundation for Infantile Paralysis; Phelps Dodge Copper 
Products Corporation; .American Physical Therapy Association. 



Wc 



w elcome and give prompt attention to your inquir\'. 



ALFRED BUTTERflElD AND THOMAS H WOIF 



INFORMATION 




PRODUCTIONS, INC. 



5 East 57th Street • New York 22, N. Y. • ELdorodo 5-1722 



19,13 PRODI (I ion K E\ IF.iS 



SPECIALISTS 
IN COLOR 



YOUR ASSURANCE 
OF BETTER 16mm 
COLOR PRINTS 



Lon;; training, and special ahility in a particular line, defines a 
specialist. Color Reproduction Company believes only specialists 
do the finest work. That's why this company has always main- 
tained a policy of specializing exclusively in 16mm Kodachrome 
duplications.* These years of specialization mean finer quality 
prints and dependable jast service! Send your next print order 
to Color Reproduction Company for guaranteed satisfaction. 



•EXCEPTION: Black and while 



Is from color prints for TV projeclions. 





7936 Santa Monita Blvd,, Hollywood 46, California 

Telephone: HILLSIDE 8225 



THIRD EDITION OF THE INDEX OF TRAINING FILMS NOW AVAILABLE 



♦ The Third Edition of The Index of Training 
Films, widely-used and authoritative reference 
listing all free-loan, rental and low-cost purchase 
sound films and slidefilms available for industrial 



training and vocational classroom use is now avail- 
able. Nearly 2800 titles are listed, together with 
complete sources. The Index Hsts at only S2.00. 
Order today from Business Screen, Chicago 11. 



3oa) Manufacturers Launch Film 
Program to Include 13 Pictures 

■^f I lie first l»i> motion picture 
films in a l.'^-unit series on recrea- 
tional boating designed for televi- 
sion and motion picture theatre 
showings alike were delivered last 
month to the National Association 
of Engine and Boat Manufacturers 
by Victor Kayfelz Productions. Inc., 
the producer. 

Covering all phases of boating 
and marine sports, the series will 
be in color for showings to boating 
clubs, civic groups and the general 
theatre public and in black and 
white for television. The series is 
designed to acquaint audiences with 
boating pleasures and facilities 
available throughout the country. 
Each of the 16mm films is ISVl;- 
minutes long and is planned to fit 
the standard 15-minute TV show. 
The entire scries is scheduled to be 
completed by 1954. 

Titled "Water World" Series 

Known as the Water World series, 
the first two productions were pre- 
viewed at the annual meeting of 
the NAEBM in New York. Jan. 16. 
during the 4.3rd annual National 
Motor Boat Show. Produced by the 
Kayfetz organization under the di- 
rection of H. A. Bruno and Asso- 
ciate*, public relations counsel to 
the \AEBM. the two fibiis were 
Sea Fever and Holiday Afloat. These 
are scheduled for TV showings 
within the next 30 days. 

Sea Fever describes the adven- 
tures of a small boy who wanders 
into a marina and loses himself in 
dreams of the romance of the sea. 
Successively he is offered and ac- 
cepts rides in an outboard runabout, 
a sailboat and an inboard cruiser. 
He meets another boy who is build- 
ing an eight-foot kit boat on the 
dock and the film ends with the two 
boys launching this small craft and 
putting out to sea on their own. 
Amateur actors for this film were 
selected from among residents of 
the Port Washington-Manhasset area 
of Long Island, through NAEBM 
cooperation. Photography on this 
film was completed in three days. 
i Other Films Described 

Holiday .Afloat concerns the va- 
cation of a family of five in an out- 
board cruiser on the Great Lakes 
last summer. It shows the high- 
lights of the cruise taken by Mr. and 
Mrs. Ed Hodge and their three 
youngsters up to Mackinac Island. 
The film includes footage from the 
"home movies" made by the Hodges 
during the three weeks aboard the 
cruiser. 

Already in production for the 
series are Fishing, U.S.A. and Ski 
Antics, a film on water skiing. W 



BUSINESS SCREEN .M.\t;AZINE 




'<m. ipMii^teA.^ 



PRODUCED WITH 

COMPETENCE 
SENSITIVITY 
TECHNICAL EXCELLENCE 



SINCE 1932 




WILLARD PICTURES INC. 

45 WEST 45th STREET NEW YORK 36, N. Y. 

LUxemberg 2-0430 

"'' ana Uxelatea Visual llieaia 



19 53 PRODUCTION REVIEW 



O/i the Kecord 



iJjINCE 1953, and again during 1952, it lias been our privilege to make 
a sizeable number of motion pictures for Industiy. 

During tlie past year, for example, we produced one or more films for 
the American Cancer Society, American Gas and Electric Company, 
American Telephone & Telegraph Company, Atlantic City Electric 
Company, Cast Iron Pipe Research Association, Elgin National Watch 
Company, Ethyl Corporation, Merck & Co., Inc., McGraw Hill Book 
Company, Inc., National Board of Fire Underwriters, The Texas Com- 
pany, U. S. Department of State, Air Force and Navy, and a consider- 
able number of television commercials for N. W. Ayer & Son, Inc., 
Benton & Bowles, Inc., Young & Rubicam, Inc., and others. 

In appraising the qualifications of a producing organization, no yard- 
stick can take the place of the question, "What have you done? On 
that basis we solicit opportunities with prospective clients. 

Send for ->t Zrew j/acls -yvbouf ^yViiJio" 



II nun n ninnnimDnnniiniiimr 



iiniiiiiiinniniiiiinniiiiiiniiiiiiiuiiiniiiiiiiniiiiiiiniiiniunniniiniinniniuniniiiininiininiiiiiiiinniniiinninw 

AtDIO PRODUCTIONS, INC. 

Film Center Building 

630 NINTH AVENUE NEW YORK 36, N . Y. 

SO BUSINESSSCREENMAG.iZINE 



THE NATION'S ESTABLISHED business 
film producing companies bad a gross an- 
nual sales volume of over S50 million in 
1952, according to national survey figures com- 
piled for the second successive year by the Edi- 
tors of Business Screen. An increase in business 
over the -S45 million total reported for 1951 was 
further verified by wider employment of per- 
manent personnel, increased material purchases, 
and by the sizeable number of motion pictures 
and slidefilms completed in the past year. 

162 producing companies in all sections of the 
country were listed in this \ ear's Production 
Review section I pages 56 to 91 ) and of these 
126 have complied with the minimum require- 
ments for a detailed listing of their company's 
services, facilities and recent business activity, 
as evidence of their ability. 

These physical survey figures are based on 
detailed analysis of fiscal and physical activity 
supplied by 64 leading companies, as compared 
to 55 companies furnishing last year's figures. 
Two other companies entered the field in 1952 
and were unable to furnish any figures. Eight 
concerns in Canada were also surveved and the 
most active also supplied physical statistics. 

Although television film production accounted 
for nearly S4 million in sales for 4.'^ of the com- 
panies reporting this phase of their activity. TV 
was not yet a major sales item, as compared to 
more than §-34 million reported by 64 of the 
companies for business films, exclusive of tele- 
vision. Indications were that more important 
commercials and longer program fare were be- 
ing entrusted to these experienced producers of 
sponsored films. 

This year's survey questionaire was broadened 
to include such subjects as the numlier of in- 
dividual subjects produced, the numbers of prints 
required, and sales practices such as progress 
payments, cash discounts, projection sales, and 
distribution activity. 

Briefly, the nation's most active film com- 
panies turned out more than 1500 sound motion 
pictures for nontheatrical exhibition; over 4.000 
television playlets and short commercials. 51 of 
the companies reported 287 slidefilms. About 
460 of the motion pictures and 221 of the sound 
slidefilms were in color. 

48 out of 51 business film producers required 
their clients to make progress payments at vari- 
ous stages of production: the most usual custom 
was to require these payments on a .13' •(''r basis 
(24 out of 48 companies reporting) : 17 others 
worked on a 25' c pajinent schedule basis. Cash 
discounts are not given on production work by 
45 out of 46 companies reporting; 39 out of 41 
also reported no cash discounts on prints. 

Few of these companies (only 14 out of 4<" 
reporting) provided film distribution; .36 out of 
63 reported the sale of projection equipment to 
their clients. 

These were the outward physical signs of solid 
progress toward greater financial stability for 
most of the companies. Many of the established 
firms were also moving toward some form of 
producer organization. The need for further 
identification of their capable, creative services 
was made apparent by the indiscriminate listing 
of more than 700 such firms in telephcme and 
trade directories in just three of the nation's 
large centers in the past year. 5}" 




Production Survey 

THE SECOND AiNALAL REVIEW OF PRODUCER FACILITIES AND SALES 



SURVEY OF PRODUCTION IN 1952 
Advance Statistical Siuimiary of the 
Business Fihn Industry in the U. S. 



TEN Areas of the U. S. are covered in this 
second annual statistical survey. Detailed 
reports were received from 64 of the 126 "key' 
companies who also supplied complete listing 
data. Projections are based on the most careful 
calculations, using lowest average figures and 
discounting largest facilities reported. 

1. Number of permanent employees on the 
studio rosters during 1952: 

64 U. S. Companies Reportinc: 1944 employees 
were permanently engaged in the creation, pro- 
duction, processing, sales, and management of 
business and television film production in these 
studios. 

Projection: based on the low mean average of 
10 emplovees per company (deducting larger 
riimpanies I we estimate total permanent em- 
pli>vment in the key 126 companies filing com- 
plete 1952 listing returns as approximately 2564 
persons. 

2. Number of part-time employees engaged 
during 1952 l not including talent I : 

63 r. S. Companies Reporting: 2792 persons 




were hired by these companies as technicians, 
specialists, etc. In previous years (1951 figures) 
talent was included but this figure was purposely 
not requested for 1952 in order to get a more 
accurate base. 

Projection: for the remaining 63 out of 126 
key companies, we estimate an average of 10 
part-time workers since these are smaller com- 
panies using a fairly larger number of non-per- 
manent technicians, etc. in the year. Total part- 
time employment is estimated at .3422 persons. 



3. The total capitalization of business and 
television film producers active in 1952: 

55 V. S. Companies Reporting: capitalization 
reporting of these companies sharply increased 
with 17 additional firms furnishing data on 
1952. S10.61 5,751 was the capitalization of 55 
firms. 32 of the reporting companies were capi- 
talized at S50.000 or over: 19 were capitalized 
at .5100.000 or over. 

Projectio.n: by careful calculation, discounting 
Iht very largest capitalizations as in 1951, an 
estimate of the total capitalization of 126 key 
companies would approximate S15.000.000. 



4. The gross volume of sales i all items i in 
the year. 1952: 

63 U. S. Companies Reporting: 838,861,000 in 
gross sales were reported by exactly one-half of 
the 126 key companies. 22 of these concerns 
had gross sales of over S200,000 in 1952; of 
these there were 13 companies with gross sales 
of over S500.000. 47 of the total 63 companies 
reporting had gross sales of SIOO.OOO or more. 
Television film sales accounted for S3.946.2Sl 
of the S38 million dollar total among the 44 
companies reporting this figure. 19 companies 
did S50,000 or better in TV film sales during 
19.52 but the main item was still regular business 
film production which still accounted for over 
.S30.000.000 of these sales. 

Projection: careful calculation of the estimated 
gross sales of the unreported 63 companies 
would bring the induslrv's total gross sales I for 
onlv 126 companies! to S5L161.00O. In 1951, 
116 companies did approximately S-15,000,000. 
These figures would be greatly expanded by the 
inclusion of direct lab purchases, commercial 
distribution expenditures, and direct projection 
c<|uipnient purchases, etc. originated by film pro- 
grams created by these companies. The gross 
sales of several hundred miscellaneous and free- 
(contimed on the following pace) 



19 5 3 r R O I C T I O > K K \ I E W 



51 



Production Survey: 



(continued from the preceding page) 

lance fibn producers not qualified for Production 
Review listings would possibly increase this fig- 
ure another 10'~( also. However, the 126 com- 
panies accepted for listing do the bulk of the 
I'lininurcial film production business. 



5. Tlie value of studio physical eiiuipnient 
as of December 31. 1952:' 

59 V. S. Companies Reporting: $4,509,145 is 
the estimate of value placed on studio physical 
equipment by these companies at the close of 
business. 1952. This includes studio and labora- 
tory fixtures, cameras, lighting, and such specific 
items required for professional production. 
Projection: value in excess of $10,500,000 
would cover the physical equipment assets of 
126 key companies listed in this Production Re- 
view. Additional millions of dollars are. how- 
ever, invested in laboratories and service or- 
ganizations carrving through outside and relat- 
ed services of the nontheatrical film medium. 



6. Total 1952 expenditures for materials: 

44 U. S. Companies Reporting: $6,365,630 was 
the amount tabulated from the survey returns 
of these companies and representing their out- 
side purchases of materials and supplies during 
the past year. 

Projection: over $10,000,000 is a low estimate 
of the material purchase expenditures made by 
the 126 kev companies surveyed. 



7. Film consumption: dollar purchases of 
raw film stock, including color: 

56 U. S. Companies Reporting: $1,253,510 was 
the actual cash figure reported by these concerns: 



an additional report of approximately $100,000 
in raw stock purchases brought this total up to 
$1,353,510. 

ProjE(.imiin: ih,. ahuvr figures do riul Uiki- iiilo 
account oulsidc print purchases of films origin- 
ated by llir 126 reporting companies or volumi- 
of regular commercial laboratories doing busi- 
ness film work. $3,600,000 would be a low es- 
timate of 1952 raw stock purchases for direct 
film purchases and is further verified by con- 
stantly increasing print orders due to the large 
audience potential now realized for 16mm films. 



8. Does your company sell projection equip- 
ment ( 16iuni. slidefilm. etc. ) ? 

63 V. S. Companies Reporting: 36 of these 
companies said "yes" they do represent and sell 
various lines of projection equipment to their 
film clients. 27 other producing companies said 
they did not sell projection equipment. 
Projection: it is a general practice of these 
producing companies to represent or recom- 
mend projection equipment they believe best 
suited to their clients' needs. The majority of 
the 63 companies not reporting on this item 
would follow the same "'yes'" ratio on equipment 
representation. 



9. Do you provide film distribution? 
62 r. S. Companies Reporting: only 14 of the 
62 companies answering this question do provide 
non-theatrical distribution: the large majority 
(48 companies! do not distribute films on be- 
half of their clients. 



10. Dollar voliune of television production 
sales during 1952: 

14 V. S. CoMP.ANiEs Reporting: television pro- 
duction sales again reflect the most active TV 
showing areas such as New York, Chicago, De- 
troit. Los Angeles, etc. 44 producers reported 
S3. 046.254 in television film sales during 1952. 



Vlan\ producers have rejected television com- 
mercial production, however, because of the 
liighK-ciimpetitive pricing and lack of quality re- 
sulting. As network potentials improve, a de- 
I idcd trend toward these more experienced com- 
panies is being noted. As TV commercial buy- 
ers strive to meet higher talent costs, the in- 
genuity and experience of these established film 
companies may be an important factor in 19.53 
television film production. 



11. Total nundier of motion picture subjects 
and |)rints produced in 1952: 

52 I'. S. Companies Reporting: these 52 com- 
panies reported a total of 1266 individual sound 
motion pictures produced in 1952: of these 460 
were in color. 55.000 16mm sound prints were 
required: 11.348 35mm prints were made by 
only 51 companies reporting on this important 
item. There were 4.008 TV subjects produced, 
mostly short commercials. 
Projection: well over 1,500 motion picture 
subjects were produeed by the 126 key com- 
panies covered by this survey and about 75.000 
prints was their minimum requirement. 



12. Total number of slidefilnis and prints pro- 
duced in 1952 : 

51 U. S. Companies Reporting: they accounted 
for 287 slidefilnis. of which 227 were of the 
sound slidefilm type. These required the phenom- 
enal number of 425.953 prints and accompany- 
ing recordings. An additional number of 1.000 
slides were reported made. 

Projection: obviously only a small portion of 
the total sound slidefilm output is included 
above: this simple and effective form of audio- 
visualization is so widely produced that the 
above comparison simply illustrates the large 
number of prints and pressings resulting from 
the modest figure tabulated out of only 51 com- 
pany reports. B' 




Business Film ProductioH in 1952 

Number of Companies: 162 U.S. concerns are listed. 
126 of these furnished minimum reference data: 36 
were "incompletes." 

Sales Volume in 1952 : nearly $39,000,000 was reported 
by just 63 companies reporting: projection shows an 
increase of $6,000,000 over 1951 sales. TV "commer- 
cial' sales held even, despite talent strike in late '52. 

Types of Production: most concerns listed both motion 
picture and slidefilm production: several specialized in 
slidefilm production exclusively. 

New Companies and "Failures": stabilitv of the indus- 
try was indicated by listings from only two new firms 
in '52 although several firms specializing in television 
production also made application. There was just one 
reported business failure during the year. 

Buying Power: 44 companies reported over S6.000.000 
in material purchases plus Sl.253.000 in film purchases 
reported by 56 out of 126 "key"' companies. 



Left: Filiiii 



Ami ihe Earth Shall Give Back Ufe." 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 







gJ^fc^ 



THE Year's ""Best"" IO.mm Films for busi- 
ness and educational purposes are now an- 
nually selected in various special fields of 
interest, including the international screenings 
made at Edinburgh. Milan, and Venice: the na- 
tional awards in the special interest fields of the 
Freedoms Foundation and of the National Com- 
mittee on Fibns for Safety: and the community 
film festival audience selections made at Boston 
and Cleveland. Joining the awards parade in 
1952 were such organizations as the National 
Visual Presentation Association and the National 
Wildlife Federation. Similar mentions are made 
bv Scholastic, a school publication, and b\ 
FiNA.NClAL World, which selects annual report 
films. The Public Ltility .Advertising Associa- 
tion mentions films of merit in that field. 

The findings of all these groups are reflected 
in these .Award Pages of the Production Review 
issue and are supplemented this year by nomina- 
tions from our own nationwide editorial service 
bureaus and by members of a blue-ribbon jury 
composed of individuals who see a great manv 
such films. In addition to our own staff mem- 
bers, we called upon Robert Oaks of the Na- 
tional Association of Manufacturers: Cecile 
Starr. 16mm Film Editor of the Satirday Re- 
view OF Literati re. a discerning reviewer: Bob 
Finehaut of .Association Films: Richard M. 
Hough of Modern Talking Picture Service, Inc.: 
Ralph Creer of the American Medical Associa- 
tion (whose report appears on page 106 of this 
issue) and others of like repute. 

TTie "concensus films" which were selected by 
jt least two or more award juries included such 
nne pictures as Day in Court i National Com- 
.nittee on Films for Safety and Boston Film 
Festival awards i: Tlif Mark of C I Freedoms 

Award Wi.n.ner al Freedoms foundation and 
Cleveland ivas this Anheuser-Busch picture. 



Pictures of the Year 




1952 FREP:D()MS FOINDATION 
MOTION PICTIRE AWARDS 
IPRE.SENTED FEBRl .\RY 22. 1933 i 

Top x\vvard 

Lutheran Church-Missouri Svnod 

Title: All That I Have' 

Honor Medal Awards 

American Economic Foundation 

Title: Backfire 
Producer: Princeton Film Center 

Anheuser-Busch, Incorporated 

Title: The Mark of C 

Producer: Wilding Picture Prciduclicins 

The Bituminous Coal Institute 
Title: Powering America's Progress 

Chevrolet Division. General Motors Corp. 

Title: American Harvest 
Producer: The lam Handv Organization 

Encyclopaedia Britannica Films. Inc. 
Title: Pressure Groups 

Immigration and Naturalization Service 

U.S. Department of Justice 

Title: Twentieth Century Pilgrim 

Investment Bankers' Association 

Title: Opportunity, U.S.A. 

Producer: Wilding Picture Productions 

Oil Indu.stry Information Committee 
Title: Crossroads U.S.A. 
Producer: Screen Gems 

J. C. Penney Company, Incorporated 

Title: Story of a Mainstreet .Merchant 

l'n>ducer: John Sutherland Productions 

RKO-Pathe, Incorporated 
Title: Srveet Land of Liberty 

Sears Roebuck Foundation 

Title: The Fifth "H" 

Producer: The Venard Organization 

United States Steel Corporation 

Title: Let's Face It 

I'rodiirer: Wilding Picture Production^ 

.iiid -i\ olliir noteworthv filiii>. 



'Undat on and ClevJaiid Film Fc^tvall: Back- 
fire I Freedoms and Cleveland I : ,4 Closed Book 
i NCFS and Cleveland I : Powering America's 
Progress I Boston and Freedoms) : United 65.34 
I Boston and Edinburgh i : This Is Life (Venice 
and Edinburgh I: Pipeline to the Clouds (Edin- 
burgh and Milan I : and Big Idea ( Freedoms and 
Cleveland I . Sponsors and producers of these 
films are identified on succeeding pages. 

Members of Business Screen staff juries and 
authorities in the field nominated such fine pic- 
tures as The Story of a Main Street Merchant, 
produced by John Sutherland for the J. C. Pen- 
ney Company: And a I oice Shall Be Heard by 
the March of Time for the General Electric 
Compan> : Fallen Eagle, one of a series bv Alan 
Shilin for P. Lorillard i Old Golds I : Crossroads. 
L .S.A.. out of Screen Gems for the Oil Industrv 
Information Committee of the .American Petro- 
leum Institute: Food as Children See It. a Gen- 
eral Mills' production: Shining Heart, produced 
by Mode Art Pictures for Alleghenv Ludlum: 
Man Alive, the American Canctr Societ\ film. 

The Business Screen "outstanding film of the 
year"" citations (see next page) are shared bv 
such films as the Jesuit's The Greater Glory: Out 
of the i\orth. one of the great outdoor films of 
all time which has just been released by Nash 
Motors: Freedom and Power. General Electric's 
inspiring treatise: 24 Hours of Progress, another 
Oil Industry Information picture: Buckshot Goes 
to the Fair, which adds to the Texas Company's 
laurels in the rural audience field: Take It Easy. 
Bill, General Baking Company's emplovee rela- 
tions film, and The .Salesman, which brings a 
fresh light breeze of humor to the overly-serious 
business of sales conventions. JK" 

(CONTINUED ON THE KOLLOWING PACE) 

Honor Medal Win.ner of the Freedoms Founda- 
tion was this Chevrolet Technicolor film. 




19 5 3 P R O D b C T I O .\ K E \ I E «' 



53 





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mBr*fM 


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"/or (7,1 inspirational value 
and advancetnent oj religious life" 

to the 

Society of Jesus. New Yurk Pro\iiRe 

and to the producer 

Caravel Films. Incorporated 

Credits: Technical Assistance: Rev. John 
G. Furniss, S. J.; Narration: Rev. Robert 
I. Gannon. S.J.: Music: Rev. Wni. K. 
Trivett. S.J.: Direction: Mauri Goldberg. 
Jack Hively: Photography: Harold Muller. 
J. Burgi Contner: Script: Sherman Beck. 




"for clarity oj industrial exposition' 

to the 

Oil Industry Information Committee 

American Petroleum Institute 

and to the producer 
Louis de Rocheniont Associates 

"jor continuing and appreciative understanding 

of life in Rural America" — the films of 

The Texas Company 

produced in cooperation with 

Audio Productions. Inc. 



*^ BOSS TO 
|0|TBSFm 

■i 




Business Screen Nominates 
Iliese Outstanding Films 

FOR TIIFIR SPECIAI, MKKI'l 
IN \nv ANCING THIS MKDHM 

11115 jJDQ/^l 



"for delineation oj ideas and ideals 

to the General Electric Company 

and to the producer 

Raphael G. Wolff Studios 

Credits: Story: MacDonald MacPherson: 
Direction: Albert Kelley and O. Gail Papi- 
neau: Editing: David Lurie; Animation 
and Anistration: James Moore: Music: 
Hoyt S. Curtin. 



OUT OF THE NORTH" 




")nr the quality and excellent treatment 

oj natural history and sports lore 

to Nash Motors 

and to the producer 

MPO Productions 

Story: Roderick L. Haig-Brown: Direc- 
tion: Larry Madison: Photographs : Larry 
Madison and Robert Downey. 






"jor public education in the 

privilege oj active citizenship" 

to the Christophers 

and to Father James Keller 

and to the producer 

Screen Gems. Inc. 

(recipient of television film award made by the 
Freedoms Foundation in 1953) 




"jor betterment oj employee relations ' 

to the 

General Baking Company 

and to the producer 

Transfilm. Inc. 

"jor the original touch oj humor it brings 

to the wordiness oj conventions" 
produced with the cooperation oj FORTUNE 

1.) Alfred Butterfield and Thomas H. Wolf 
of Information Productions. Inc. 




54 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 




2nd Annual Boston Film Festival 

■+f Boston's Second .\jinual Film Festival, on 
May 3, 1952. honored such sponsored films as 
Day In Court (Harvester) ; Powering America's 
Progress (Bituminous Coal Institute) ; Gunninti 
the Flyways (Remington Arms) ; and Vniteil 
6534 (United Airlines). In other groups. High 
Wall (Anti-Defamation League): received a top 
award as did PeopU Alon^ the Mississippi ( Eli 
Films) and Life Along the Waterways (EBF). 




13th Annual Exhibition: N enice 

M The 13th International Exhibition of Cinema- 
tographic Art at Venice, Italy included This Is 
Life (American Meat Institute): United 6534 
(^Lnited Air Lines) : The Happy Locomotive 
(Baltimore & Ohio RR film by I nifilms. Inc.l : 
Service Unseen i Carrier I : and River Of \o Re- 
turn I produced by Raphael G. Wolff I . 



Cited for Contribution to Regional History 
Sponsor: The Southern Pacific Railway. Pro- 
duced by: Robert Yarnall Richie Productions. 




16mm Motion Pictures 
Receiving Honors in 1952 

A REVIEW OF AWARDS PRESENTED 
AT SIX RECOGNIZED CEREMONIES 



DAXIN 

Jar 



l^lgjj^l 



'Cofyrighl mi tt UmtutinJFtiiSniBttT Omf*wj 



National Films for Safety Awards 

-K The best safety films of 1951 as selected by 
the National Committee on Films for Safety in- 
cluded: Day In Court (Hariester) ; Tony Learns 
About Fire (Nat'l Board of Fire LTnderwriters) : 
Pipeline on Wheels (E. I. duPont de Nemours) : 
Story oj Pierre & Marie ( Quebec Pulp & Paper 1 : 
Motor Mania (Walt Disney) : and the slidefihn 
Pattern for Tragedy { Zurich-American I . These 
awards were announced in March 1952. 




6th ititl Edinhurfih Film Festival 

* The Sixth International Film Festival, held 
aimually at Edinburgh, Scotland, gave Certifi- 
cates to these sponsored films: Pipeline to the 
(Clouds (General Electric) and This Is Life 
(.American Meat Institute) both produced by 
Raphael G. Wolff: Thnt the Deaf May Speak 
I Lexington School production by Campus I : Fal- 
len Eagle (P. Lorillard film by Alan Shilin) : 
United 6531 (I'nited .-Mr Lines film by Cate & 
McGlonel: and 24 Hours of Progress i Petro- 
leum film In Louis dc Rochcnii>nt Associates. 




.Tth Annual Cleveland Film Festival 

•^ Cleveland's Fifth Annual Festival gave "Os- 
cars" to The Mark of C (Anheuser-Busch) : The 
Inner Man Steps Out (General Electric); A 
Closed Book (Farm Bureau Ins. Cos.) : Arizona 
-Land of Color and Contrast ( Standard Oil 
Co. of Calif. I : Backfire ( Amer. Economic Foun- 
dation I ; The Dirty Look (Gulf Oil I : and Wak- 
ing Point (British Inf. Services). Drug Addic- 
tion (EB Films) received award in education. 



DV POiTI B'lOM 



:./-iLii:-h\i'j.uLtii: 









1952 Freedoms Foundation Awards 

■K 1952 Freedoms Foundation .\wards (for 1951 
films) went to Big Idea (Swift & Co.); The 
duPont Story ( E. I. du Pont): Portrait oj a 
City ( Ford ) : And a Uoice Shall Be Heard (Gen- 
eral Electric i : Derision ( Ohio Oil ) : Man on the 
Land ( .Amer. Petro. Inst. ) : and Credit. Man's 
Confidence (Dun & Bradslreetl. 

National Visual Presentation 1st Award 

(iiven to Rov Rogers Enterprises for the film 
produced by Gate & McGlone. Hollywood. 




I<).i3 PRODI (T ION REVIEW 



55 



ALPHABETICAL INDEX TO PRODUCER LISTINGS 



UNITED STATES 



I'l-odiucr* 


Pajic iNo. 


\caduin l'ri)Hurlii)ns K^alif. i° 


H.S 


Aflilialed Film Producers 


S'> 


Alley. Paul Produclidiis 


S') 


All-Scope Pictures. Inc. 


K.5 


American Film Produccr.« 


S<) 


Apex Film Corporation* 


85 


Atlas Film Corporation . 


1 i 




85 


Audio Productions. Inc. 


59 


Barbre. Tlios. J. Motion I'icture Pr 


iductions 82 


Bay State Film Production,*. Inc. 


58 




72 


Berlet. Anderson. Marlin. Inc. 




Bransby. John Productions* 


50 


Bray Studios, Inc. 


-,<} 


Byron. Inc. 


72 



Cal-Pictures* iU 

Calyin Company Ml 

Campus Film Productions 60 

Caravel Films. Inc. 60 

Cale & McGlone. 85 

Centron Corporation. Inc. 80 

Chicago Film Studios 77 

Cinecraft Productions, Inc. ..-. 74 

Cinegraphics. Inc.* (TV) 60 

Coleman Productions 60 

Commerce Pictures 72 

Condor Films. Inc 81 

Culhane. Shamus Productions. Inc.* (TV). .. 60 

DeFrenes Company 70 

Dekko Film Productions. Inc 58 

Delano. Leonard Studios* 90 

Dephoure Studios 58 

Depicto Films. Inc 60 

Doivling. Pat Pictures. 85 

DuBois. Gene M. F. Motion Pictures* 82 

Dudley Pictures Corporation . 86 

Doane Productions 77 

Dynamic Films. Inc 60 



Empire Photosound. Inc 

Escar Motion Picture Service. Ir 



Fairbanks. Jerry Productions 86 

Farrell & Gage Films. Inc. 61 

Film Arts Corporation 82 

Film Creations. Inc.* (New) . 61 

Filmfa.x Productions 61 

Films for Industry* 61 

Florez. Incorporated 75 

Foley. George F.. Inc. 61 

Fordel Films 61 

Folovox. Inc. 72 

Fox, George Organization 86 

Francisco Films 77 

Galbreath Picture Productions, Inc 74 

Ganz. William J. Company 61 

General Pictures Productions. Inc 80 



Graphic Films Corporation 86 

Gulf Coast Films, Inc 82 

(Jutcrmuth. Clarence H.* 74 



llafela. Courtney Productions 
llaig & Patterson, Inc. 
Ilalligan. George" 
Hartle) Productions* 
Henning JJ, Cheadle. Inc. . 



Hpsselbein. John D. Studios* 70 

Hoefler. Paul Productions 86 

Imps. Inc. 62 

Information Productions. Inc 62 

Jam Handy Organization. The 76 

Jamieson Film Company 82 

Johnston. Bert Productions, Inc 74 

Jones. Dallas Productions. Inc 78 



Kayfetz. Victor Productions, Inc. 

Kcrkow. Herbert Inc. 

Kling Studios. Inc 

Knickerbocker Productions, Inc 

Kraft. Vernon J. Film Productions* 



* IriHicate.'^ 



nplete listing data 



Lane. Kent. Inc 72 

LaRue. Mervin W. Inc 78 

Loucks & Norling Studios, Inc 63 

Louis de Rochemont Associates 63 

Lux-Brill Productions, Inc 63 

Marathon TV Newsreel, Inc 63 

March of Time. The* 63 

Master Motion Picture Company 58 

McAIpin Productions* 86 

McLarty Picture Productions 68 

Mercury International Pictures, Inc 88 

Midwest Film Studios* 78 

Mode-Art Pictures. Inc 70 

Motion Picture Productions, Inc 75 

Motion Picture Service Company 84 

Movicon Motion Pictures 76 

MPO Productions. Inc . 63 

Murphy. Owen Productions, Inc. 63 

National Film Productions* 74 

Neal. Stanley Productions, Inc 64 

Nemeth. Ted Studios*. 64 

Newman-Schmidt Studios* 70 

News Reel Laboratory 70 

.New World Productions 88 

Northwest Motion Pictures 90 

On Film. Inc 68 

Orleans. Sam & Associates, Inc 72 

Palmer. W. A. Films. Inc 84 

Paragon Pictures, Inc 78 

Parrot Films Studio 80 

Pathescope Company of America. Inc. .. 64 

Photo & Sound Productions 84 

Photo-Art Commercial Studios 90 

Pilot Productions. Inc 78 

Polaris Pictures, Inc 88 

Premier-Hardcastle Productions 81 

* Indicates incomplete listinp data. 



Princeton Film Center, Inc 68 

Productions on Film, Inc.* (New) 75 

Promotional Films Co., Inc.* 64 

Rarig Motion Picture Co 90 

Ray. Reid H. Film Industries, Inc 81 

Reed. Roland Productions, Inc 88 

Richie. Robert ^arnall Productions, Inc 64 

Rippc). Arthur G. & Company 84 

Rivers. Walter A. & Associates 85 

R.K.O. Pathe. Inc 64 

Rocket Pictures, Inc 88 

Rockett. Frederick K. Company 88 

Rolab Studios 58 

Roquemore Films* 70 

Ross Roy, Inc. 76 

Roush. Leslie Productions. Inc 64 

Sarra, Inc 79 

Science Pictures, Inc 65 

Shilin. Alan Productions, Inc 65 

Smith, Fletcher .Studios, Inc.* 65 

.Smitley. Norris* . 74 

Sonochrome Pictures 84 

Sound Masters. Inc. 65 

Strauss. Henry & Co.. Inc 65 

.Sturgis-Grant Productions, Inc 65 

Sutherland. John Productions. Inc 89 

Telefibn, Incorporated 89 

Telenews Productions, Inc.* (TV) 65 

Telepix Corporation 89 

Tele-Visual Productions* 80 

Texas Industrial Film Company 82 

Thoma. Paul R.* 65 

Tonilin Film Productions 66 

TradeWays. Inc 66 

Training Films, Inc 66 

Transfilm. Inc 66 



Inifilms. Inc. 



66 



Van Praag Productions 66 

Venard Organization. The* 80 

Video Pictures. Inc 68 

Viking Pictures Corporation 79 

Vogue-Wright Studios 79 

Wade. Roger Productions 68 

Walker. Gene K. Productions 85 

Wilding Picture Productions, Inc 79 

Willard Pictures. Inc 68 

Wolff. Raphael G. .Studios 89 

Worcester Film Corporation* 59 



\orke, Emerson .Studi 



68 



CANADA 

.Ashley & Crippen. Ltd.* 
.Associated Screen News Ltd. 
Capitol Film Productions 
Crawley Films. Limited 

Omega Productions. Inc 

Parry. Lew Film Productions 91 

Peterson Productions 91 

Vega Films 91 



90 
90 
90 
91 
91 



TriHicarcs inrompletp listinp (lata. 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



\ A GEOGRAPHICAL INDEX \ 
\ TO PRODUCER LISTINGS i 



New England Region 

Connecticut. Massachusetts Va^e 58 

Vermont - Page 59 

Metropolitan New York Area 
Listings on Pages 59. 60. 61. 62. 63. 61. 66, 68 

Middle Atlantic Region 

New York State. New Jersey Pag^ 68 

Pennsylvania Page 'lO 

Washington. D. C Page 72 

Southeastern Region 

Georgia. Kentucky. Louisiana. Tennessee Page ~2 

East Central Region 

Indiana. Ohio Page 74 

Michigan Pages 75, 76 

Metropolitan Chicago Area 

Listings on Pages 77, 78. 79, 80 

West Central Region 

Illinois. Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota Page 80 

Minnesota, Missouri Pages 66. 67 

Wisconsin Page 82 

Southwestern Region 
Texas Page 82 

Mountain States Region 

Colorado ' Pages 82. 84 

West Coast Region 
Northern California Pages 84. 85 

Metropolitan Los .\ngeles Area 

Listings on Pages 85. 86. 88. 89 

Pacific Northwest Region 

Oregon. Washington Page 911 

Canadian Film Proiliioers Pages 90. 91 



1 'I ,-, S P R O D I' C T I O N R K \ 1 K W 




Business 
Screen 
National 
Survey 
of Film 
Production 
Resources 
in the U. S. 
and Canada 



Keys to Effective 
Use of Your 1953 
Buyer's Guide* 

LISTIiNG STANDARDS DEFINED 

THE following 2" |>age$ contain studio 
and personnel reference data on 162 
U. S. business and television film 
companies. Of this number, 126 prodiu-ers 
have fulfilled our minimum requirement 
for the listing of "recent productions 
and sponsors" as evidence of their 1952 
activity and ability. In addition eight 
companies in Canada are listed for the 
benefit of readers there. 

The value of this carefully prepared 
buyer's guide is evident in the New York 
telephone director)" listings of 357 firms 
in that single area: Chicago's directory 
lists 86; Los Angeles tallies 313. Add 
to these 756 "sources" other hundreds in 
similar directories. Caveat Emptor! 

TeleWsion film production has brought 
a vast number of "prospectors" into this 
field. The slap-dash nature of many TV 
commercials makes them poor material as 
character or quality references and they 
are not included as such. The ability 
to produce and sell longer packaged T\ 
programs is fair evidence of professional 
capacity and it is worth noting that credits 
of truly experienced business film companies 
are appearing with regularity on both 
sustaining and sponsored television programs. 

Read these producer listings carefully 
and ask to see the films offered in reference 
before you sign; the true capacity of any 
creative and technical service can only Ije 
measured by ichat has been done. 

Judge by this simple formula: e.xperience: 
satisfied clientele: stability and staff! 



r/Y^ 




U^ 4^ □ Ut 4f d 2B- 



IVKW EIVGLAND 



Connecticut 

RoLAB Studios 
and RoLAB Photo-Science Laboratories 

Sandy Hook. Connecticut 
Phone: Newtown 581 
Date of Organization: 1928 
Henry Roger, Ouner-Director 
Services: Motion pictures and slidefilms: indus- 
trial, educational, cultural, civic relations, TV 
features and commercials, 16 & 35 mm. Spe- 
cialty: technical & scientific photography. 
Facilities: Large sound stage, 16mm and 35mm 
cameras, zoom and follow track, camera truck, 
portable generator; complete lighting equip- 
ment; 16mm sync recorder, magnetic tape re- 
corder, disc recording system; microscopic 
laboratory and close-up studio; Shadowgraph, 
Inspectoscope; Interlock film projection system; 
color printing; library. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS .\ND SPONSORS 
.Motion Pictures: Baking Process as seen un- 
der the microscope (Kraft Foods Co.) ; Micro- 
scopy on Gastric Mucosa (Cornell Universit} ) ; 
The Power House (United lUuminatLng Co.) : 9 
subjects on Hon to Use th-e Plane I Stanley 
Tools I : partial production on several films 
I Connecticut Light & Power Co. I . 

Massachusetts 



Bay St.4te Film Productions. Inc. 
Box 129 
Springfield, Massachusetts 
Phone: 4-3164 
Date of Organization: 1944 
Branch: 80 Bovlston Street, Boston, Mass. 
Phone': Hancock 6-8904. 
OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 
Morton H. Read, President 
Eugene N. Bunting, V.P. (Prod.) 
David Dovle. I .P. (Sales) 
Mihon L. Lev7, V.P. (TV) 
Harold O. Stanton, V.P. (Dist.) 
Services: Documentary, sales training, public 
relations and television motion pictures and 
slidefilms: dramatic dialogue presentations, ani- 
mation. 

Facilities: Camera and lighting; sound stage; 
portable generator: Maurer 16mm recording; 
synchronous magnetic recording; Depue print- 
ing equipment: 16mm black and white develop- 
ing: 18 technicians: art and creative staffs. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS .\ND SPONSORS 
Motion Pictures: Tomorrow's Abrasive Tools 
Today (Bay State Abrasive Products Co.) ; 
Molded Rubber (Acushnet Process Co.); De- 
sign in Your Life I Rhode Island School of De- 
sign) : Sprinkler Control (Factory Mutual In- 
surance Co.) : The Third Week in September 
I Eastern States Exposition); The Modern Way 
(National Supply Co.) : Roosa-Master (The Hart- 
ford Machine & Screw Co.) ; Hold Everything 
(Allen Manufacturing Co.) 



Dekko Film Productions, Inc. 

126 Dartmouth Street 

Boston. Massachusetts 

Phone: KEnmore 6-2511 

Date of Organization: 1946 

Joseph Rothberg, President and Treasurer 

Jerry T. Ballantine, Vice President 

William Weisberg, Secretary 
Gwen Greenwood. Office Manager 

Services: Complete 16mm production services 
for education, science, industry and television. 

Facilities: Maurer 16mm camera and recording 
unit, magnetic recording, portable generator, 
sound studio, editing and projection rooms, 
creative staff. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Motion Pictures: Federal Reserve Bank of Bos- 
ton I Federal Reserve Bank ) : Providence College 
I Providence College) . 

Television Series: Wonders of the Wild (Bor- 
den Productions): Gadabout Caddis (Beacon 
Television Features) ; Stars in Your Eyes (Law- 
rence Laskey Productions I : Turn ui a Card 
I Laskev-\^'alker Productions i . 



Dephoure Studios 

782 Commonwealth Avenue 

Boston 15. Massachusetts 

Phone: BEacon 2-5722 

Date of Organization: 1935 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

Joseph Dephoure. Owner 

Edward GiLman Paul Coughlin 

Estelle D. Davis 

Services: Industrial and public relations motion 

pictures and slidefilms; television program films 

and commercials. 

Facilities: Drive-in sound stage and produc- 
tion equipment: automatic film processing; syn- 
chronous magnetic recording and sound film 
recording: projection and editing rooms; Koda- 
chrome printing: art work, animation, script 
writing. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Why Wait for a MUUon 
f Sloan Foundation) ; Boys Town of .Massa- 
chusetts (Boys Town of Massachusetts): Gran- 
ite Quarry Operations (H. E. Fletcher Co.) ; 
.American Investment Abroad (Sloan Founda- 
tion) : Meet Chris Herter (Massachusetts Repub- 
lican Committee I : Gannett Televiews (Narra- 
gansett Brewing Co.) 

Television Commercials: for Cott Beverages, 
.National Shawmot Bank. Soapine. Father 
Johns Medicine. 

M.ASTER Motion Picture Company 

50 Piedmont Street 

Boston 16. Massachusetts 

Phone: HAncock 6-3592 

Date of Organization: 1925 

OFnCERS AND DEPART.MENT HEADS 

Maurice Master. President and Treasurer 

S. Grace Master, Secretary 

Ir>ing Ross, General Manager 

John Gostanian. Lab Supt.: Harris Cohen, Prod. 



BUSINESS SCREEN .MAGAZINE 



Master Motion Pictiirrs: continued 
Services: Industrial and civic relations motion 
pictures and slidefilms; theatre trailers; tele- 
vision commercials: and film processing. 
Facilities: 16mm and 35mm sound recording 
studio; 16mm and 35mm processing laboratory; 
typesetters and artists for title-making; anima- 
tion stands, editing and projection rooms. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: A Single Voice (Combined 
Jewish .Appeal I : .\alional Teen- Age Road-E-0 
lU. S. Junior Chamber of Commerce and Lib- 
erty Mutual Insurance Co. I ; Keep 'Em Smiting 
(United Community Service I: Draper (Draper 
Corp.) Training film series for Wentworth 
Manufacturing Co. 

Worcester Film Corporation 

131 Central Street 

Worcester 8, Massachusetts 

Weld Morgan, President 

(Reference details on recent productions & 

sponsors not submitted.) 



Vermont 

-K -K ■»! 

COIRTNEY HaFELA PRODUCTIONS 

.\ndover, Vermont 

Phone: CHester 2020-2024 

Date of Organization: 1938 

BR.4NCH: New York Sales office. 550 Fifth Ave., 

N. Y. 36. Phone: PLaza 7-6454. 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 
Courtney Hafela, Producer-Cameraman 
Blandine Beaulieu. Associate Producer 
Emily Miles, Music Director 
Leonard .\bbott. Production Maintenance 
Services: Synch, sound motion pictures: tele- 
vision films: accurate color production for in- 
dustry, advertising, and merchandising. 
Facilities: 16mm and 35mm sound facilities. 
Major sound stages in Milltown, M. J. and Ver- 
mont. "Camera Caboose" mobile production unit 
will go anywhere. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
(All production under subcontract in 1952 J 



ll.4f C^U^Af 



^lETROPOLITAX IVEW YORK 



Affiliated Film Producers 
164 East 38th Street 
New York 16, N. Y. 
Phone: MLrray HiU 6-9279 
Date of Organization: 1946 
OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 
Willard Van Dyke, Secretary 
Irving Jacoby, Treasurer 
Kevin Smith, Production Manager 
Aram Boyajian, Editing Department Chief 
Services: Script to finished film. Specialties: 
documentary and educational films. 
Facilities: Production equipment; editing de- 
partment; directors and script writers. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

MoTlo.N Pictures: The Lonely Night (Mental 
Health Film Board) ; Broken Appointment 
(Commonwealth of Pennsylvania) ; To Freedom 
(U. S. Department of State) ; Mew York Uni- 
versity (New York University.) 



Paul Alley Productions 

619 West 54th Street 

New York, N. Y. 

Phone: JU 6-2393-4 
Date of Organization: 1949 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 
Paul Alley. President 
Frank Baker, Manager 
Services: Industrial. TV, Public Service. Fea- 
ture, and Documentary films: 16 & 35mm, color 
and black and white. 

Facilities: 16mm projector, equipped cutting 
rooms, moviola, professional tape recorder 7';) 
& 15. lights, lenses, viewer and general stand- 
ard equipment. 



RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Motion Pictures: Mr. Weber Discovers 
America ( Pfeiffer Brewing Co.^ ; Presidential 
Campaign, King Feisal Tour of U. S. (State De- 
partment) : Xmas Message for TV (Lever Broth- 
ers) : Xetc York State Thruway (N. Y. State). 



American Film Producers 

1600 Broadway 

New York 19, N. Y. 

Phone: PLaza 7-5915 

Date of Organization: 1946 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

Robert Gross, Executive Producer 

Lawrence A. Glesnes, Executive Producer 

Robert C. Jacques, Chief of Editorial 

Julian C. Townsend, Supervisor of Photography 

Sheldon Abromowitz, Production Control 

Madeline Stolz, Office Mgr. 

Services: Sponsored motion pictures and slide- 
films for theatres, television, education, training, 
sales. 

Facilities: Portable production equipment, 
16mm and 35mm with sound, stage for shooting 
small sets; special effects; animation; storyboard 
personnel, script writers. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Motion- Pictures: Private Ambrose (Grant Ad- 
vertising, Inc.): A Mind of Her Own (Array 
Recruiting) : The Crass Is Always Greener (Air 
Force Recruiting): Target Recruit (Robert W. 
Orr .Associates. Inc.) : ;l/en of the Forest (U. S. 
State Department ) : Radar Bombing and Rocket 
Firing (U. S. .\avy.) 

Television Commercials for: Servel. Palm 
Beach, Save-\-See. American Weekly, Army and 
Air Force Recruiting, Marcal, Lipton-Frostee 
and others. 



Audio Productions, Inc.. 

Film Center Building 

630 Ninth Avenue 

New York 36, N. Y. 

Phone: COlumbus 5-6771 

Date of Organization: 1933 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

Frank K. Speidell, President 

Herman Roessle, Vice President 

Lawrence W. Fox, Jr., Treasurer 

P. J. Mooney, Secretary 

Services: Motion pictures only, all commercial 
categories. Specialties: public relations, sales 
promotion, merchandising, training, medical, 
other technical and educational. 

Facilities: Camera and lighting equipment, 
four 16mm and 35mm cutting rooms; six film 
vaults; two optical printers; 16mm and 35mm 
projection room; machine shop; music director 
and several hundred thousand feet of original 
music on film ; seven staff writers and seven staff 
directors. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: In Our Part of the Country 
(American Gas & Electric Co.): Operator ToU 
Dialing, Do Unto Others (American Telephone 
& Telegraph Co.) ; Tomorrow Is Now (Atlantic 
City Electric Co.) : You're the Doctor, This is 
Ethyl (Ethyl Corp.); Therapy with Cortone, 
Vinethene in Anesthesia (Merck & Co.); Prog- 
ress on the Rails (Pennsylvania Railroad): 
Buckshot Goes to the Fair, Protect Your Invest- 
ment (The Texas Co.); Apprentice Training 
(U. S. Department of State) ; Jet Test (U. S. 
Air Force.) Fihns in series for McGraw-Hill 
Book Co., U. S. Navy. 

Television Commercials: for N. W. Ayer & 
Son, Inc., Benton & Bowles, Inc., Young & Rubi- 
cam, Inc., and others. 

John Br.\nsby Productions 

122 W. 55th Street 

New York 19, N. Y. 

Phone: J Udson 6-2600 

(Reference details on recent productions 
and sponsors not submitted) 



The Bray Studios, Inc. 
729 Seventh Avenue 
New York 19, N. Y. 
Phone: Circle 5-4582 
Date of Organization: 1914 
OFHCERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 
J. R. Bray, President 
M. Bray, Treasurer 
P. A. Bray. J ice President and Secretary 
B. D. Hess, Distribution Manager 
Services: Industrial sales and job training mo- 
tion pictures and slidefilms; training films for 
U. S. Armed Forces; theatrical; educational; 
animated cartoons and technical subjects; tele- 
vision films. Distributor to schools. 
Facilities: Studio equipment for all kinds of 
motion pictures and slidefilms, sound and color; 
animation department; production crews, artists, 
script writers: film library. (Cont'd) 



1953 PRODUCTION REVIEW 



IVEW YOICK CITY: 

The Bray Studios: continued 
RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Motion Pictukes: Flif^lu Test oj APG-3I 
I Sperry Gyrostope Co.): Your Sclienlcy Ad- 
verlisinfi (Schenlcy Distillers): Swaging (Fenn 
Manufacturing Co. I : Inslniclor Training ( U. S. 
.\avv): Cause for Alarm. Fatal Seconds ( Span- 
ish. l.C.O. i . 



C.\MPUs Film Productions 

161 Remsen Street 

Brooklyn 2, N. Y. 

Phone: TRian<;lo .S-6296-7-8 

Date of Organization: 1934 

OFFICERS .\ND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

Nat Campus, Executive Producer 

Services: Motion pictures and slidefihus for 
business, government and welfare agencies; also 
various film services separately, including trans- 
lations, sound tracks: finishing service for com- 
pany photographed films. 

F.tciUTIE.s: Complete studio, on-location equip- 
ment and creative staff. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Motion PictikE-s: A Thought jor Your Pennies 
(Greater New York Fund) : The Story oj an En- 
terprise I Bunge Corp. ) ; The High Cost of Care- 
lessness (Southern Railway System) : Your 
Coast Guard Reserve (U. S. Coast Guard) : 
ffhen Better Bricks Are Made fHanley Co.). 



Caravel Films. Inc. 
730 Fifth Avenue 
New York 19, N. Y. 
Phone: Circle 7-6110 
Date of Organization: 1929 
Studio: 132 Prospect Street, Hempstead, L. 1. 
Akron Representative: Ernest Nathan. 
336 Second National Building. Akron, Ohio 
OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 
David 1. Pincus. President and Treasurer 
F. Burnham MacLeary, V.P. 
Harold .M. .Manser, V.P. 
Ernest R. Nathan, V.P. 
Claire V. Barton. Secty. 
Mauri Goldberg, Mgr. Prod. 
Calhoun McKean. TV Mgr. 
David Kreeger. Studio Mgr. 
Jack Semple. Animation 
Lawrence Kreeger. Editing Mgr. 
Arnold Vogelsang. Slidefilm Mgr. 
Charles Moore. Manager, Still Photography 
Services: Sales, dealer and vocational training 
motion pictures; public and personnel relations, 
educational, religious films; television commer- 
cials; shdehlms, transparencies, stage presenta- 
tions, field surveys. 

Use Advertising Pages in This Issue 
* * * Bold-face stars appearing above listings 
in this section indicate advertisements of these 
|ir.. rln.fr- in other pages of this issue. 



Carnirl Films, Inc.: continued 
Facilities: Motion picture studio for sound, si- 
lent, color and black and white: still photo- 
graphic studio: animation department: projec- 
tion room: cutting and editing rooms. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Motion Pictures: The Miracle oj the Can 
I American Can Co.) : Mister Pipixijo.x (Colum- 
bia Broadcasting System) : The Greater Glory 
(Jesuit Seminary Building Fundi: Let's Sell 
iSocony Vacuum Oil Co.); Fijty Million Sales 
n Week (Snow Crop Marketers.) 

(!ine<;raphics. In*:. 

,T East 57tli Street 

New York. N. Y. 

Phone: PLaza 9-8532 

Studio: .5 East 57th Street, N. Y. 

Date of Organization: 1951 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

Francis C. Thayer. President 

Rene Bras. Production Supervisor 

Robert Collinson. Editor 

Services: TV shows. Commercials on Film. 
Ariimation. 

Facilities: Sound studio, animation stands 1 16 
i 35mm I. complete live-action equipment, cut- 
ting rooms, projection rooms, art department. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Television: Gaylord Hauser Show (Minute 
Maid) : Paul Killiam Shoiv (Syndicated) : Bron- 
zine. Limited ( Bronzine. Ltd.): 
Television Commercials: for Republican Na- 
tional Committee 1 150 spots) . Bulova Watch 
Co. ( station breaks ( . 

(No data available on other fields I 

Coleman Productions 

56 West 45tli Street 

New York 19, N. Y'. 

Phone: Murry Hill 7-9020 

Date of Organization: 1935 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

Harry L. Coleman. President 

Richard Roth. Director oj Photography 

.\rthur O'Connor. Editor 

Joseph Monaco, Sales Rep. 

Services: 16mm and 35mm motion pictures, 

color, black and white, for science, industry, and 

television. 

Facilities: Creative staff, 16mm and 35mm mo- 
tion picture cameras, recording equipment, edit- 
ing and projection facilities, lighting equipment. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Handmacher Suits the 
American Scene I Handmacher-Vogel ) : Micro- 
cast I Austenal Laboratories ) : Italian Hospital- 
ity iCiga Hotels of Italy.) 

Shamus Culhane Productions. Inc. 

207 East 37th Street 

New York 16, N. Y. 

Phone: MUrray Hill 2-8243 

Date of Organization: 1946 

(Sponsored Films Dept. 19,52 1 



ShaniNs Ciilhani' I'r-d. Inc.: continued 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

Shamus Culhane. Pres.. Exec. Producer 

George L. George. Producer-Director, 

In Charge oj Sponsored Films 

Maxine Marx. Exec. Director. TV Commercials 

Services: .Sponsored Films. TV Commercials. 

Animation. 

Facilities: Animation Studio, cutting rooms. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Television Commercials: for Muriel Cigars, 
Halo, Ajax. Campbell Soups, Borden Co., 
Chesterfield. Lill. Hinso. Lipton Tea, Mennen 
Co.. and others. 

i\.. data available c, nllp-r fields I 



Depicto Films. Inc. 
254 West 54th Street 
New York 19, N. Y. 
Phone: COlumbus 5-7621 
Date of Organization: 1942 
officers and DEPARTMENT HEADS 
John Hans, President 
Thomas J. Dunford, Executive Vice President 
W. S. Allen. I ice President and Secretary 
Services: Motion pictures, Slidefilms, Visualiza- 
tions. Animation, vugraphs. 

Facilities: Sound Studios; Art, Animation and 
Editing. Hotpress and Slide Departments. 

RECENT PRODI CTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Motion Pictures: Bright Future. See Your 
House in a .\eu Light (Lamp Division. General 
Electric I : Lije in Your Hands ( Flei.schman Di- 
vision. Standard Brands.) 

Sound Slidefilms: The Way to the SaJe 
(Singer Sewing Machine Co.) : The Case oj the 
Red Hot Dealer ( Kentile. Inc. ) 



Dynamic Films, Inc. 

112 \<'. 89th Street 

New York 24, N. Y. 

Phone: TRafalgar 3-6221 

Date of Organization: 1945 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

Henry Morley, President 

Nathan Zucker. V. P. and Treasurer 

Lee R. Bobker. Executive Producer 

Kit Davidson. Executive Producer 

Luke Bennett. Editorial Supervisor 

Al Weintraub. Radio Tran.uription Manager 

John De Blau. Sound Recording .Supervisor 

Margaret Pfeiffer. Gen. Manager and 

Personnel Director 

Services: 16 and 3Smm motion pictures from 
planning to distribution, foreign language ver- 
sions*. TV commercials and programs, sound re- 
cording, photographic coverage of special events. 
Facilities: 16 and 35mm cameras, lighting, edit- 
ing, equipment, sound stages, mobile location 
units, projection theater, sound recording, sync 
tape and disc transcriptions, art and animation 
department, music library, Dynamican multi- 
camera TV production. 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



Dynamic Films, Inc.: continued 
RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Mission Accomplished, .ilice 
in Adland. Am and Grasshopper. What Are You 
Doing Tonight':' I McGraw-Hill Publishing Co.) : 
.^ew York (American Airlines I: Leather is 
Fashion (leather Industries of America) : High 
Tower fWomen's League for Israel) : Pepper- 
bird Land ( Liberian Consulate); I'ick a Whin- 
ner (The Pure Oil Co. I : Cover Girl (Charles 
Antcll. Inc. I; Keep 'Em Rolling (Chicago Pneu- 
matic Tool Co. I; Fahuhu^s HOd (Perfect Circle 
Corp. I : Campaigning with Stevenson (Volun- 
teers for Stevenson ) : Let's Do It ( Socony- 
Vacuum Oil Co.): Racing Champions (Cham- 
pion Spark Plug Co. I : Fire on the Farm ( Na- 
tional Board of Fire IriderHriters) : The Con- 
gressional-Senator Run (The Pennsylvania Rail- 
road I: Wicked Willie Ifeevel (U.S. Industrial 
Chemicals. Inc. I : The Continental. Speed Clas- 
sics, Funny Bunnies. Christma,^ Carols, } our 
Beauty Clinic. Musical .Moments (TV Pro- 
grams. I 

TV Commercials: for Ofiice of Civil Defense. 
Bardahl Oil Co.. Bisodol, Life-Buoy. DiNobili 
Cigars. Charles Antell. Flexees. Ballade Perfume 
Co.. Fastabs. 



Farrell and Gage Films, Inc. 

213 East 38lh Street 

New York 16. N. Y. 

Phone: Mlrray Hill 3-8358 

Date of Organization: 1951 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

Matt Farrell. I'res.. in Charge oj Prod. 

Hugh F. Gage, Exec. V . P., in Charge oj Sales 

Joseph Faro, Film Editor 

William McAleer, Chief Cameraman 

Services: Production of motion pictures and 

slidefilms. 

Facilities: 16mm and 35mm moticm picture pro- 
duction, black and white and color, slidefilms. 
animation stand, scoring, sound and script de- 
partments, overseas and foreign language pro- 
duction. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Motion Pictures: Map of an Empire (United 
Gas Corp.): Pipeline Pioneer (Panhandle East- 
ern Pipe Line Co. I ; Minjak Tanah ( California 
Texas Oil Co.. Ltd. ) : Tool and Diemaking — 
Key.stoue of Mass Production! (National Tool 
and Die .Manufacturers .'Xssoc. I . 
SoiiND Slidefii.m: AS.4RC0 Continuous ('asling 
'American Smeltinf; and Rifiiiiiig Co. i . 



Film CIrf.ations. Im;. 

112 West 89tli Street 

New York 24. N. Y. 

Phono: SlI 7-6()2,S 

Date of Organization: 1952 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

Joseph M. Barnelt. President 

William H. (iroody, /./'.. .Secretary 

Edward Roberts Carroll. Treasurer, Prml. Dr. 

Services: Motion picture,*. TV commercials and 
TV programs, animation. 



Film Creations: coiiliiiiird 
Facilities: NC Mitchell. lOmm and still cam- 
eras, moviola, sychronous tape recording, studios. 

re<:ent PRODI ctions and SPON.SORS 
Motion Pictire: Passport In America (Willys- 
Overland. I 

TV Co.MMKRClALS for Sylvania Electric, Savarin 
Coflce. .American Oil Company, Auto-Lite, Mon- 
santo (Chemical, Ludens Coughdrops. 

( New company organized in 1952 I 



FiLMFAX FROnUCTIONS 

10 East 43rd Street 

New York 17. N. Y. 

Phone: MUrray Hill 7-8876 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

Henry Clay Gipson, President 

Eloise Walker, V.P. and Secretary 

Carol Cook. Script 

Muriel Convers, Research 

John Lencicki, Art Director 

John Obold, Production 

Services: Educational filmstrips and industrial 

sliilefilnis. ci>lor. black and white, silent, .sound. 

Facilities: Specialized equipment for filnistrip 
production, 35mm standard Bell & Howell ani- 
mation stand for filmstrips. special custom buill 
equipment for Kodachrome duplication. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Soi ND Slidefilms: Cradle oj an .American In- 
dustry (American Iron and Steel Institute! : -iO- 
Pageant oj America (Yale University I :ft-Cur- 
renl .'Ijjairs (.New York Times!: Discovery at 
Suugus I Hill \ Kno»lton! : 90 educational iilm- 
slrij.s. 



Films for Industry, Inc. 

135 W. S2nd Street 

New York 19, N. Y. 

Phone: PLaza 3-2800 



(;i,,;t(ji; F. Foi i-,v. Inc. 
625 Madison Avenue 
New York 22. N. Y. 
Phone: Plaza 1-1860 

OFFll'.ERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

George F. Foley. President 

John C. Holahan. I' ice President 

John Ward. Production Chief 

Joseph F. Kelly. Sales Manager 

Carl Dorese. Copy Chiej 

Servk Es: Motion pictures, slide films, pnsetila- 

tions. 

Facilities: include standard sets, cameras, sound 
rciuipnienl. sound studio, etc. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Motion Pictires: The Great Achievement (Oul- 
<loor Advertising Industry I : Preview of I95H 
iC. H. Masland & Sons I: Your Career in the 
Coast Guard: Your Lifetime ( Plymouth Cordage 
(!().!: The Story of a .Masterpiece (Director 
Products Corp.) . 



FoRDEL Films Division of Fordel 
Film Laboratories 

1187 Universitv .\ venue 

New York 52. N. Y. 

Phone LUdlow 8-5100 

Date of Organization: 1941 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

C. F. Potts. President, Executive Producer 

Waller G. Snowden. Spec. Asst. to Pres. 

Ill nry V,. (iranl. f .P. and Genera] Manager 

Enid Hessler. Secretary-Treasurer 

Gordon Hessler. Production .Manager 

W. Edward Downton, Account Executive 

James M. Logan. Director of Photography 

Reginald McMahon. Editing Unit Manager 

(Jtnnaro P. Forcnza, Color Specialist 

Robert J. Herman. Editor 

Orlando Seda. Sound Recordist 

C. Douglas Sawyer, M.D., F.A.C.S., 

Medical Advisor 

Emil A. Naclerio. .M.D.. F.C.C.P.. 

Medical Advisor 

Services: Medical, scientifie, educational, insti- 
tutional, promotional and television motion pic- 
tures; slide films. Specialists in 16mm color 
productions, planning to prints. Specialists in 
foreign language adaptations. 

Facilities: Studio, camera, animation, sound 
recording, editorial, and release printing equip- 
ment. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS 
Motion I'uti res: Raines Can Be Controlled: 
English. French and Spani.sh versions!. En- 
zyme Therapy with I aridase: English and Span- 
ish. Hog Cholera Control with Rovac: French. 
Modern Control of Poultry Disease ( Lederle 
Laboratories Division American Cvanamid Co. I 
.Aureomycin Packing and Dressing ( Davis & 
Ceck. I lie. I : Living Waters Series — Part 1 , A'o- 
ture's Plan, Part 2, .Man's Problem (Conserva- 
tion Foundation); Spanish and Portuguese. Ny- 
drazid ) E. R. Squibb & Sons.) 

Wiii.ivM J. tiw/. (Company 

40 East 49tli Street 

New York 17. N. Y. 

Phone: ELdorado 5-1443 

Date of Organization: 1919 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

William J. Ganz, President 

v.. J. Spiro. Production Manager 

Herbert R. Dietz. General Manager 

Jane Page. Comptroller 

SehvilEs: Producer and distributor of 16mm 
and 35mm motion pictures, filmstrips, sound 
slidefilms. visual presentations for education, 
aibiTlising and leli\ision. iCont'dl 



Film Lists .\re Your References 

* Complete listings furnished by production 
companies of recent films and their sponsors are 
your evidence of references for quality and char- 
acter of production services rendered. 



1 '» :. 3 P R O D U C T I ( I \ H I \ 1 i: W 



IVEW TOKK I ITY: 

William J. Canz: continued 
Facilities: Studio equipment: cameras; creative 
staff, development of story ideas and merchandis- 
ing campaigns. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Motion Pictires : It's Fun to Swim ; Red Cross 
Report I'J.'i^ (American Red Cross) : S.5. United 
States (State Dept.1. 

Sound Slidefii.MS: Authority for Action (BUSI- 
NESS week) ; Technique of I enipuncture (Amer- 
ican Red Cross). 

Gulf Coast Films, Inc., 9 W. 61st Street, New 
York 23, N. Y. Phone: Circle 6-0191. 
(See complete listing in Texas section) 



Courtney Hafela Productions 

550 Fifth Avenue 

New Y ork 36, N. Y. 

Phone: PLaza 7-6454 

(See complete listing in New England Area) 



The Jam Handy Organization 
The Jam H.^ndy Organization, Inc., 1775 
Broadway, New York 19, N.Y. Phone: JUdson 
2-4060. Herman Goelz, in charge. 
(Complete office facilities and projection room 
with service staff maintained in N. Y. For com- 
plete data see Detroit, Michigan listing) 



Hartley Productions. Inc. 

20 W. 47th Street 

New York 19, N. Y. 

Phone: JUdson 2-3960 

(Reference details on recent productions & 
sponsors not submitted.) 



Henmnc and Cheadle. Inc.. 15 East 60th 
Street, New York, N. Y. Phone TEmpleton 
8-8288. Charles Beh)Tner. manager. Complete 
photographic service for production and dis- 
tribution. 

(Complete listing under Detroit area) 



Imps. Inc. 

International Movie Producers' Service 

515 Madison Avenue 

New York 22, N. Y. 

Phone: El 5-6620 

Studios: Ben Gradus Studios, Ltd., 321 West 

56th Street, New York 19, N. Y. 

Date of Organization: 1948 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

Ben Gradus, President 

Victor M. Ratner, Partner 

Walter Sachs, Production Supervisor 

Ezra R. Baker, Director of Sales 

Harry Wolf, Studio Manager 

Julius Goldstein, Editorial Supervisor 



IMPS. Inc.: continued 
Services: Producers of motion pictures: public 
relations, industrial, commercial, educational, 
sales and personnel training. Short films for TV. 
commercials, minute movies, community sing 
films, unique purpose films. Slide-films: public 
relations, commercial, sales, etc. 

Facilities: Fully equipped studio including two 
sound stages, including recording, scenic design- 
ing, direction casting, iMPS-designed lighting 
equipment, miniatures, props, sets, music re- 
cording, dressing rooms, lounge. Complete loca- 
tion filming and recording equipment and per- 
sonnel. Interlock projection room, fully equip- 
ped cutting rooms, 35mm and 16mm. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Motion Pictures: Teatown — U.S.A. (Tea Bu- 
reau! ; Sjxin oj Life (Upjohn Co.) : Fluoroscopy 
(Picker X-Rav Corp.) : World in a Schoolroom 
(U.S. Aniivl : On This Day (Health Insurance). 



Information Productions. Inc. 

5 East 57th Street 

New York 22. N. Y. 

Phone: ELdorado 5-1722 

Date of Organization: 1951 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 
Alfred Butterfield. President 
Thomas H. Wolf. Vice President 
Robert R. Collinson, Editor-in-Chiej 
Robert W. Asman, Production Associate 
Services: Documentary, educational, sales, train- 
ing, public relations motion pictures, slide films, 
film scrips. TV commercials, animation, sound 
recording. 

Facilities: Fully equipped sound recording stu- 
dio: fully equipped animation stands. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Motion Pictures: On the Way (New York 
State Thruway Authority) : Kefauver Investi- 
gates Elsie (Borden Co.): The Salesman (For- 
tune) : Henry Lends a Hand (Committee for 
Political Infoniiation and Education) : Crusade 
for Freedom — 1952 (Crusade for Freedom) ; 
Old Time Aviation, Country Editor, Touring 
America, First Haircut, Helicopter Rescue, In- 
dustrial Photography. Training a Bus-Driver 
I Ford Foundation TV-Radio Workshop: "Omni- 
bus") : Douglas MacArthur (Rockledge Insti- 
tute! : Under .African Skies (Missionary Sisters 
of Our Lady of Africa) . 

Sound Slidefilms: Seeds of Knowledge, Test- 
ing Paper, Assembly of Vacuum Tube (U.N.). 
TV Commercials for Standard Oil (N.J.) Cru- 
sade for Freedom, CBS System Identification. 

Victor Kayfetz Productions, Inc. 

130 E. 56th Street 

New York 22, N.Y. 

Phone: MUrray Hill 8-1707 

Date of Organization: 1947 

Victor Kayfetz, President, Executive Producer 

Allan P. Snody, Client Liaison Dir. 

William L. Steinel, Art Director 

Verne Burnett. Sales Manager 

Abe Blashko. .inimation Dir. 

Henrv Freeman, Film Editor 



Victor Kayfetz I'rodiirlinns: continued 
Services: Motion pictures and slidefilms, spe- 
cializing in combining live cinematography and 
various types of animation. Almost all work in 
color. s|)ecial TV films. 

Facilities: Staff writers, 35mm Eclair Camer- 
ette and DeBrie Model L (Eclair and Cine 
.Special for 16mm). sound and editing equip- 
ment including stand for 15mm and 35mm, art 
department, story boards. 

RECENT productions AND SPONSORS 
.Motion Pictures: Group Replacement of Flu- 
orescent Lamps (Westinghouse Electric Corp.) : 
Sea Fever (Natl. Assn. of Engine & Boat Manu- 
facturers) : Holiday Afloat (Evinrude Motors) ; 
.Hive from the Deep (Marine Studios. Florida) ; 
Treasure oj the Bahamas, and Out of the Sea 
( Development Board of Nassau in the Bahamas) . 

Sound Slidefilms: Early Season Cotton Bandits 
and Late Season Cotton Bandits (Shell Chemical 
Corp.) 



Herbert Kerkow, Inc. 

480 Lexington Avenue 

New York 17, N. Y. 

Phone: Paza 1-1833 

Date of Organization: 1937 

officers and department heads 

Herbert Kerkow. President, Treasurer 
Rosemond Kerkow, Secretary 
Services: Production from original research to 
finished film. Specialties: Public relations films 
for general audiences, educational films for 
schools. 

Facilities: Sound stage, set building depart- 
ment, projection, sound recording and re-record- 
ing; editing; three cameras (Bell & Howell and 
Eclair Camerette, 35mm and Maurer 16mm). 

recent productions and sponsors 

Motion Pictures: VD — Taking Chances (U. S. 
Navy) ; Series of six Gregg Shorthand Teacher 
Training Dialogue films (McGraw-Hill Text 
Films) ; The H arning Shadoic (American Can- 
cer Society) : Effective Training with Synthetic 
Devices (U. S. Navy) ; Series of dialogue inter- 
view for Taft pre-convention campaign (Citizens 
for Taft-Kudner Agency I : TV program series 
pilot film I Empire Productions) . 

FiLMSTRlPS: Series of five films on Marriage 
and Family Living (McGraw-Hill Text Films). 

Television Commercials for: Telechron. Inc. 



Knickerbocker Productions, Inc. 

1600 Broadway 

New York 19, N.Y. 

Phone: Circle 6-9850 

Date of Organization: 1947 

officers and department heads 

Howard .\. Lesser, President 

Thomas S. Dignan. Vice President 

Mary Morrissey. Secty-Treas. 

Marion Scatena. .4sst. Secty. 

James Hanney, Production Manager 

Charles R. Senf, Edit. ChUf 
Kennedy W illianis. Sales Manager 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



Knickerbocker Productions: continued 
Services: Production from original research to 
finished fihn; specialties: documentary educa- 
tional and public relations motion pictures and 
slidefilms. 

Facilities: Production equipment, editing and 
slidefilm departments. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Motion Pictures: Search for Savings (Western 
Electric Co) : Good Diet in the Tropics (Ameri- 
can International Assn.); Decision at Williams- 
burg (Colonial Williamsburg. Inc.) : The Air 
Force arul Small Business (United States Air 
Force) : Veterinary Services (United States Air 
Force); Refueling the Aircrajl ( I nited States 
Navy) . 



Louis de Rochemont Associates 

35 West 45th Street 

New York 36. N. Y. 

Phone: LU 2-1440 

Louis de Rochemont, Executive Producer 

Thomas Orchard, Associate Producer 

Lothar Wolff, Associate Producer 
F. Borden Mace, Associate Producer 
Martin J. Maloney, Treas. & Gen. Mgr. 
Services: Industrial, educational and public re- 
lations motion pictures: films for U. S. Armed 
Forces and Governmental agencies; short sub- 
jects in color for theatres; tele\nsion films. Es- 
tablished facilities in U. S. and three foreign 
countries and representatives in most countries 
of the world. 

Facilities: Sound and color equipment for 
camera work on location; portable generator, 
R.C.A. sound channel on chassis and electric 
truck. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Motion Pictures: Ttventy-Four Hours of Prog- 
ress (American Petroleum Institute) ; . . . Arui 
the Earth Shall Give Back Life (E. R. Squibb & 
Sons) : Family of Craftsmen f Studebaker Corp.) ; 
Hoic Science Serves You (Technicolor for Lig- 
gett & Myers Tobacco Co.) ; Philippine Reha- 
bilitation (U. S. Dept. of State) ; Tale of Two 
Villages and The L nseen World f Government of 
the Lnion of Burma) : Martin Luther (Feature 
for Lutheran Church Productions) . 



LOUCKS AND rS'ORLING StLDIOS. InC. 

245 W. 55th Street 
New York 19, N. Y. 
Phone: COlumbus 5-6974 
Date of Organization: 1923 
OFFICERS AND DEPART.MENT HEADS 
J. A. Norling. President 
Wil Marcus, lice President 
Hans Tiesler, Associate Producer 
Services: Industrial, job and sales training, 
public relations, educational. Government mo- 
tion pictures and slidefilms. 
Facilities: Studio equipment for 16mm and 
SSnun productions; animation camera and art 
departments; three-dimensional still and motion 
pictures; creative staff including artists, photog- 
raphers, writers, film editors, directors. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Motion Pictures: Copper and Common Sense 



Loucks and .Vor/ing Studios: continued 
(Revere Copper and Brass, Inc.) ; Better Cam- 
eras & How They Are Made (Argus Cameras, 
Inc.); Specify Rome Cable (Rome Cable Cor- 
poration) : Television Training Series (McGraw- 
Hill Co. 1 : U. S. Navy and Air Force training 
films; U. S. Department of State. 



Lux-Brill Productions, Inc. 
348 Livingston Street 

Brooklyn 17, N. Y. 
Phone: ULster 8-5820 

Date of Organization: 1952 
OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

Ir\'ing Spector, President 

Richard S. Dubelman, Client Liaison 

Robert Braverman, Production Supervisor 

Services: Complete production of live and/or 
animated motion pictures and sUdefilms from 
idea stage to screen stage. Editing and re-edit- 
ing company films: distribution of sponsored 
films: integration of motion pictures and live 
tele\ision. 

Facilities: Complete animation department; 
fully equipped studio for live shooting; location 
equipment; editing and screening rooms; com- 
plete creative and technical staff. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Another Cup of Coffee fWest 
Bend .-Muminum Company) ; From Coffee-Grind- 
er to Big Twin (Evinrude Motors) : Once Upon 
a Time (Webster-Chicago Corporation I : The 
Dream Factory (Shulton. Inc. I : The Woman 
Steps Out I Arkade Fur Trading Corporation) : 
Full color animation for Junior Science film 
series: 23 television feature films for the Maggi 
Mc.\el}is Show (Picadilly Tobacco Co.); five 
television film programs for Assignment, U.S.A. 
National Telefilms) ; 18 Gate 15 shows. 
TV Commercials for Sapolin Paints. Colonial 
Airlines — Bermuda Flights. Colonial .\irlines — 
Canadian Flights. Waring Products Corp.. Ser- 
vel. Inc., H. C. Brill & Co. 

-Marathon T\ Newsreel. Im:. 

125 East 50th Street 

New York, N. Y. 

Phone: MUrray Hill 8-0985 

Date of Organization: 1948 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

Konstantin Kaiser, President & Exec. Producer 

Kenneth Baldwin. Supervisor of Production 

Lee Marcus. Distribution & Traffic Manager 

Services: Public information films. World-wide 
-News Service. Film editing, stock shots, special 
public relations assignments. 

Facilities: 16mm and 35nun camera equipment 
available. Complete editing facilities. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
-Motion Pictures: Helicopters in the News (Si- 
korsky Aircraft) ; First Trans-Atlantic Helicopter 
Flight (Sikorsky Aircraft) ; The Power to Fly 
( I nited .Aircraft Corp.) ; The Screen Story (Lu- 
mite I)iv., Chicopee Mills, Inc.) ; Clear Iron 
(The Budd Co.) 



The March of Time 

369 Lexington Avenue 

New York 17, N.Y. 

Phone: JUdson 6-1212 

C Reference details on recent productions 

and sponsors not submitted) 



MPO Productions. Inc. 
15 E. 53rd Street 
New York 22, N. Y. 
Phone : MUrray Hill 8-7830 
Date of Organization: 1946 
OFnCERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 
Judd L. Pollock, President and Treasurer 
Lawrence E. Madison, V.P. Stanley Resor, Secty. 
Irene Wilson. Prod. Ed. 
Joseph Moncure .March. Scenario Editor 
Jean Oser, Producer 
Jack Berch, Sales and Promotion Mgr. 
Sermces: Films for sales promotion and train- 
ing; public relations; information U.S. forces 
and government agencies; color sportsmens and 
consenation films. Television spot and films. 
Facilities: 16mm and 35mm cameras, lighting, 
sound truck, camera cars. etc. Reeves sound 
recorder. Cutting and projection rooms. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Motion Pictures: Out of the North (Nash Mo- 
tors) ; Garden-Wise. Monsanto '52 (Monsanto 
Chemical Co.) : Tomorrow Meets Today. Big and 
Basic. Low Cost for Leadership (Ford Motor 
Co.) ; Gunning the Flyways (Remington Arms 
Co.); .Miracle in the Sky (.American Airlines). 

Owen Murphy Productions. Inc. 

723 Seventh Avenue 

New York 19. N. Y. 

Phone: PLaza 7-8144 

Date of Organization: 1946 

OFTICERS and DEPARTMENT HEADS 

Ch\en Murphy, Pres.. Exec. Producer 

Elwood Siegel, General Manager 

Charles L. Turner. Production Manager 

Edward Boughton, Chief Film Editor 

Clifton Stokes, Director of Sales 

Lewis E. Gensler. TV Film Shows 

Walter Earley, Pittsburgh Representative 

Sermces: Motion pictures for industry and tele- 
vision; complete production; scripts, cinema- 
tography, editorial, recording: live and anima- 
tion. 

F.\ciUTlES: Full production facilities including 
cameras, lighting equipment. Reeves magnetic 
recording, mobile location unit, cutting rooms, 
recording room and stage. Permanent creative 
staff — WTiters, directors, cameramen and editors. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
-Motion Pictures: America's Future Highways, 
Life Is Priceless, For Your Safety (Firestone 
Tire and Rubber Co.) ; Communications for 
Civil Defense, This We Own, The Voice with 
the Smile Wins (.American Telephone & Tele- 
graph Co.). 

TV Commercials for Firestone, Philco, Ford, 
Chesterfield and others. 



1953 PRODUCTION REVIEW 



63 



XEW Y4IIIK t ITY: 



Stanley Neal Productions. Inc. 
45 Rockefeller Plaza 
New York 20. .\. Y. 
Phone: COIiiiiil.iis ,S-8335-6-7 
Date of Organization: 1933 
Chicago Office: 435 N. Michigan Ave. Chi- 
cago 11. 111.. Phone: WHitehall 4-3360. C. P. 
Goetz. midwest representative. PRODl'CTION: Neal 
Pictures. Inc.. Culver Cilv. Califdniia. Phone: 
TExas 0-2761. 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 
Slanle\- Neal. President 
Donald J. Lane. Vice ['resident 
B. J. Kohn. v. P. Pub. Relalwm 
Sobev Martin. Director 
Charles L. .Smith. Production Supervisor 
Edith -Martin. Script Director 
Charles W. Cromer. Creative Dept. 
Services: Sponsored training, public relations. 
sales training and consumers sales films: tele- 
vision films, specialized films in Kodachrome 
color. 

Facilities: Major studio equipment: mobile 
generator unit and equipment for location work: 
creative personnel and technical directors. 

RECENT PRODICTIONS AND SPONSORS 
MoTio.\ Pictures: Background for Home Dec- 
oration I Wallpaper Foundation I : Full length 
feature in production: Mahatma Ghandi — Ttven- 
tieth Century Prophet I American Academy of 
Asian Studies). Eight Drive-in Subjects for Ar- 
mour & Co. and 26 TV spots for Richfield 
Oil Co. 



Ted Nemeth Studios 

729 Seventh Avenue 

New York 19, N. Y. 

Phone: Circle 5-5147 

I Reference details not submitted) 



The Pathescope Company 
OF America, Inc. 

(Pathescope Productions) 

580 Fifth Avenue 

New York, N. Y. 

Office Phone: PLaza 7-5200 

Studio: 21-29 45th Rd., Long Island City, N.Y. 

Studio Phone: STillwell 4-3053 

Date of Organization: 1914 

OmCERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

Edward J. Lamm. President 

Robert Rubin. Executive Producer 

James Pierce. Production Control 

Services: Research, production and distribution 
of public, industrial relations, sales and job 
training and educational motion pictures and 
film strips: training films for U.S. .Armed 
Forces and television commercials and programs. 

Facilities: Studio with completely sound 
proofed shooting stage, full complement of light- 
ing equipment, sound room, synchronous tape 
equipment including studio microphone boom. 
Background projection unil and process screen. 
Carpentry and paint shops, make-up room, dress- 



Pathescope Productions: continued 
ing rooms and prop rooms. Editing and pro- 
jection equipment and facilities for both 16mm 
and 35nnn. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Motion Pictures: Rain or Shine, Here's How 
I General Electric I : Treasures for the Making 
I General Foods I: .\aval EslahlishmenI (U.S. 
Na\ v I : Sure Merchandising for Sure Profits 
I Seagram's I: 13 half-hour television programs 
The Hunter ( Cavalier Cigarettes ) . 
Sound Slidefilms: Seeing in the Rain (Trico 
Products Corp.) ; Look to the Leader (Westing- 
house). 

TV Commercials for Junket, Westinghouse, Fas- 
teeth. Carrier. Conoco. DuMonl, J. C. Penney. 
Q. T. Instant Frosting. Carling's Black Label 
Beer. Ballantine. Chevrolet. 



The Princeton Film Center. Inc. 

New York Sales Office 

270 Park Avenue 

New York. N. Y. 

Plaza 5-0322 

Malcolm Scott, Netv York Sales Manager 

( Studios and Headquarters in Princeton. N. J. ) 

Promotional Films Company, Inc. 
149 W. 51st Street 
New York 19, N.Y'. 



R.K.O. Pathe, Inc. 

625 Madison Avenue 

New York 22, N. Y. 

Phone: PLaza 9-3600 

Slinlio: 105 East 106th St., New York. N. Y'. 

Phone: S.\eramento 2-2600 

Date of Organization: 1931 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

Jay Bonafield, Executive Vice-President 

Douglas Travers, Vice-President, Charge 

of Production 

Robert S. Johnson. Television and 

Commercial Consultant 

Services: Industrial motion pictures; television 
film programs and commercials; U.S. Armed 
Forces and governmental agencies film programs. 

Facilities: Complete studio facilities with sound 
for both 35 & 16mm and permanent creative 
staffs in New York and Hollywood. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Motion Pictures: A Racing Heritage (N.Y. 
Stale Racing Assoc. I : Overseas Run (T.W.A. I : 
The Real Miss America (Defense Department! : 
.\ationai Education Week (National Education 
Assoc. I : Lights on — Vermont, Recruitment oj 
Children. Polio Congress ( National Foundation 
for Infantile Paralysis) : Information Please 
( TV program for Dan Golenpaul Associates I . 

Television Commercials for: S. C. Johnson 
& Co., Toni Co.. Dial Soap. Prom. T.W.A.. Bos- 
ton Gas Co. 



Robert Yak.nali, Richie 

Productions. Inc. 

9 West 6l8t Street 

New York 23, N. Y. 

Phone: Circle 6-0191 

Date of Organization: 1939 

Branch: 309 Oil and Gas Building, Houston, 

Texas. Phone: Blackstone 5471. 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

Robert Yarnall Richie, President 

Virginia G. Richie. Secretary-Treasurer 
Fredrick W. Bryant, Sales Manager 

Services: Motion pictures. Richie-graphs, slide- 
films and still photography, b&w or color. 
Scripting and story board treatments. Counsel 
on distribution. 

Facilities: Mitchell cameras, complete lighting 
for large sets and locations, shooting stage, re- 
cording facilities, location truck. Beechcraft 
Bonanza. Model animation, staff writers and di- 
rectors. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Motion Pictures : Equip for New Profit ( Luk- 
ens Steel Co. I ; The History of the Helicopter 
(Shell Oil Company) ; Through If By Sea (Sea- 
train Lines. Inc.) : Crossroads in the Deep (A. C. 
Glassell. Jr.) : Forests for the Future ( Celanese 
Corp. of America). 



Leslie Roush Productions, Inc. 
333 W. 52nd Street 
New York 19, N. Y. 
Phone: COIumbas 5-6430 
Date of Organization: 1944 
Studio and Shops: 130 Herricks Road, 
Mineola, L. I., N. Y. 
OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 
Leslie M. Roush, President 
Jules K. Sindic, Vice President 
John Fox. General Manager 
Charles D. Elms. Associate Producer 
James DiGangi. Production Manager 
Services: Industrial and commercial motion pic- 
tures, sound slidefilms. film-o-graphs. TV com- 
mercials and programs, animation. 
Facilities: Studios and shops in Mineola. 16 
& 35mm cameras, tape recorder, camera equip- 
ment including dollies and all necessaary lights 
and stands. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Ropes of Steel (Bethlehem 
Steel Co.): Speaking of Rubber (U.S. Rubber 
Co.) : A Future to Bank on (American Bankers 
Assoc): The Inside Story (National Tubercu- 
losis Assoc): Dacro P-38 (Crown Cork S Seal 
Co. ) : Ichabod — The Headless Man ( Assoc of 
American Railroads) : Casualty Power System 
( U.S. Navy ) . 

Sound Slidefilms: Stock Sentinels ( Radio Corp. 
of America ) : Water Heater Salesmen ( General 
Electric ) . 

TV Commercials for Goodyear Tire Co.. Can- 
ada Dry. National Biscuit Co.. Seeman Bros.. 
Inc. American Telephone & Telegraph. Benrus. 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 




iiLiiik^iiiai 






A Report On 

Sponsored Film 

Distribution 



.V^: , ^^ 



/'/ The Power of the Motion Picture Medium — Sound motion pic- 
tures, combining the effectiveness of undivided seeing with uninterrupted 
listening, are a most powerful means of reaching men's minds and influencing 
their pattern of behavior. 

Industry, with a story that must be told, has recognized the inherent advan- 
tage of the film medium and has successfully used it to record the activities 
that make up the American business scene. Through the sponsored film, 
hundreds of companies and associations are presenting valuable knowledge 
in order that the American people will have a better understanding of the 
operations of a free economy, an entire industry, or a single company. 

Sponsored Films are Now Reaching Millions . . . they are being 
shown to students and parent organizations in schools — to homemakers in 
community clubs and churches — to rural audiences in theatreless towns- — 
to employees in plants and offices — to the millions of active Americans 
organized in clubs, lodges, societies and unions that meet each week or 
month for fellowship and discussion. They are being shown in the majority 
of the nation's 20,000 motion picture theatres and now Television opens up 
o vast new audience potential for the sponsored motion picture. 



MATCHING THE POWER OF TODAY'S SPONSORED FILMS 



TO THE GREATEST AUDIENCE IS A JOB FOR SPECIALISTS... 




rKAincu rcKduiMncL 



3rCV.IMLi^CU IVI>IV^ VVI.CUV7C 



MODERN 



RVICE, INC, 




a nationwide network 
exclusively devoted to 
sponsored film distribution 

For more than 20 years Modern Talking Picture Service has cJevoted its energies exclu- 
sively to the development and accomplishment of sponsored film distribution. 

Acting for the sponsor, Modern relates the purpose of the film program to the interests of 
the audience to obtain shov^ings that will result in attainment of the over-all objective. 

Singleness of purpose, efficient organization, and years of experience are combined in 
Modern to make sure that each film program is successfully presented through any or all of 
four channels of distribution opportunity. 



4 channels of film distribution 




IdMtH MdicHces 

Practically every group that meets anywhere — 
under any circumstances — owns, has access to, or 
can borrow 16mm sound projection equipment. 
More than 500,000 16mm sound projectors have 
been manufactured since 1940 to supply this ever 
growing mass audience. As each audience selects 
the time, place and the film program, the sponsor's 
message reaches on interested group under the most 
favorable circumstances in the best possible en- 
vironment. A sponsor, wishing to reach these 
people can select categories of audiences con- 
sidered most valuable for his purpose in the geo- 
graphical locations constituting his market. 




Motion Picture Zkeatres 

Motion picture theatres represent another econom- 
ical and effective channel of mass circulation avail- 
able through Modern. The subject matter must be 
of general interest presented in such a way that 
theatre audiences will accept it as port of the regu- 
lar theatre program. Although preferred length is 
one reel (10 minutes), effective circulation can be 
accomplished with suitable pictures of longer 
length. Many sponsors moke a special 10-minute 
version of their regular film for theatrical release. 
Bookings can be arranged in chain and independ- 
ent theatres: first-run neighborhood, and drive-in. 




Kural Koadskows 

Roadshows provide on opportunity to reach a rural 
and resort market during the summer months. Road- 
shows also open a new market and supplementary 
use for TV shorts and commercials. Showings ore 
held out of doors each week in theatreless towns. 
They are underwritten by merchants who remain 
open for business on show night providing a close 
approach to point-of-sale merchandising with film. 
The average attendance at these showings is about 
400 persons. More than 1,500 communities are 
available for sponsored film roodshowings during 
the summer season in the rural Midwest. 




Zdevision Showings 

Television stations will use sponsored motion pic- 
tures on a free sustaining basis, provided they are 
in the public interest as interpreted by individual 
stations after preview. They prefer films of 13'/2 or 
27 minutes running time. Many existing sponsored 
films ore suitable for TV release or con be adapted 
with minor changes. Modern has regular contact 
with all operating television stations and has be- 
come a preferred source of free sustaining film ma- 
terial. Although acceptance of sponsored films 
varies with the subject matter and treatment, 
one film distributed by Modern was shown by 79 
TV stations in a 12 month period. 





rMV.1 ki 1 1 c J 



1 

AUDIENCE 




fiffl^^ 


mm 


SELECTION 


I'JP'^ JH 






By type 


)w1 ' 






Group interest 


■ B 






'~^'°* 


Market area 


aM ■: 






City size 


Id 






^ 


PROFESSIONAL 






1 


FILM CARE 

Top print condition 


^^^Bh^sTIK^— 


i 


1 


Longer life 


Sf^^^bv'KI 


Satisfied film users 


^^^^^ "^^^^mhUjh ^\B|y|»^ 



oaern ca 




-Objectiv 



asmatit 



PRECISE 
CONTROLS 

Comprehensive per- 
formance reports 
Audience analysis 
IBM accuracy 



ACCESSIBILITY 

27 Libraries 

Rapid print movemen 

Less transportation 
cost 

Closer audience 
contact 



J« 



.omples of more than 200 sponsored film 
THese five cose Histor.es ore o. ^^^ ^^^^^^^.^^.^^^ ^^^, ^^,, 

p,ogron,s distributed by Modern. They ^^^ .^^^^^^ 

L.,_dfi.s.nder^..^s^^^^^^^^^^ 

1 ^nUina up these audiences, 
the people making up 



A basic food processor released a highly specialized film on recipes. 
Objecfive — product Identification with new method of food preparation. 
Primary Audience — home economics classes. Results after 5 years of circu- 
lation to 16mm audiences: 



High Schools and ColUgat 31,079 

Women's Clubs and Churches 1.371 
Other Audiences 1,905 



Total oudiertce 
Total ottendon 



]4,3:S 
2,716,971 



A teacher's manual and recipe book were sent to each audience in advance 
of the showing with a return business reply order cord for additional ma- 
terial. More than 50% of the oudiences requested supplementary material. 



A corporation processing natural resources produced a public informa- 
tion film on conservation. Audience specifications — All types of audiences^ 
All channels of circulation. Cumulative results: 



Chonnel of CIrculotion 




Allcndonie 


16mm Audiences 


57,827 audiences 


8,809,514 


Rural Roadshow 


3,875 towns 


1,548,583 


Motion Picture Theatres 


10,331 theatres 


14,754,868 



Total Attendance 25,112,965 
36 stations report 6,237,904 Viewers 

The film continues in popular demand. Comments on show reports indicate 
excellent audience reaction. 



A petroleum company specified moss circulation to all types of audiences 
for a public relations film. Three channels of circulation were used the first 
yeor with the following results: 



Chonnel ol Cixulolion 




Attendant* 


16mm Audiences 


9,749 audiences 


1,402,874 


Rural Roadshow 


1,170 towns 


505,273 


Motion Picture Theatres 


4,429 theotres 


8,349,782 



Total Circulation — One Year 10.257,929 

Results given above reflect a single year's activity. 16mm audiences that 
have seen the film now number more than 20,000 and will continue to in- 
crease at the rate of 10,000 audiences per year. 



A trade association sponsored a film on safety. Prirrtary audience — 
schools and youth groups in rural areas and selected larger cities where 
accidents hod happened. Results: 



Over 50,000 
2,500 to 50,000 
Under 2,500 

Totals 



2,433 
3,948 
10,513 

16,894 



454,993 

740.108 

1,965,211 

3,159,674 



These results were achieved by directing promotion to Itnown audiences in 
rural areas (smaller towns) and the designated larger cities — on example 
of Modern's audience classification system which permits controlled pro- 
motion. 



An automobile manufacturer developed o comprehensive sales promo- 
tion film program. Objeciive — moximum adult coverage with close zone 
office control and dealer tie-ins. Modern certified the following 16mm cir- 
culation in one year: 

Type of Audivnce No. of Audiences Atton^anto 

263,147 
295,129 
101,862 
131,817 
245482 
84.997 

Tolol Audiencec— One Year 10,071 1,122.534 

The program has been expanded and Is now in its third yeor of activity. 



Men's Groups 


2.993 


Industrial 


2.272 


Churches 


1.500 


Other Adult Groups 


1.165 


High Schools — Colleges 


1.335 


Youth Groups 


706 




Sponsored Film Distribution 
With Precision and Quality 

From start to finish — from controlled promotion to precise and useful 
reports — Modern Talking Picture Service provides quality and precision in 
the distribution of the sponsored film. 

The sponsored motion picture has a dimension that is unlike any other 
media — the viewer or listener must be inspired to ask for the sponsor's mes- 
sage. Accordingly, in the preparation of promotional material, the interest 
of the audiences must be matched with the sponsor's objective. Campaigns 
must be planned to exert their efforts at the right time in the right amounts to 
the right audiences. Promotional controls must be employed to develop the 
volume interest needed for full and continuous activity of 500 prints or 
specialized interest in programs of 50 prints or less. 

Normal promotion effort includes catalogue mailings, special group 
picture promotions, single picture promotional fliers, window displays, se- 
lected advertising, user convention exhibits, and personal contact ... a full 
and effective use of all promotional methods. 

To direct this promotion to the exact audiences specified by the sponsor 
we have classified all audiences within our files by type and interest; by 
geographical area, city size, and metropolitan markets. These audiences 
look to Modern as a reliable source of good sponsored films and are served 
by our regional film libraries strategically located in major cities. 

The accessibility of Modern film libraries is an advantage to film user and 
sponsor alike — the film user enjoys greater convenience and lower trans- 
portation costs — the sponsor can have his branch offices and dealers make 
greater use of the film and will benefit from more bookings per print through 
elimination of waste shipping time. 

An example of the efficiencies of the special processes we employ is our 
comprehensive installation of IBM tabulating equipment. This equipment 
permits precise control and supplies detailed analyses of the activity of each 
program. Advance notices of each booking, with extra copies for field and 
dealer tie-in, keeps the sponsor in daily contact with his program. Tabulated 
monthly circulation reports give attendance statistics in convenient form. 
Audience comment reports provide information for accurate appraisal of 
film acceptance and special market or audience studies furnish qualitative 
analysis of circulation. 

Modern is a capable organization of specialists whose knowledge and 
experience will help you toward the efficient and economical attainment 
of your film objectives. 

You can receive additional informafion abouf Modern's 
services by phoning or writing any of the offices listed below. 



27 film libraries 
strtrtegically located. 



NEW YORK: 45 Rockefeller Plo 
JUdson 6-3830 



CHICAGO: 140 East Ontario Str 
DEIaware 7-3252 



PHILADELPHIA: 243 South Broad Street 
KIngsley 5-2500 



LOS ANGELES: 612 South Flower Street 
MAdison 9-2121 



IVEW YORK riTY! 



Sarra. Incorporated 

S.ARRA. I\c. 200 E. 5f)th St.. New York 22, 

N. Y. Phone: MUrray Hill 8-0085. 
Valentino Sarra. Presirleiil: Morris Behrend, 
General Manager, and full staff for produc- 
tion located at N. Y. studios. I see listing 
under Chicago. Illinois i 



Alan Shilin Productions, Inc. 

450 W. 56th Street 

New York 19, N. Y. 

Phone: PLaza 7-1270 

( Reference details on recent productions 

not available at time of publication i 



Fletcher Smith Studios, Inc. 

321 E. 44th Street 

New York 17. N. Y. 

Phone: MUrray Hill 5-6626 

(Reference details on recent productions & 

sponsors not submitted.) 



Science Pictures, Inc. 

5 E. 57th Street 

New York 22, N.Y. 

Phone: PLara 9-8532 

Branch: 1737 "H" St. NW, Washington 6. 

Contact: Sidney A. Gerbich 

Phone: EXecutive 3-1092 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

Rene Bras, President 

Francis C. Thayer, V. P. and Treas. 

John L. Thayer, Manager 

Slide Film & Motion Slide Div. 

Robert Collinson. Chief Film Editor 

Services: 16 & 35mm sound motion pictures, 
filmstrips. motion slide films for industry: ani- 
mation. 

Facilities: Animation stands, complete cutting 
rooms, title and art department, projection 
rooms, sound studio, magnetic tape recording, 
scripting. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Motion Pictlres: Cable Crossing (Phelps- 
Dodge Copper Prods.) ; The Science of Making 
Brass ( Chase Brass & Copper Co. I ; series of 3 
Xursing Care in Poliomyolitis I National Foun- 
dation for Infantile Paralysis I: Contemporary 
Silver smithing (Handy & Harmon). 

FiLMSTRll'S: Industrial Advertising in a Selling 
Economy I Fortune I: Opportunities for All 
I State Department! : Seeds oj Knouledge (Unit- 
ed Nations I: Annual Jobholders Meeting (Pit- 
ney-Bowcs I : Life series. 



* * * Biild-facc stars appearing over listings 
indicate advertising accepted for publication and 
appearing in this issue. 



Sound Masters, Inc. 

165 West 46th Street 

New York 36. N.Y. 

Phone: PLaza 7-6600 

Date of Organization: 1937 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

W. French Githens, Chairman 

Harold E. Wondsel. President 

Francis Carter Wood, Jr., Fice Pres. and Secty. 

Walter Kullberg, Treasurer 

William Forest Crouch, TV Exec. Producer 

Frank Donovan. Producer-Director 

Charles Bellante, Production Manager 

Robert Rosien, Sound Engineer 

Services: Motion pictures. TV spots, slidefilms 
and editorial service. 

Facilities: Usual production equipment and 
personnel plus three screening rooms, a sound 
stage, recording studios equipped for 16 & 35mm 
optical recording. 16mm six line variable area 
optical reciirding. complete editing and cutting 
rooms. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Motion Pictures: Telephone Repair Service 
I American Telephone and Telegraph I : Research 
( American Newspaper Publishers Assoc. I : Fabu- 
lous Fishin' in South America (Johnson Motors. 
South Bend Bait Co.. Pan American-Grace .Air- 
ways and Panagral: The Aeic Plymouth An- 
nouncements I Plymouth ) : Life Lines oj Defense 
( N.Y. Telephone Co. I : CMC Underwater Tank 
6.v6. Cadillaac Walker Tank, McArthur I isits 
Lansing and Oldsmobile Plant. Otter. Amphibi- 
ous Carrier ( General Motors I : The Command 
that Dooms, Kampong Sentosa. The Road to 
Kota Tinggi ( State Department I . 
TV Commercials for Bristol-Myers. Atlantic Re- 
fining C... Chrvsler-Plvmouth. 



Henry Straus & Co.. Inc. 

668 Fifth Avenue 
New York 36. N. Y. 
Phone: JUdson 2-3893 
Date of Organization: 1951 
OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 
Henry Strauss. Executive Producer 
Walter Raft. Production Manager 
Robert Wilmot. Head of Creative Direction 
Mar\in Dreyer. Editing 
Anne Payde. Research 
Services: Motion pictures, semi-animation, mo- 
tion-slide films and slide films primarily in the 
field of attitude development and training as 
well as other coordinated communications. 

Facilities: Everything necessary for production. 

RECENT PRODICTIONS AND SPONSORS 
.Motion Pictires: A'eit- Horizons, Stolen Time 
(Pan American World Airways!: Man Made 
Troubles ( American Telephone & Telegraph t . 

SoiNU Sl-IDEFILMS: You the Trainer i Pan 
Ameriran I : Team \ursinp i Johnson S Jnhn- 
son I . 



Sturgis-Grant Productions, Inc. 

314 East 46th Street 

New York 17, N. Y. 

Phone: MUrray Hill 9-4994 

Date of Organization: 1948 

OmCERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

Warren Sturgis. President 

Dwiimell Grant, Vice President, Art Dir. 

M. C. Romilly. Sec.-Treas.. Gen. Mgr. 

William D. .Stoneback, Production Manager 

Harry M. Hirschhorn. Sales Manager 

Services: Educational and technical films and 
filmstrips in the medical and scientific fields; 
animation of all types. 

Facilities: Live action and animation camera 
crews trained for medicinal, surgical and sci- 
entific work; 16mm equipment; studio; sets; 
editing; medical and scientific script writing 
sUff. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictires: Patent Ductus Arteriosus (E. 
R. Squibb & Sons) : The Management of Shock 
with Polyvinyl Pyrrotidone (Schenley Labora- 
tories. Inc. I : Total Pelvic Evisceration for Can- 
cer (George T. Pack. M.D.I: Living Insurance 
I Idaho Cancer Society!; Mitrel Commissuroto- 
my (The Catholic Charities of the Archdiocese 
of New York! : Lumbosacral Spirud Fusion with 
Metallic Plate Fixation (New York Society for 
the Relief of the Ruptured & Crippled) : Simpli- 
fied Craniolome Technic for Osteoplastic Flap 
(J. .Arthur MacLean. M.D.) : Kronlein Opera- 
tion ( Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center) . 
SoiND SUDEFILMS: .Anatomy and Physiology — • 
the Respiratory System. Anatomy and Physiology 
-the Male Reproductive System (U.S. Army); 
Teaching English ^erie^ i Georgetown Univer- 
sity I . 



John Sutherland Productions 
John Sutherland Productions, Inc., 60 E. 
42nd Street. New York 17, N.Y. Phone: 
MUrray Hill 7-7815. 

(Complete listing in Los .Angeles section) 



Telenews Productions. Ini:. 

630 Ninth Avenue 
New York 36, N. Y. 
Phone: JUdson 6-2450 
Date of Organization: 1948 
Herbert Scheflel. President 
Specialists in news and sports subjects for tele- 
vision, including The Teleneus Daily, This Week 
in Sports, For /> omen Only, etc. No data avail- 
able on recent productions and s|Miiis(irs other 
than t.v. conniien ials. 



Paul R. Thoma 

37 East 49th St. 

New York. N. Y. 

Phone: PLaza 8-3306 

I Reference details on recent productions & 

sponsors not submitted. ! 



1953 I'Kl) 1» I CT 1 t) N K K \ I K\\ 



Tom LIN Film Productions 

480 Lexington Avenue 

New York 17. N. Y. 

Phone: PLaza 8-3070 

Date of Organization: 1939 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

Frederick A. Tomlin. President 
Mary D. Tomlin. Secretary-Treasurer 
Carl A. Tomlin, lice President 
Ogden Brower. Sales Manager 
Services: 16 & 35mm motion pictures: indus- 
trial, educational, training, sales presentations. 
TV commercials and panel shows, editing, ani- 
mation, film strips, slides. 

Facilities: Studio, Maurer camera. 4 Cine 
specials, Arriflex camera, Rangerette tape re- 
corder, Rangertone tape recorder, animation 
stand, editing facilities. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Motion Pictures: 3Q0W Class Seiving Machine 

(The Singer Sewing Machine Co.) : The Diesel 
Story (American version). Technical Report 

(FOA-Sx), Technical Report (IONAD-17). 

(Shell Oil Co.) : Oh Baby 13 TV subjects (The 
Mennen Co.). 

FiLMSTRIPS: Big Sales from Small Homes (Bates 
Fabrics) ; The Story Behind Good Housekeeping 
Seal (Hearst Publications) : Cumulative Trends 
and the Man Market (Argosy) : Jackie Gleason 

(Columbia Broadcasting System) ; Matteson 
Mattress (Lynn Baker) ; Camay Growth (Proc- 
tor & Gamble). 

TV COMMERCIAI-S for Palmolive-Peet Co.. Lig- 
gett & Myers, A & P Eastern Div.. R. J. Rey- 
nolds Tobacco Co., The Texas Co., General 
Motors. Pabst Brewing Co.. Spratts Patent Ltd. 

Tradeways. Inc. 

285 Madison Avenue 
New York 17, N. Y. 
Phone: OR 9-3070 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

W. H. Lough. President 

R. E. Taylor. Vice President 

Marian Frisbie. Production Manager 

Services: Slidefilms. recorded cases, motion pic- 
ture scripts, manuals. 
Facilities: Photo retouching studio. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Sound Slidefilms: When You Sell Grey-Rock 
(U.S. Asbestos Div. Raybestos-Manhattan Co.) ; 
The Best Picture by Far, Step Up Your Sales, 
A Management Technique (General Electric 
Co.): Proudly We Wear (LIS. Army Recruit- 



Training Films, Inc. 

150 West 54th Street 

New York 19, N. Y. 

Phone: COlumbus 5-3520 

Date of Organization: 1947 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

Ralph Bell Fuller, President, Prod. Mgr. 

J. H. Rose. Comptroller 

Elwood M. Frye, Art Director 

Robert G. Taylor, Director of Sales 



Training Films: continued 
AQiliated with Dynamic Films, Inc., 112 West 
89th Street, New York City 24. Phone: TRafal- 
gar 3-6221. 

Services: Filmstrips, motion pictures, slide 
presentations, easels. Projection equipment, 
booklet.', leader guides, and posters. Consulta- 
tion and distribution. 

Facilities: Creative department for research and 
script writing: art department: photographic 
department; sound studios, animations. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Sound Slidefilms: The Open Door (James Lees 
& Sons Co.): Story of Lost Money (McKes- 
son & Robbins Inc.) ; Yugoslavia, Port of New 
York, Japan, Our Underwater Defense (Life) ; 
Penny-Wise Kitchens (WoMANS Home Com- 
panion) : This Week Magazine I'ieus the Drug 
Neics (This Week) . 



Transfilm Incorporated 

35 W. 45th Street 

New York 19, N.Y. 

Phone: LUxemburg 2-1400 

Date of Organization: 1941 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

William Miesegaes, President 

Walter Lowendahl, Executive Vice President 

William Burnham. Exec. V. P. 

Peter Schlenker, Treas. 

Robert L. Klaeger, V. P., Production 

Joop Geesink. Co-Produ-cer, Dollyivood — 

Amsterdam, Holland 
Richard de Rochemont, Consulting Producer 

Services: Staff of 105 in departments covering 
production of motion pictures, slidefihiis and 
still photography. Representatives in San Fran- 
cisco, Scranton. Pa.. Santa Fe, N. M.. and Provi- 
dence, R. I. 

Facilities: Two air-conditioned sound stages, 
studios, shops and ofiBces all in Transfihn 
Building. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Oil, the Invisible Traveler 
(Shell Oil Co.) ; Telegram for America (Western 
Union) ; The Story of Packaging (Continental 
Can Co.) ; Take It Easy, Bill (General Baking 
Co.): PSP, Food for Thought (General Foods 
Co.) ; Salesmanship Series (McGraw-Hill) ; Pen- 
tids (E. R. Squibb & Sons); Who's a Rabbit 
(Greater N.Y. Fund); Story of Thread Manu- 
facture (Spool Cotton Co.); The Transistor 
Story (American Telephone & Telegraph) ; Guid- 
ed Missiles (Raytheon Mfg.). 

Sound Slidefilms: Batteries Are Profitable 
(Atlas Supply Co.); The ACC Sale, Go for 
Double. Hon to Expand Your Home. Come 
Down to Earth (Armstrong Cork Co.): Top of 
the Heap, Make Your Own Weather (Carrier 
Corp.) ; Between Friends (Institute of Life In- 
surance) ; Out of This World (General Electric) ; 
Sylvania Gives You the Facts (Sylvania Electric 
Products) ; The Neiv 950, The AU Winter Win- 
ner (National Carbon Co.) ; A Cake Baking 
Miracle (General Foods) ; etc. 



Unifilms 

146 E. 47th Street 
New York 17. N. Y. 
Phone: MUrray Hill 8-9325 
Studios: 329 East 47th St. 
Branch: 225 S. 15th St., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Phone: Khifisley .5-8013 
Date of Organization: 1949 
OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 
Charles E. Gallagher, President 
Elliott Pew. I ice President, Sales 
James H. Townsend, Jr.. Vice President 
James R. Lee, Secretary and Treasurer 
Richard Maury. Senior Writer 
Doris Strong, Personnel and Casting 
Arline Garson. Editing Depl. 
Hill Bermont. Studio Manager 
Services: Theatrical and non-theatrical motion 
pictures for Industry, Institutions. Associations 
and Government. Television commercials and 
programs. Stop motion. Semi and full cell ani- 
mation. Specialty: The narrative drama treat- 
ment of training, sales, and public relations' 
problems. 

Facilities: 8000 square feet including: 90 foot 
sound stage, dressing room, still' photo lab, 
shop, film vault, art department, cutting rooms, 
sound master control room, narration booths. 
16nim and 35mm newsreel and blimped studio 
cameras. Animation camera and special effects 
equipment. Complete production equipment. 
Camera top station wagon. Custom built record- 
ing system for handling ^4 inch magnetic tape, 
IT'^mni and 16mm film plus special facilities 
for multi channel mixing. Music library. Full 
creative staff. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Motion Pictures: Sunoco Leads Again, a com- 
pany relations film (Sun Oil Co.) ; Brass Means 
Business (Titan Metal Mfg. Co.) : Mr. Stupid 
Carelessness (National Board of Fire Under- 
writers) ; C/o5e Call for Jimmy (Baltimore & 
Ohio Railroad); The RPM Lawnboy (RPM 
Manufacturing Co.) : Not by Chance (Pennsyl- 
vania Railroad). 



Van Praag Productions 

1600 Broadway 
New York 19, N. Y. 
Phone: PLaza 7-2857 
Date of Organization: 1950 
OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 
William Van Praag, President 
Marc S. Asch. Vice President 
Gilbert M. Williams. Production Manager 
Services: Documentary, commercial, television, 
industrial films: both studio and location, 16 
and 35nim black-and-white and color. 
Facilities: Complete location equipment and 
personnel. Complete studio crews. Complete cut- 
ting and editing facilities. .\rt department. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Motion Pictures: Lincoln-Mercury (Ford Mo- 
tor Co.) ; New Product, etc. (Esso-Standard 
Oil); Howdy Doody Circus, etc. (Continental 
Baking) : Behind the Space Cadet ( Kellogg Co.) ; 
Rybutol Spots (Vitamin Corp. of America) ; Col- 
gate Shave Cream (Colgate, Palmolive, Peet). 

(continued on THE FOLLOWING PACE 68) 



66 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



4f//cAe// 

PROFESSIONAL EQUIPMENT 
FOR PROVEN 



PROFESSIONAL RESULTS 




16mm PROFESSIONAL 



.fl 




The Same Professional 
Features Whether You Choose A 



/Pf/fcAe// 



Years-ahead smooth, positive operation has 
made the famed Mitchell 35mm Cameras the 
ovcrwheImin>; choice of major studios. Incor- 
porating; the same advanced truly professional 
35mm features, the Mitchell ■■I6" l^rofcs- 
sional" Camera is beini; selected as the stand- 
ard equipment of more and more commercial 
producers. The herttai;c of superior design 
and matchless workmanship of Mitchell 
Omcras is known and proven each day by 
the creators of the worta's finest films. 



AND ONLY 



mycAe// 



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666 WEST HARVARD STRUT • GLENDALE 4, CALIFORNIA • CABLE ADDRESS: 'MITCAMCO* 

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rT« 85% of tbt metion picturts shown in thootros throufhout tho world oro filmod with ■ Mitcholl 



1953 PRODUCTION REVIEW 



:VEW YORK < ITV: 



Video Pictures Corporation 

41 East 50th Street 

New York 22, N. Y. 

Phone: MUrray Hill 8-1162 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

\^'illiaiii R. noiriiig. President, Treasurer 

Martin Henry. Vice President 

v.. M. Rice. Secretary 

Services: Facilities for niotidii picture produc- 
tion — television programs. TV commercials and 
industrial films — animation supplied. 
Faciutie.s: Stage 55' x 80', RCA scuirid equip- 
iiiciit. Id i .iSmni. magnetic la]K and acetate re- 
ccirdiiig. U) & .'^Smni Mitchell cameras. 

RECENT PRODIICTION.S AND SPONSORS 
Motion Prtihes: Kip Van Smith. Salesnet 
( Westinghouse Electric Corp. 1 ; Trapped ( Har- 
vey Marlowe). No other data submitted mi 
business film sponsors or productions. 

Roger Wade Productions 

15 West 46th Street 

New York 19, N. Y. 

Phone: Circle 7-6797 

Date of Organization: 1946 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

Roger Wade. Owner 

George Heideman. Studio Manager 

Services: Motion pictures, black-and-white and 
color, sound slidefilnis. slide presentations. TV 
commercial?. 

Facilities: Studio with cutting room, dark 
rooms, animation stand. 16 5. 35mm cameras, 
complete still equipment and processing fa- 
cilities. 

RECENT PRODCCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Motion Pictures: Washington — Shrine oj 
American Patriotism I B&O Railroad) . 
Sound Slidefilms: The Seallest Story (National 
Dairy Products): Planning Your Estate (Solo- 
mon Huber Assoc. I : Program jor Progress I Life 
Underwriters' Training Council) . 



Wilding Picture Productions, Inc. 

Wilding Picture Productions, Inc., 385 Madi- 
son Avenue, New York, N.Y. Phone: PLaza 
9-0854. J. W. Inglefield, vice president. 

I See complete listing under Chicago, 111. ) 



WiLLARD Pictures, Inc. 
45 West 45th Street 
New York 36. N. Y. 
Phone: LUxemburg 2-0430 
Date of Organization: 1932 
Branch OfTiee: Editorial. Cutting. Projection. Re- 
cording, Animation: 550 Fifth Avenue, 
New York City 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

T. W. WiUard, President 

John M. Squiers, Jr., Vice Pres., Gen. Mgr. 



I) illnni P,rl„r,s: ,;mliu,ir,l 

Services: Industrial, medical, educational, sales 
and job training motion pictures and slidefilms; 
training films for U. S. Armed Forces and Gov- 
ernmental agencies; theatricals: television film 
shows and commercials. 

Facilities: Mitchell NC cameras and camera- 
top station wagons, portable generators, field 
sound recording instruments; pioneer in indus- 
try techniques and equipment; color production 
in East and South America for theatrical pro- 
ducers; animation department: projection and 
cutting rooms; creative staff. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Motion Pictures: Formula for Profit (Lederle 
Laboratories I : Captain Kicid { National Broad- 
casting Co. ) : Banana Diseases ( United Fruit 
Co. I : J our Income Tax I American Institute of 
Accountants I : Abaca (Plymouth Cordage Co.) ; 
Art Points the (Toy ( Binnev and Smith Co.). 
Also several films each for: U.S. Navy. U.S. 
Steel. Girl Scouts of America, and United Fruit. 
TV Commercials for 97 clients and East Coast 
shooting for Warner Brothers Pictures. Inc. 

Emerson Y^orke Studio 

245 W. 55th 

New York 19, N. Y. 

Emerson Yorke, Owner 

( Reference details on recent productions & 
sponsors not submitted.) 



Raphael G. Wolff Studios 

N. Y. Office: 330 Park Avenue 

New York 22. N. Y. 

Phone: PLaza 5-5386 

Dicran Nahigian, Eastern Representative 

I Complete listing in Los Angeles section) 



if C] IM-Af □ 



MIDDLE ATLANTIC 



I New Jersey. N. Y., Penn.. W ashinjiton. D.C. I 

>'o\v .l»»rs«'y 

* -f * 

The Princeton Film Center, Inc. 
270 Park Avenue 

New York, N. Y. 

PLaza 5-0322 

Studio and Headquarters 

Carter Road, Princeton. New Jersey 

Plione- 1-3550 

Date of Organization: 1940 

New York Sales Office: 270 Park Ave. Phone; 

PLaza 5-0.S22. Malcolm Scott, rep. in charge. 

officers AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

Gordon Knox. President 

Jack Barlass. Executive Vice Presiden' 

A. C. Califano. Business Manager 

L. 11. Holton. Production Manager 

.Sherman Price. Director of Distribution 

Bradford Cross. District Manager 

Robert Webb and Carlo Arcamone, Film Editors. 

Sumner Lyon and John Capsis, Scenarists 



Film Ci-tili 



itinucd 



Sekmcks: I'riJiluii rs of spi liai purpose motion 
[)ictures. tele\ ision programs on film; television 
commercials. Nationwide distributors of spon- 
sored and television films. 

Facilities; Kmiin and 35nnn cameras; sound 
stage. Western Electric sound system, mobile 
sound location truck, mobile generator. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPON.SORS 
Motion Pictures: Via Port oj New York fPort 
of N.Y. Authority I : 221 I American Kennel 
Club) : Micro-wave Relay & Coaxial Cable 
(American Telephone & Telegraph) Glass. Sci- 
ence & People (Kimble Glass Company) : Open 
Road (Bethlehem Steel Company) : Fabric Magic 
(Deering. Milliken & Co.) : Double Feature 
(Yale & Towne Mfg. Co.) : Canaries Are Fun 
(R. T. French Co.). 
Television: Omnibus TV Series (Ford Founda- 



On Film. Inc. 

Princeton. Ne\\ Jer^e\ 

Phone: Belle Mead 3200 

Branches: New York City and Los Angeles 

Date of Organization: June. 1951 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

R. Bell. President 

F. E. Johnston. Treasurer 

Tracy Ward. Executive Producer 

Constance Garvin. Business Manager 

\ ngvar Haslestad. Production Control Dir. 

Leslie Crocker. Dir. oj Photography 

Barbara Norris. Executive Director 

Gene Collins. Art Director 

Irving Jewell, Sales Manager 

Halford Jay. Office Manager 

Services: Motion pictures and slidefilms for in- 
dustry. Government, agriculture and television. 
Public Relations. Sales promotion, merchandis- 
ing, medical and training films. 
Facilities: 16mm and 35mm cameras, 7500 sq. 
ft. sound stage, animation stand and camera, art 
department, staff writers, directors, cameraman, 
editor and artists. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
.Motion Pictures: Your Garden State Parkway 
(New Jersey Highway Authority I : Purposes oj 
Education (Atlantic City School System): The 
Facts oj the Case ( N. J. Milk Industry Assoc. ) ; 
River at your Door (Johnson and Johnson). 
Sound Slidefilms: What Makes Sammy Sell, 
Masker Aid. (Industrial Tape Corp.) Surgical 
Dressings (Johnson and Johnson); Grocery 
Business ( Personal Products Corp.) : It's in Your 
Hands (Division of Cormnunily Services — 
."^tate of N. J.^ 

>'e\v York Citato 

McLarty Picture Productions 

45-47 Stanley Street 

Buffalo 6, New York 

Phone: Taylor 0332 

Date of Organization: 1934 

(CONTINUED ON FOLLOWING PAGE 70) 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



Compare Avith any other 

Color Duplicating Film . . . 
then you'll insist on ANSCO TYPE 238! 





IVrliaps \.m haven't yer Jiso.VfR-d 


B^ i: 


^1 


C 




■ 




how much twlrd iipf;-,il your Kmiiu 
ii-lease prints have when they're 


^^^^ 


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k-S^ 


^^H 


^^k 




iiKide on Ansco Color Diiphcating 




v' '^1 


^^ 


^^^^^^1 


^^^H 




Kihii, Type 23X. 




K 


^^^^A 


^^^^H 


^^H 




It not. do yourself the tavor ot 




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^^^1 


^^H 




idmparing a print on Ansco lype 


•^^^^^B 


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^^^H 




23>< with one on ,niy nthi-r diiplictilim 










r^^9 




Compare them carefully and 


IH 


ll... 






JH 




\ ou'll find that Ansco gives you these 


\- . .'-:: - 


BBH^' 


A 


W^ ^ ^tti^ 


l^^^l 




distinct advantages: 


a 


^^^p 


M 


^^y^jH|| 


^^H 




1 More faithful color. 


1 


flH^^ 




i^^[^l 


^H 




2 Higher-fidelity sound. 




J^^^^' 




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^H 




3 Cleaner, whiter whites. 


^i|^ 


^^ 1 .^^fe:- 


^ 


"fl^^l 


^H 




4 Sliarper definition. 


■ 


/ 




V 




■ 


^^^ 


im 


Kfejg^f^^^Sg^^ 


fl 



Rcmeiiilicr, the priIlt^ sou release are the nujst powertul 
representatives yiiu ha\e in the tielil. Kxcellcnt ones can 
bring vou new Inisiness, while iiidittercnt ones nia\ drive 
old customers aw aw That's w h\ it's good husiness tor \ ou to 
make this comparison and win it's /h-ttrr hii.\'uii-ss to insist 
that ever\ i()mm color release print ) ou deliver is made on 
Ansco Type 2 :;8! 



Fast processing 

through New York, 

Chicago and 

Hollywood 



Ansco ,. 



nuhaniton. \. 'S'. A Division of General Aniline \ lilin Corpor ition. "/'/ow Resfarch to Realily 



1953 J'ROI) I (T 10 N REVIKVi 



AIIIMILIi: ATLAIVTIC: 



McLarty Picture Productions: continued 

OFnCERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 
Henn- D. McLarty, Owner and Exec. Prod. 
Clement F. Stigdon. Jfriter. Dir., Prod. Mgr. 
Robert Rieske. Dir. of Photography 
Services: Exclusively 16mra industrial, scien- 
tific and educational films and high speed re- 
search photography; 16mm short subjects and 
spots for television. 

Facaijities: Sound stages, Maurer cameras, 
Stencil-Hoflnian magnetic recording system. J. 
A. Maurer optical recording system, mobile 
truck facilities for industrial coverage. 

RECEND PRODUCTIONS 
Motion Pictires: The Story oj Ohio Leather 
(The Ohio Leather Co.) : It's Your Totvn (Unit- 
ed Comnmnity Chest of Niagara Falls I series 
of 6; Applications oj Coaled Abrasives (The 
Carborundum Co.) : A !\'ew Development in the 
Art oj Segmental Notching (The V&O Press 
Co.): Management Conference (Sylvania Elec- 
tric Products. Inc.) : The Westinghouse Load-0- 
Matic Crane. Dynamometer Motor Tests (The 
Westinghouse Electric Corp.). 

RoQUEMORE Films 

Headquarters: 44 Mt. Vernon Blvd. 

Hamburg, N. Y. 

Phone FRontier 3876 

Studio: 42 Pearl Street. Buffalo 2, New York 

Phone MOhawk 3512 

Date of Organization: 1940 

Everett E. Roquemore, Director and Manager 

(Complete data on recent productions and 

sponsors not submitted. I 

Pennsylvania 

^^ ■¥ ■¥ 

DeFrenes Company 

1909-11 Buttonwood Street 

Philadelphia 30, Pennsylvania 

Phone: RIttenhouse 6-1686 

Date of Organization: 1916 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

Joseph DeFrenes. Executive Producer 

John E. DeFrenes. Associate Producer 

Leon S. Rhodes, Production Manager 

Francis Heininger & Stanley Smith, Directors 

C. Raymond Hockey. Editorial Chief 

Harry E. Ziegler, Jr.. Animation Director 

Michael Levanios, Jr., Director of Photography 

John C. Westing, Chief Sound Engineer 

Services: 16 & 35mm motion picture produc- 
tions from script to film: research, idea and 
script development, production, audience test- 
ing, distribution. Color, black-and-white: sound, 
silent; animation; filmagraphs, slidefilms; TV 
films and commercials. 

Facilities: 16 & 35mm cameras, recordin 
animation and editing equipment; studio includ 
ing 66x30x20 foot sound stage; lighting equip 
ment for studio and location; RCA sound sys 
tern including dubbers, tape recorder and mag- 



DeFrenes Company: continued 

nelic editing equipment for 35mm; 16 & 35mm 
interlock projection facilities: ^4 inch tape 
recording and re-recording; synchronous disc 
recorders: music library: film vault. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures : Milk As You Like It (Ab- 
botts Dairies) ; Symbol of Healing (Reading 
Hospital) ; Quality Castings for Industry (Tex- 
tile Machine Works) : Partners in Progress 
(North America Companies) ; The Key to Life 
(Bernadine Convent! : You're the Producer 
(R.C.A.) : The Delaware Story (Diamond State 
Telephone Co.) : Please Pass the Condensate 
(Yarnall-Waring Co.) : Equilibration of Occlu- 
sion (U.S. Navy). 

FiLMOCRAPH, Maintenanace and Repair of Steam 
Condensers, and other films for U.S. Navy; fihns 
for other government agencies and private com- 
panies: TV commercials. 



News Reel Laboratory 

1733 Sansom Street 

Philadelphia 3, Pa. 
Phone: RIttenliouse 6-3892 
Date of Organization: 1920 
Louis W. Kellman. Executive Head 
Services: Industrial, educational and docu- 
mentary films, television feature programs and 
commercials, slides and slidefilms in both black 
and white and color. Complete 16mm laboratory. 
Facilities: Studio with complete production 
equipment and sound recording. Recording de- 
partment consists of t^vo Maurer recorders; 
Maurer film phonographs: Fairchild disc re- 
corders. Col. Ranger's studio model Rangertone 
tape recorder and all the Maurer recording 
equipment including mixing amplifier. 16mm 
lab equipped to develop our black and white 
negative: 3 B&H printers with automatic light 
change boards: Depue reduction machine 35 to 
16 and 16 to 35 blowup; Have ordered an EDL 
16mm developing machine which is now in proc- 
ess of manufacture for developing new Eastman 
color. Cameras include: 16mm Mitchell, 35nmi 
standard B&H. 2 — 16mm Maurers, No. 12 Pro 
Auricon with single system sound: 20 Cine Spe- 
cials No. 2's with 40-200 foot film chambers and 
12-70-DA B&H. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Motion Pictures: Dark Interlude (Overbrook 
School for the Blind I : Tankers Away, Fire Con- 
trol in Petroleum Marketing, Sports Car Racing 
at Walkins Glen, Pro View of 1952, (Atlantic 
Refining Company I : Power for You, Pole Top 
Recessilalion ( Philadelphia Electric Co.) ; Short- 
cut to World Markets (Delaware River Port 
.Authoritv ) : Profile for Tomorrow I Scott Paper) . 

I'illsburgli 

♦ -K * 

The Jam Handy Organization 

The Jam Handy Org.ajmization, Inc., 930-932 

Penn Avenue, Pittsburgh 22, Penn. Phone: 

EXpress 1-1840. Mac Campbell in charge. 

(Complete listing under Detroit area) 



Mode-Art Pictures, Inc. 

1022 Forbes Street 

Pittsburgh 19, Pennsylvania 

Phones: Express 1-1846-47-48-49 

(Complete data received at press time and to 

appear in 1st Supplement) 



Newman-Schmidt Studios 

713 Penn Avenue 

Pittsburgh 22, Pa. 

Phone: GRant 1-5414 

Dale of Organization: 1937 

Irving J. Newman, Partner 

Herman W. Schmidt, Partner 

Services: Industrial motion pictures; television 
shorts and commercials: slidefilms and visual 
aids: still photography. 

Facilities: Cameras, studios, and location equip- 
ment for motion picture and still photography. 
Sound recording for motion pictures and slide- 
films. Custom designed slidefilm camera. Pro- 
cessing facilities for b&w and color still pho- 
tography and slidefilms. including patented color 
processor of own design. Limited 16mm pro- 
cessing facilities. Creative staff including script 
writers and artists. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Motion Pictures: The House That Jacks Built 
(Duff-Norton Manufacturing Co. I. 
Television: The Marty-Wolf son Sketchbook 
(TV series) ; TV commercials. Footage for films 
jointiv produced with other studios. 



Wilding Picture Productions, Inc. 

429 Fourth Avenue 

Room 1201 

Pittsburgh. Pennsylvania 

Phone; GRant 1-6240 

Ralph Maitland in charge. iLnder supervision of 
Jack Rheinstrom) 



John D. Hesselbein Studios 

236 Levergood St. 

Johnstown, Pa. 

Phone: 9-6310 

Date of Organization; 1947 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

John D. Hesselbein. President 

Frances R. Hesselbein, Sec, Treas. 

Albert N. Bailey, Sound Engineer 

Services: 16ram black-and-white and color 

sound films: location work; still photography; 

TV films and slides. 

Facilities: Studio, Bolex and Auricon 16mra 

cameras; synchronous tape recording; no 35mm 

equipment. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Motion Pictures: The Handwritten Word (Pa- 
per, Stationery & Tablet Mfrs. Assn.) ; Sewing 
at Bestform I Best form Foundations, Inc.) ; Sugar 
from Trees (self). 

(continued o.n following pace 72) 



70 



RUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



Which groove are you in? 



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Slide Film Record 




OLD 16" STANDARD GROOVE 

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No difference in playing lime — a vast difference in cost and q ualit y — 
Microgroove saves you up to 50% on the expense of processing, pressing, 
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COLUMBIA 
TRANSCRIPTIONS 

A DIVISION OF COLUMBIA RECORDS 

ORIGINATORS OF THE MICROGROOVE RECORD 

Trado-mark "Columbta" Rog. U. S- Pat. Off. Marcas ReQiatrsdan 



SEND THIS COUPON TODAY. 



Columbia Transcriptions 
799 Seventh Avenue 
New York 19, New York 

We're interested in saving money. Show us 
how. 

Name 



Company _ 
Address — 
City 



1953 PRODUCTION REVIEW 



MIRDLE ATLAIS'TIC: 

Washington, D. C. 

•X * * 

Byron, Incorporated 

1226 Wisconsin Avenue. N.W. 

Wasliin<:ton 7, D. C. 

Phone: DuPont 7-1800 

Date of Organization: 1938 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

Byron Roudabush, President 

Dudley Spruill. I ice President 

Alice E. Kloss, Treasurer 

Peter J. Agnew, Secretary 

Services: 16mni films for television and sales 
promotion: training films for U. S. Armed 
Forces and Government agencies; television com- 
mercials. 

Faciuties: Studio and laboratory with sound 
stage, magnetic and negative-positive recording 
and dubbing: color printing; art and animation 
departments, script writers, complete studio fa- 
cilities. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Motion Pictires: Washington Spotlight (Mil- 
ton Hammer) : March of Dimes — Interruption to 
Life (National Foundation for Infantile Paraly- 
sis): The Windou (Community Chest): Crip- 
pled Children ( D. C. Society for Crippled Chil- 
dren! : For Survival (Federal Civil Defense Ad- 
ministration I : Emergency Action to Save Lives 
( FCDA) ; Industrial Health and Safety-Breathe 
and Live (U.S. .Navv) : Cricothyroidotomy (U.S. 
Navy). 
Television: Fealurettes and 



The Jam Handy Organization 

The Jam Handy Organization, Inc., 544 
Transportation Building, Washington 6, D.C. 
Phone: District 0611. Harry Watts, in charge. 
(Complete listing under Detroit, Mich.) 



SOUTHEAST 



(Georgia, Kentucky. Louisiana. Tennessee I 
Georgia 

* -K -K 

Beeland-King Film Productions 

732 Spring Street, N.W. 

Atlanta, Georgia 

Phone: Elgin 7558 

Date of Organization: 1952 

( an expansion of Charles D. Beeland Co., 
established in 1938 1 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

C D. Beeland. Partner & Production Mgr. 

R. W. King. Partner & Sales Manager 

Elmo Ellis and R. E. Ricketts. Writers 

Paul B. Smith. Film Editor 

L. E. McCumber. Director of Photography 

Elizabeth Beeland. Make-up 

E. C. Bangs. Electrical Supervisor 

P. C. Bangs, Sound Engineer 
Clement E. Fowler. Art Director 



Beptand-King Film Productions: continued 
Services: Motion pictures on sales promotion 
and training, public and civic relations: theatri- 
cal and television short subjects, animation. 
Facilities: 16mm and 35mm cameras: light- 
ing; magnetic film, optical film and disc record- 
ing: aerial motion picture photography; creative 
staff, title department, editing and cutting rooms; 
narration, music, and animation department. 
RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Motion Pictures: For Progress . . . Call Dixie 
(Southern Bell Telephone & Telegraph Co.); 
Georgia Crusade Against Cancer (American 
Cancer Society ( : What s Your Trouble? (Series 
of 13 15-minute programs for the Nat'l. Council 
of Churches! : Power of the South (The South- 
ern Company): and Opportunity America (Jef- 
ferson Mills!. Other (Current Titles: Daughter 
of the Stars (Shenandoah Valley. Inc.) ; Hospi- 
tality Unlimited (Hotel Roanoke) : Forecast — 
Continued Prosperity (Southwestern Gas & Elec. 
Co.) ; Frontiers Unlimited (Central & South West 
Corporation): Audograph Soundwriting (Gray 
Manufacturing Co.) 

TV Commercials: Fleetwood Coffee: Bailey 
Supreme Coffee: Columbia Baking; Lay's Potato 
Chips: Brock Candy; Norris Candy; Gordy 
Tire: Tonv Dog Food; Lymburger Nurseries; 
Delta Air Lines: Clo-Wliite Bleach. 



Kentucky 

Kent Lane. Inc. 

Louisville, Kentucky 

Phone: Jackson 3037 

Date of Organization: April, 1947 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

Kent Lane. President and Producer 

Harry Hicks, Vice President 

Julia Lane. Treasurer 

Howard Hunt. Secretary 

Jdcquelyn Clark. Ass't to President 

and Ass't Producer 

Grover Page. Jr.. Art Director 

Tom Mulvey, Director of Photography 

Services: 16mm & 35mm motion pictures in 
sound and color: b&w; sound slidefilms: TV 
commercials. 

Facilities: Maurer or Mitchell cameras; crea- 
tive staff: sound stage; animation dept.; sound 
recording and editing facilities. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Motion Pictures: The Finest Product (Louis- 
ville Bd. of Education) ; Rivers to Cross (State 
of Kentucky): Make Mine Green (Green Pas- 
tures Comm.): More Per Mile (State of Ken- 
tuckv): Puppet Show (General Electric Co.). 



Louisiana 

Commerce Pictures 

525-527 Poydras Street, P.O. Box 152 

New Orleans, Louisiana 

Phone: MAgnolia 5026 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

Robert Wiegand, President 



Comnirrcf Pii-ttirr 



■itinni'd 



Services: .Short length advertising motion pic- 
tures; 35mm and 16mm one and two-reel pub- 
licity and public relations motion pictures: 15 
and .30 min. TV films. 

Facilities: Silent and sound studio: cutting 
room; laboratory; 35 & 16mm sound-on-film 
recording; ample lights for night locations and 
interiors. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Motion Pictures: Summer Comfort (Corona 
Auto Electric Co.) : School of Music (Grune- 
»ald"s): This Could Happen to Your House 
(Custom Forging. Inc.! Brighter & Whiter ( F. 
Uddo & Sons!: and Fashions in Furs ( Luliritz 
Furs). 

Tennessee 

•f * -»■ 

Sam Orleans and Associates, Inc. 

211 W. Cumberland Avenue 

Knoxville 15, Tennessee 

Phones: 3-8098 and 4-1301 

Date of Organization: 1946 

Branch: 116 N.W. ( Room 204 ! 

Oklahoma City, Okla. 

Sam P. Orleans. Executive Producer 

Lawrence Mollot. Associate Producer 

Services: Motion pictures for industry and 
the Armed Forces; public relations and training 
films; surgical and medicine films; television. 
Facilities: Own studios with complete produc- 
tion equipment: cutting rooms; portable synchro- 
nous tape recorder. Projection and recording 
room. Transportation equipment. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Motion Pictures: The Common Heritage (State 
of Tennessee ! : School Health In Action ( State 
of Oklahoma! : Johnsville Steam Plant (Tennes- 
see Valley Authority): Mitral Stenosis Opera- 
tion ( Dr. W. K. Sivann ) ; The Man Behind the 
Gun ( The DeVillibiss Co. ) : I'our Health Depart- 
ment in Action (City of Knoxville! : A General 
Series ( Atomic Energy Connnission I . 

FoTovox. Inc. 

286 Monroe Avenue 

Memphis. Tennessee 

Phone: 37-3371 

Date of Organization: 19.50 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

W. B. Campbell. President 

L. B. Abernathy, Director of Photography 

R. E. Rogers. Production Sui>ervisor 
H. H. Highfill. Jr.. Animation Director 

Services: Sound-on-film 16mm production of 
documentary, training, commercial and televi- 
sion films (including animation!. 
F\cilities: Sound stage: recording studio; 
Mitchell camera equipment: completely integrat- 
ed production facilities (less laboratory). 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
.VIoTiON Pictures: Selling the Siszle (DuMont) ; 
Announcement Meeting ( Buick Motors, Southern 
Division). 

Television: Juniper Junction, U.S.A. (series 
of 26 .30-minute programs for Amer. Snuff Co.) 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 




Peerless 
Services 
Include: 



Peerless Protective and 

Preservative Film 

Treatments 

Release Prinfs. Troilers, 

Television Commercials 

Prints W Continuous Projection 

Negotives. Masters, Orlglnols, 

Filmstrips, Transparency Slides, 

Microfilm 

Film Rejuvenation 
Treatments 

Shrinkoge Reduction 

Scratch Removol 

Rehumidlficotion 

Cleaning ond Repairs 

Film Library Servicing 

Shipments, Inspection. 

Cleaning, Repairs, Cuttlng-ln and 

emovol of Commercials. Inventory 

and Booking Records. Storage 

Film Distribution Servicing 

Storage pending orders. 

Inventory Records. 

Shipments to Purchasers 

Filmstrip Packoging 

Breakdown of rolls into strips, 

Packaging in cons. Labeling, 

Boxing of Sets, Storage 

pending orders. Shipments 



A Message of interest to: 



Motion Picture Producers, 
Distributors, Advertising Agencies, 
Sponsors, Film Librariesr 
TV Film Producers and Distributors . 



.>«^ 

<, 



Peerless Film Processing Corporation does not produce. 

distribute, sponsor or exhibit films. 

Peerless is a SERVICE organization — pioneer in the field of treating 

film — serving thousands of organizations from coast to coast . . . 

directly and through licensees. 

* * * 

Without exception, ALL film should be treated if you are to get maximum 

results in terms of' good projection and number of showings. Without 

treatment, your film — from initial release to the last booking - — 

is much more susceptible to damage. And damaged film can result in 

an indifferent audience. 

Peerless Treatment is the finishing touch and the least expensive item 

in the whole process of picture-making. Yet it safeguards millions of dollars 

invested in finished prints. 

Peerless Treatment assures: seasoned, toughened, smoothly projecting 

prints. Peerless-treated prints start off right and keep in good condition 

longer. So when you order prints, don't forget to include 
"PEERLESS TREATMENT" in every purchase order. 

* * * 

For information on common causes of Preventable Damage 

to films and how Peerless Treatment guards against 

such damage, write for new brochure, "PEERLESS POINTERS" 

Address Peerless Audio-Visual Department 




JEERLESS 

FILM PROCESSING CORPORATION 

165 WEST 46th STREET, NEW YORK 36, NEW YORK 
959 SEWARD STREET, HOLLYWOOD 38, CALIF. 



1 ') S 3 PRODUCTION REVIEW 



iS- *f c^ u^ 4f en 



EAST CE.\TRAL 



I Iniliana. Oliio ami Miclii^aiii 
Indiana 

Galbreath Picture Productions, Inc. 

2905 Fairfield Avenue 

Fort Wayne, Indiana 

Phono: Harrison 4147-8 

Date of Organization: 1942 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

Richard E. Galbreath, President 

Sam W. Fletcher, (ice President 

Ralph L. .Shirmevej. Secretary 

Tom Berry, Treasurer 

David C. Wilkinson, Business Manager 

John W. Watson. Sales Manager 

Guy P. Fitzsinmions. Editing Chief 

William Swander, Production Chief 

Services: Public relations, sales and industrial 
training motion pictures; sound slidefilms; still 
illustrations; custom and package television pro- 
grams and commercials. 

Facilities: Color, camera and lighting equip- 
ment; synchronous sound and re-recording 
equipment: sound stage; laboratory; editing 
and projection rooms; music library; carpenter 
shop: executive offices. Permanent creative staff. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
MOTIOX PiCTlRES: \ews at Home: Dear Mr. 
Editor (National Homes Corp.) : North America 
Moves Ahead CNorth American Van Lines) ; 
Here's How: Package Preview. Guaranteed Fair 
Weather ( Westinghouse Radio Stations. Inc. 1. 
Also package film productions for television. 

Clahence H. Gutermuth 

4407 Drurj- Lane 

Fort Wayne 6, Indiana 

(Data on recent activity not submitted) 

NoRKis Smitley Productions 

Stellhorn Road. Route No. 9 

Fort Wayne, Indiana 

(Data on recent activitv not submitted) 



OHIO 

Akron 

* * * 

Caravel Films. Inc. 
Caravel Films, Inc. Address Visual Methods, 
Inc., 336 Second National Building, Akron, 
Ohio. Ernest Nathan, vice-president, in charge. 
(Complete listing under New York City) 

National Film Productions 

955 Diana Avenue 

Akron, Ohio 

Phone: JE 8354 

OFnCERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

H. C. Kunklcman, President, Treas. 

William Kuntz, Vice President, Secty. 

Services: Civic and industrial films. 

Facilities: Arriflex 35mm, Bell & Howell 16mm, 



National Film Productions: continued 

Auricon Special, Bolex cameras; DePue printers. 

RECENT PRODI CTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Motion Pictires: The Scio Story (Scio Pot- 
tery Co.) ; Fun In the Sun; This Is Your Totvn; 
Just Little Things (safety film). Sponsor names 
oniiltcl. 

Bert Johnston Productions, Inc. 

8204 Blue Ash Road 

Cincinnati 36, Ohio 

Phone : SYcamore 6400 

Date of Organization: 1944 

(recently acquired by new interests) 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

James B. Hill, General Manager & Director 

Mary J. Renn. Production Coordinator 

Jack R. Rabius. Technical Director 

Peg Bolger, Script 

Services: Industrial, civic, educational, and 

television films; slidefihns; animation. 

Facilities: Sound studio; 16mm Maurer & 

Cine Special cameras; 16nun magnetic tape 

sound recording; disc recording; animation 

stand. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Motion Pictures: Dollars at the Door (Sani- 
tone Div. Emery Industries) : Big Enough to 
Care (Western & Southern Life Insurance Co.) 
Appointment With Tomorroic: You Can Be A 
Winner, Too; More for You (Kroger Co.) ; This 
Is Oar City I (Citizen's Dexelopment Committee) . 



Wilding Picture Productions 

Wilding Picture Productions, Inc., Enquirer 
Building, Cincinnati, Ohio. Phone: GArfield 
1)477. R. L. McMillan, in charge. Under su- 
jiervision of Jack Rheinslrom. 
(Complete listing under Chicago, Illinois) 

Cleveland 

CiNECRAFT Productions, Inc. 

2515 Franklin Avenue 

Cleveland 13, Ohio 

Phone: SUperior 1-2300 

Date of Organization: 1939 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

Ray Culley, President 

Robert E. Haviland. M. P. Producer 

Frank Siedel, Scripts 

Elton Fletcher, Slidefilm Producer 

Robert Welchans, Director 

Harry Horrocks, Chief Cameraman 

Paul Culley, Chief Sound Engineer 

Robert Mowry, An Director 

Ed Perry, Stills and Animation 

Charles Toth, Stage Director 

Christine Hofstetter, Office Manager 

Services: Industrial sales and job training mo- 
tion pictures and slidefilms; civic relations films. 

Facilities: Pioneer in 3-camera technique with 
own Cinescope for synchronized sound in color 
and black and white; sound stage, Mitchell cam- 
eras and RCA Sound System; floating studios 



Cinecraft Productions: continued 
for recording: still and animation departments; 
art an<l creative staffs. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
-Motion Pictures: Fasteners for Progress (Tin- 
ncrman Products, Inc.) Uncle Ray Finds the 
Way (Harry Ferguson. Inc.) Decision to Ex- 
pand ( Republic Steel) ; Telephone Tactics; At 
Your Service; This Is Your Business (Westing- 
house Electric). 

Sou.ND Slidefilms: Westinghouse Products 
( four subjects for Westinghouse Electric) 
Aluminum Living and Progress in Literature & 
Inquiries (.Muminum Co. of America); Home 
Cooking ( Kroger Grocery Stores) ; 20 subjects 
for General Tire & Rubber Co.; 7 subjects for 
The Pennzoil Co. 

TV CoMMERCHLs: Burkhardt Brewing Corp.; 
Leisy Brewing Co.; Interchcmical Corp.; Nu- 
Age Products; Standard Oil of Ohio; Republic 
Steel: Central National Bank: Apex Electrical 
Mfg. Co.: Ohio Development & Publicity 
Comm.: Pepsi-Cola: F. C. Russell Co.; Eljer 
Co.; Alliance Mfg. Co.: Gray's Drug. 



EscAR Motion Picture Service 
7315 Carnegie Avenue 

Cleveland 3, Ohio 
Phone: Endicott 1-2707 
Date of Organization: 1912 
OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 
Ernest S. Carpenter. President 
E. P. Carpenter. Secy. -Treasurer 
Lester Wliitney. Laboratory Manager 
A. L. Cope. Editorial Director 
George Murphy, Lab. Tech. 
Pat Bellitt, Cameraman 
Peg Bowman. Script Dept.: Charles Hale. Maint. 
H. B. Armstrong. Service Mgr. 
Robert Beasley, Sales 
Charles O'Donnel, Sound Engineer 
Virginia Carpenter. Office Mgr. 
Services: 16nim and 35mm motion pictures, 
slidefilms. b&w or color. TV production depart- 
ment for special service. Commercial Koda- 
chrome specialty; animation. 
Facilities: Sound studio with full equipment 
for all types photography, including lip-synch 
on both 16mm and 35nim. 16mm and 35mm film 
recorders; professional tape recorder provides 
immediate playback. Re-recording from 16mm or 
35nim film, tape or disc. Pro. 16mm and 35mm 
cameras: Mole-Richardson lighting. Air-condi- 
tioned laboratory for 16mm and 35mm proc- 
essing: Bell & Howell printers: optical printing 
35mm to 16nuu and 16mm to 16mm. picture and 
sound. Color printing. 16mm and 35mm lacquer 
coating. Sensitometrical quality control, cinex 
machines for 35mm and 16nim. Complete edit- 
ing department: animation and slidefilm depart- 
ments. Air-conditioned screening room. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: The Winner (color, lip- 
synch I (Cleveland Range Co.) The Steering 
Pusher (White Motor Co. I : The Green Stem 
(Greenhouse Vegetable Packing Assn.); Musky 
Fever (Carling Brewing); Tress Curler 
(Mitchell Products). 



74 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



Motion Picture Productions, Inc. 

Rockefeller Building 

Sixth and Superior Streets, West 

Cleveland 13, Ohio 

Phone: PRospect 14900 

Date of Organization: 1932 

Incorporation: 1941 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

Donald C. Jones, President 

James H. Rand, III. Vice President 

Claude \. Rakestraw, Vice President 

Clay H. Hollister, Dir. Marketing Research 

M. C. Jones. Secretary 

Andrew S. Mulwick., Treasurer 

Services: Industrial, public, labor and civic re- 
lations motion pictures; sales training, television. 

Facilities: Mitchell, Bell & Howell, Eymo and 
Akeley SSnun cameras, Cine-Special 16mm 
cameras; sound stage, 60 lights; R.C.A. SSnam 
sound recorder, 33' 3 and 78 R.P.M. scoring 
turntables, van-type truck for location; two Bell 
& Howell hot splicing tables, two 35mm Movi- 
olas and 16mm viewer, s}'nchronizers, two 35mm 
carbon arc projectors and 16mm projectors; 
processing laboratory, automatic 35mm and 
16mm developer and drying cabinet; art depart- 
ment; music and sound effects library; creative. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Motion Pictires: Champions Alt (Firestone 
Tire & Rubber Co.) : Men, Money & Madness 
(Citizens Committee for Good Government) ; 
Poletop Rescue (Edison Electric Institute) ; 
First Five i ear Report I National Foundry Edu- 
cational Foundation) : Sajety's Supreme Cham- 
pion (Firestone). 



Productions On Film, Inc. 

1515 Euclid Avenue 

Cleveland 15. Ohio 

Phone: SUperior 1-9829 

Date of Organization; 1952 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 
Robert Fleming Blair. President 
Murphy McHenry, Vice President. Production 
William C. Blair. Secretary 
Robert R. Carroll. Director of Photography 
Kenneth Hamann. Chief Sound Engineer 
"Cappy" Voleau, Research Director 
Charles L. Sallee, Art Director 
Services: Creation and production of sound 
motion pictures, television programs and com- 
mercial films of all types, including slideiilms 
and Visualcast presentations. 
F.4C1LITIES: Maurer camera and sound recorder; 
16mm live recording and re-recording from tape 
or disc: large sound stage; lighting equipment; 
editing, art, research, writing: still and anima- 
tion departments: projection room. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
(New company, organized in l'AS2l 



Stars Indicate Producer Advertising 

■<f Small bold-face stars appearing over many 
producer listings in this issue indicate advertise- 
ments accepted for publication from reputable 
and established firms in this specialized field. 



rieveland, Ohio 



Wilding Picture Productions 

Wilding Picture Productions, Inc., 1010 
Euclid. Cleveland, Ohio. Phone: TOwer 
1-6440. Jack Rheinstrom, Vice President. 
(Complete listing under Chicago, Illinois) 



llavton 



The Jam Handy Organization 
The Jam Handy Organiz.4.tion, Inc., 310 Tal- 
bott Building, Dayton 2, Ohio. Phone: ADams 
6289. A. M. Simpson, in charge. 
(Complete listing under Detroit, Mich.) 



Haig and Patterson, Inc. 

131 North Ludlow Street 

Dayton 2, Ohio 

Phone: ADams 9321 

Date of Organization: 1939 

Studio: 15 East Bethune, Detroit 2, Michigan. 

Phone: TRinity 3-0283. 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

J. T. Patterson, President 

Earl E. Seielstad, Executive Vice President 

C. W. Hiuz, Secretary 

Services: Industrial sound slidefihns. motion 
pictures, meeting guides, instruction manuals 
and lecture charts. 

Facilities: Complete film studio located at De- 
troit address, permanently staffed with writers, 
artists and technicians. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Motion Pictures: The Cornerstone of Confi- 
dence and The Key to Quality Workmanship 
(Cadillac Division of General Motors Corp.) ; 
Your Future is Automatic (Proctor and Gamble 
Company) : Making Charge Business Pay and 
Controlled Credit (National Cash Register Com- 
pany) ; What a Salesman Should Knoiv About 
Plywood — series (Douglas Fir Plywood Asso- 
ciation) ; Made for the Earth (Price Brothers 
Co.) : Neic Horizons with the Aero-Willys (Wil- 
lys-Overland Motor Company). 



Detroit, >Iiciiigaii 

* ■•< -tt 

Florez Incorporated 

(formerly Visual Training Corporation) 

815 Bates Street 

Detroit 26, Michigan 

Phone: \^ O 24920 

Date of Organization: 1931 

officers and DEPARTMENT HEADS 

Genaro A. Florez, President 

Hans A. Erne, Executive Vice President 

Paul Kelcourse, Secretary-Treasurer, Gen. Mgr. 



Florez Inrorporalcd: continued 

J. Raymond Cooper, Gen. Prod. Mgr. 

John K. Kleene, Editorial Director 

Ray B. Helser, Dir. Specialty Services 

Stanley W. Williamson, Dir. Training Division 

James F. Jackson, Dir. Military Training Div. 

Services: Consultants, creators, producers for 
sales and service training, promotion and man- 
agement; product presentation; conventions and 
exhibits; employe and consumer relations; eco- 
nomics information. Planning and producing 
slidefihns, motion pictures, transparencies, Video- 
graph presentations, charts, recordings, modeb 
and exhibits, stage presentations, conventions, 
manuals, texts, questionnaires, house organs. 
Offering stock shots, a-v equipment, syndications. 

Facilities: Equipment and personnel for re- 
search, copy, art, photography (stills and 16mni 
or 35mm motion), animation, color duping, 
typesetting, printing. 

RECENT productions AND SPONSORS 

Reference Data: Tune Up For Close Harmony, 
Trout Fly Fable. Selling by Presentation. Selling 
by Demonstration (Nash Motors) : Let's Get 
Acquainted. The Standout Picture (Motorola, 
Inc.). 

Note: During 1952 a total of 1207 customers 
utilized production services, with 134 of them 
relying on tailor-made presentations with con- 
fidential specifications. Leading trade classifica- 
tion of such presentations found 47 for automo- 
tive. 17 for petroleum. 15 for automotive parts. 
12 for advertising agencies. 11 for the .\rmed 
Forces. 9 for Radio and TV manufacturers, and 
7 for pharmaceuticals. 

Henning and Cheadle, Inc. 

1060 W. Fort Street 

Detroit 26, Michigan 

Phone: WOodward 1-7688 

Branches: 15 E. 60th Street. New York. N. Y. 
Phone: TEJnpleton 8-8288. Charles Behymer, 
branch manager. 1140 So. Michigan Avenue, 
Chicago, Illinois. Phone: WAbash 2-0570. F. E. 
Harrold, branch manager. Complete photo- 
graphic production, editorial and distribution 
services in each branch office. 

officers and department heads 

L. A. Henning. President 
George R. Cheadle, Vice President 

Services: Visualcast presentations; sound slide- 
films; motion pictures, literature; complete pro- 
grams. 

Facilities: Equipment and staff for black and 
while. Ektachrome and color separation, includ- 
ing studio, cameras, lighting, etc. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Sound Slidkhlms: She \eeds a Hamilton 
(Hamilton Mfg. (^1.) ; Open Door on the Home 
Front (Ironrite Co.) : Sine Keys to Truck Sell- 
ing (Ford Motor Co.) : Installing Kex Service 
(Kex National .Association) ; Story of Your In- 
dustrial Distributor (McGraw Hill). 
.Motion Picture: Presenting the .Veii' Kaiser 
(Kaiser Frazier Corporation). 
Visualcast: presentations for Reo, General 
Electric, Mfg. Light & Heat Co. of Pittsburgh. 

( DETROIT listings CONTINUE ON NEXT PACE) 



1953 PRODUCTION REVIEW 



75 



EAST CENTRAL 



Hotroit. .>li4'liif<2iii: 4M»nl*<l 



The Jam Handy Organization. Inc. 

2821 East Grand Boulevard 

Detroit 11. Michigan 

Phone: TRinity 5-2450 

Date of Organization: 1917 

Branches: New York: 1775 Broadway, New 
York 19. N.Y. Phone: JUdson 2-4060. Her- 
man Goelz, in charge. Chicago; 230 N. Michi- 
gan Avenue. Chicago 1. Illinois. Phone: STate 
2-6757. Jess (Jreenlief. in charge. V^ashing- 
ton: 17.S0 H. StreeU N.W., Washington 6, D.C. 
Phone: District 0611. Harrv Walts, in charge. 
Dayton: ,310 Talbott Building. Davton 2. Ohio. 
Phone: ADams 6289. A. M. Simpson, in charge. 
Los Angeles: 7046 Hollywood Boulevard. Los 
Angeles 28. California. Phone: HEmpstead 
5809. (Service office, not sales.) Pittsburgh: 
930-932 Penn Avenue, Pittsburgh 22, Pennsyl- 
vania. Phone: EXpress 1-1840. Mac Campbell, 
in charge. 

OmCERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

Jamison Handy, President 

Oliver Horn. Executive Vice President 

John A. Campbell. / . P. (Training Devices) 

Everett Schafer. /. P. iServite Development ) 

George B. Finch. \ . P. (Sales Development) 

William G. Luther. 1./'. (Automotive Contacts) 

.\very W. Kinney. Secretary 

Allan E. Gedelman, Treasurer 

Anne Jioffre, Director, Public Impressions 

Services: Motion pictures: commercial; indus- 
trial; sales training; customer, personnel and 
public relations; minute movies, three-minute 
screen advertisements, sponsored shorts, safety, 
educational, health films; television commercials. 
Slidefilms: Commercial, industrial, sales and 
shop training, customer and public relations, 
merchandising, record, cartoon, reading, chart, 
discussional, quiz, school study and health, 
safety, first aid. Glass slides, transparencies, 
slide racks, opaque materials. 
Facilities: Complete studio. Sound stage, re- 
cording, set construction, direction, casting, 
scene design, mock ups, miniatures, stage man- 
agement, field reconnaisance, animation studios, 
music direction and orchestra, rear projection. 
prop department, speech and acting coaching, 
slidefilm studio, film processing laboratories, art 
department, location equipment, creative staff. 
Projection sales and service. Special devices: 
Suitcase projectors. Shopper Stoppers, continu- 
ous loop projection, projectors, synthetic train- 
ing devices. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Motion Pictures: Iron Country — Iron Ore ami 
Minnesota's Future (Lake Superior Industrial 
Bureau); GranAma Goes to School (Frigi- 
daire) ; Something More Than Steel (Heppen- 
stall Co.) : A Young Man's Fancy CEdison Elec- 
tric Institute) : Permanent Investment fCast 
Iron Soil Pipe Institute) : fThy Doesn't Some- 
body Sell Me (The Coca-Cola Company) : Tryp- 



tar (Armour Laboratories, Inc.); Lightweight 
Champion (Zonolite Co.) : Belter Fencing (Kop- 
pers Co.): Crusaders Against Fire (Natiiinal 
Autoniatir .Sprinkler & Fire (Control Assn. I : 
/■acts About Taps and Tapping I Greenfield Tap 
& Die Corp, I Protecting Poultry Products 
I Merck & Company, Inc.); Mother Takes a 
Holiday (Wliirpool Corp.) ; Octupus in the 
House (National Electric Products Corp. 1 ; The 
V>» Ford Tractor (Dearborn Motors Corpora- 
lion I : On the Button (Union Switch & Signal 
Div. Westinghouse Wv Brake Co.) : For a 
Richer Cnlhnlir Life (Catholic Archdiocese of 
Detroit). 

SoiM) Sl.lOKKILMS. Live Shows. Visual Presen- 
tations. TV Commercials and other materials 
for national clientele during 1952. 



K.LINC Studios. Lnc. 
Klinc Studios, Inc., 1928 Guardian Building, 
Detroit, Mich. Stanley Jack. 

(Complete listing under Chicago, 111.) 

MovicoN Motion Pictires 

2148 Gratiot 

Detroit. Michigan 

Phone: WOodward 1-9111 

Date of Organization: 1945 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

Michael de Martino. Owner and Producer 

Joel Nash. Production Manager 

Douglas Wright. Editorial 

IVino ITierti. Sound Director 

Tommy Thompson. Art Director 

Services: Provide photographic and editorial 
services including film editing through all 
stages. Will supply any individual service on 
contract basis or will contract for entire pro- 
duction. 

Facilities: Mitchell. Arriflex. Evemo. Filmo 
Model H. Cine-Kodak Special and Bell & Howell 
35mm cameras. Mitchell 16mm camera. Anima- 
tion stand for 35mm and 16mm. Auricon 16mm 
single system for newsreel pickup. Ampex tape 
magnetic recorder with s\tic signal generator. 
stancil-Hoffman playback units with custom 
mixing channel. 

RECENT PRODICTIONS AND SPONSORS 
.Motion Pictures: Designs for Better Living 
( Briggs Manufacturing Company. Beautyware 
Division) : Through the Ages (Permastone 
Company) : Onflow — Shock Absorber (Chrys- 
ler Corporation!: Leagued Together (Ameri- 
can Lutheran Church) : Tube of Tomorrow 
(Calumet and Heda. Inc.). 



Rocket Pictures. I.nc. 

Rocket Pictures, Inc., 5809 Harvard Road, 
Detroit, Mich, Phone: TUxedo 2-7762, 
George Netschke, 
(Complete listing under Los Angeles area) 

■""''* Bold face stars over listing indicates dis- 
play advertising appearing in this issue. 



Ross Roy, Inc. 

2751 E, Jefferson Avenue 
Detroit 7, Michigan 
Date of Organization: 1929 
Branch KS: Ross Roy. Inc.. Hollywood 28, Cal. 
Ross Roy. Inc.. .307 No. Michigan Avenue. Chi- 
cago 1. Illinois, Ross Roy, Inc.. 122 E. 42nd 
Street. New York 12, N. Y, 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

Ross Roy, President 

Thomas G, McCormick. Executive 

Vice President & General Manager 

John W. Hutton. Vice PresiilenI 

and Operations Manager 

Carroll F. Sullivan, Vice President 

Wm. W. Shaul, Vice President 

John L. Thornhill. Vice President 

Robert A. Dearth. Vice President 

Mark Martin. Vice President — Chicago 

John G. Fogarty. Vi-ce President — Chicago 

William M. Ziegler, Jr.. 

Vice President — New York 

Maurice G. Vaughn. Vice President — Hollytuood 

F.rwin H. Haass, Secy.; Lathrop P. Morse, Treas. 

Lathrop P. Morse. Treasurer 

J. F. Bernard. Photographic Director 

J. A. Roche, Recording Director 

J. P, Brenner, Purchasing Agent 

Services: Creation and production of service, 
sales, and product sound slidefilm programs: 
more than 200.000 sets of films and records a 
year to the entire Chrysler Corporation dealer 
organization. Likewise produce sales, service, 
and product training sound slidefilms for The 
Texas Company and Air Conditioning Division 
of Servel. Inc. 

Facilities: Photographic studio and depart- 
ment, art, animation, recording director and 
staff, and creative copy personnel. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Sound Slidefilms: Activity Means Business, 
Your Job at Highland Park, Welcome to Chrys- 
ler (Chrysler Corporation): The Dodge Story, 
Slepping-up to Dodge, (Dodge Division); 
More Power to You in '52. A Word of Welcome 
( De Soto Division): Servicing Tips, Brass 
Tacks. Balanced Engineering, Quality Vp-Come- 
hacks Doivn (Plymouth Division): Automatic 
Overdrive (Chrysler Corp. of Canada. Ltd.); 
Profits from Batteries and Auto Supplies (The 
Texas Company) Hotv to Beat Competition (Air 
Condition Division, Servel. Inc. I . 



Wilding Picture Productions, Inc. 

Wilding Picture Productions, Inc, 1000 Dime 
Building, Detroit, Michigan. Phone: WOod- 
ward 3-9311. Lang S. Thompson. Vice Presi- 
dent. ( See complete listing under Chicago. ) 
(Studio and sales office facilities maintained). 



Raphael (;, W olff Studios 

Detroit representative: Harold R. Troy 

16852 Meyers Road, Detroit 35 

Phone: Diamond 1-06.54 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



Miehlga 



DoANE Productions 

514 Division Sln-et 

K;i<t Lansing, Mirli. 

I'honc 85714 

Pair .>f In.or|.oralion: 1948 

Don Doane, Producer 

Services: Sales promotion and public relations 
with 16mni sound and color iiiotion picture!- 
only: professional service from script to screen. 
Facilities: 16mm Cine Special and synchron- 
ous camera facilities; studio; synchronous port- 
able magnetic film recording; Maurer optical 



recording; portable lighting equipment with 
variable transformers for accurate color con- 
trol; editing: color work, printing: interlocic 
projection. 

RECENT I'RODICTIONS AM) SHON.><OR.s 
Motion Pictikes: The Servire Is Personal 
( Midi. Kducation Assoc. I ; The Kifihl Semen 
Produces the Ri^hl Calj (Mich. Artificial Breed- 
ers Coop.. Mich. Stale College I : Your Future 
Is a hal You Make It (Mich. Assoc, of Osteo- 
pathic I'luslcians and Surgeons. Inc.): Livinp 
under the Law (State Bar of Mich.i: The 
Ueakest Link (Mich. Inler-Iiuliistr\ Highway 
Safety Committee). 



jfcniH-Af □.iB-Afcn 



METROPOLITAN^ ITIICAGO AREA 



Atlas Film CoRPouATioru 

1111 South Boulevard 

Oak Park, Illinois 

Phone: AUstin 7-8620, EUclid 6-3100 

Date of Organization: 1913 

Branch (Sales) : 228 No. LaSalle St., Chicago 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

L. P. Mominee. I ice Pres., Secly., Gen. Mgr. 

Albert S. Bradish. J ice President, Production 

Frederick K. Barber. I'.P., Dir. of Adv. and 

Sales Prom. 

Edward Schager, I .P.. Dir. of Sales 

Norman C. Lindquist, I'.P., Dir. of TV 

James .\. Cuca. Slideftlm Dept. 

Services: 16nim and 35mm public relations and 
training motion pictures and slidelibns; color 
and sound: t.v. commercials: short subjects. 

Facilities: Cameras. 16nim and 35nim R.C.A. 
I6miii direct positive and .SSiiiiii sound record- 
ing: art department: time-lapse photography; 
two sound stages: laboratory: animation: edit- 
ing: creative staff. 

RECENT PRODLCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Motion Pkti res: She Stole the Shoic. Miracle 
oj the Kainhou ( Hotpoint. Inc.); Classified 
training motion pictures (I. S. Air (^)rps and 
r. S. Army I ; Belly's Fruit Groves ij. I. Case- 
Co.) ; Phonevision (Zenith Radio (^orp. I : Gallon 
Makes the Grade (Galion Iron Works & Mfg. 
Co. I ; Emulsions Gel a Break ( Black. Sivalls & 
Brvson » : Three R's of Bendinjc ( Wallace Sup- 
plies Mfg. Co.) ; Leatl from Mine to Metal (St. 
Joseph Lead Company ) . Theatre trailers for 
J. I. Case & National Safety Council. 

Soi/ND SlidefiL-Ms: The Aniana Plan (Amana 
Refrigeration ) ; Dollars Through Demonslra- 
tioiis I J. I. Cas«- Co. I ; 7"/ie Lady .Said .\n ( May- 
tag Company): Warfarin (\\iscoii>in .Muinni 
Research Foundation): Installing \etv Rings in 
Tired Diesels (Perfect Circle Ciimpanv) : Train- 
ing series on Centrifugal Pumps and Training 
series on Texrope Thc-licll Drive ( Allis-Chal- 
mers); A Bright Step Into tlw Future iMisha- 
waka Rubber 1; Sell the Whole Wide World 
(Zenith Radio Corp. i . 

TV CoMMKRClAli kor: Sears. Roebuck & Co.. 
Sunbeam. Phillips 66. .Studebaker, Greyhound, 



\an Merrilt Beer. Swift & Company. Chase Caii- 
dv. Manor House Coffee. Belle Sharmecr Hose, 
Whirlpool Washers. Miller Beer. ABC-O-Matic 
Washers. Arvin Industries. Bobbins & Myers. 
.•Vnco Windshield Wipers. Fall City Beer. Pure 
Oil Co.. Buchen Company. Kitchen Maid Corp., 
Caike C.ro. 



Beri.f.t Anderson Marlin, Inc. 
549 W. Randolph Street 

Chicago 6. Illinois 

Phone: AXdover 3-1027 

Date of Organization: 1929 

UFKKERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

Stanley R. Anderson, President 

Joseph P. Mariin, V.P. C. Everett Sward, V.P. 

James Bannister, V.P., Prod. 

Services: Production of training slidefilms and 
accompanying materials: dealer and sales, per- 
sonnel, job training: public, industrial and per- 
sonnel relations: product infurmalioii: analysis. 

Facilities: Studio equipped to handle six to 
eight complete room sets at one time; staff of 
65; photo laboratory technicians, engineering 
draftsmen, cartoonists, artists, directors, retouch- 
ers, electricians, carpenters; sound recording on 
contract with national organization. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Slidefilms: 7"/ie Forage Harvester; The "-UPO" 
Series Tractor I Deere & Co. ) ; The Tough Ones 
Are Human Too! (Morgan Linen Company). 
Fll.MSTRll's: .Steel Foundation of Civilization 
(series of fimr); Stainless Steel (2 strips); So 
You Want to Sell Pipe and Tubing (2 strips) ; 
5am Wakes I'p: Reinforcing Bars for Increased 
Sales: Sheet and Strip (2 strips) ; Carbon Steel 
Drill Rod (Inited Stales Steel Supply Div.. 
I nilid Slal.-K Sircl Corporation). 



CuicA(;o Film Sti dios 
OF Chicago Film Laboratory. 

.56 K. Superior Street 

Chicago II. Illinois 

Phone: WHitehall 4-6971 

Date of Organization: I92K 



In< 



Chicago Film Studios: continued 

OFFICERS AND DEPART.MENT HF,ADS 

A. G. Dunlap, President 

R. D. (iaslerline. Director of Sales 

George Jarrett, Production Manager 

Clare .McQuaid. Script 

Mike Dale, M. P. Ted Lee, Slide. 

Maurice Manzoeillo. Art and Animation 

Howard .Siemon. (mui. Ilovtard Schu\ler. .Sound 

Dick Carver, Editing Walter Rice, Lab. 

Services: From initial planning to release 
prints; 16nim and 35mm color and black and 
white motion pictures on advertising, sales pro- 
motion and job training, educational and travel: 
slidefilms, color; television commerciab. 

Facilities: Two sound stages; Mitchell. Bell 
& Howell and Maurer cameras: art and anima- 
tion; optical effects; RCA 35mm sound record- 
ing on film or 35mm magnetic tape; projection 
theatre: laboratory; creative staff. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Motion Picti res: Only Two. Save Those Seeds. 
It Pays to Take It Easy. SleeTs AV« Frontier, 
Grass Is Gold ( Allis-Chalmcrs Mfg. Co. ) : Ba- 
si4' Press ( Miehle Printing Press Co.): I'ersa- 
tality on Wheels (Oliver Corp.) : The Day the 
Cars .Stood .Still (Pure Oil Co.): World Seriet 
I9.'i2 I American 4> National I-eagues of I'rofes- 
sional Baseball Clubs I: Positioning Work .Auto- 
matically ((biddings & Lewis) : Moilel Cars .Sales 
Presentation. The Smoke-Filled Room. Puffed 
Grains Promotion Film 'S2-.'i.i. Pack-O-Ten 
( Quaker OaLs Co. I . 

TV Commercials for: S. C. Johnson, Kraft. 
Parker Pen. Quaker Oats. Osc-ar Mayer. Swift. 
Nestle Co.. Purity Bakeries, Elgin National 
Watch. General Motors. Allis-Chalmers. Hobart 
Mfg. Co.. Sears Roebuck and others. 



Francisco Films 

185 No. Wabash Ave. 

Chicago 1. 111. 
Phone: STale 2-0798 
Dale of Organization: 1942 
OFFICERS AND DEI'ARTMENT HF.ADS 
L. Mercer Francisco, Owner 
Services: Producer of sound motion pictures, 
sound slidefilms. filnistrips. 
Facilities: complete photographic facilities for 
production of slidefilms and auxiliary niateriab 
and advertising photographic illustrations in 
black and while and color in own Chicago stu- 
dio, centrally IcK-aled. 

RECE.NT I'RODICTIONS AND SPONSORS 
.Motion Pictire: More Power to You (Com- 
monuealth Edison Co.). 

Sol Ni) Slidefilms: Mo<lern Federal Tax lj>ie 
Reporting ( ("ommerce Clearing House): Big 
Ticket Tactics (Jacobs*- Mfg. Cj).) : Safe and 
Salable (Chicago Title i Trust Co.); Million 
Dollar Salesmen ( Hdene Curtis Industries, Inc.). 



The Jam Handy i^rpaiiization 

FiiE Jam IIanhv Ori.ani7.\tion. Inc.. 230 S. 
Michigan Avenue. Chicago 1. Illinois. Phone: 
STale 2-6757, l Cont'd on next page) 



1933 PROD I i;T ION H K\ 1 K* 



1 HICAGO AREA 



The Jam Handy Organization: cont'd 

Extensive creative and projection services 
maintained for the convenience of clients in 
the Chicago metropolitan area. (See Detroit 
listing for coniplrte data i:n JIIO services and 
facilities). 

Henning and Cheadle, Inc. 

Henninc and Cheadle, Inc.. 1140 So. Michigan 
Avenue. Phone WAbash 2-0570. F. E. Har- 
rold. branch manager. Complete photographic 
service for production: writer; distribution. 

Jerry F.\irbanks Productions 

Jerry Fairbanks Prodictio.vs. 520 N. Michi- 
gan Avenue. Chicago. III. F. McHugh. 

Dallas Jones Productions, Inc. 

1725 ]Xo. Wells Street 

Chicago 1-1, Illinois 

Phone: MOhawk 4-5525 

Date of Organization: 1947 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

Dallas Jones. President 

Marilou Jones. I ice President & Treasurer 

Richard Bowen. Secretary 

W. O. Zielke, Production Manager 

Services: Slidefilms, motion pictures and 
printed materials for training, public relations, 
information and sales. Complete package serv- 
ice, including distribution. 

Facilities: Sound and silent stages for slide- 
films and motion pictures. Mitchell cameras, 
magnetic sound recorder. Three completely 
equipped production crevis; five writers; stylist; 
artists. Slidefilm animation and duplicating. 
Special 18-piece strobe assembly for high-speed 
photography. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Sound Slidefilms: The Difference in Carrier 
(3 slidefilms for Carrier Corp.) ; Eye-Catching 
Displays (Texas Company) ; Mr. Casey Finds 
the Ansiver (Sears, Roebuck & Co.) ; The Proto- 
pectin Slory (Sunkist Growers, Inc.); Aunt Je- 
mima Goes to a Party (Quaker Oats Co.) ; 1953 
Dealer Meeting (International Harvester >; Be- 
ginning Sports Program (Athletic Institute) ; 
Sell the Burner (Harper Wyiiian) ; What's New? 
(Dan River Mills) ; Mummy Goes to Town 
(Swift & Co.) : Just Tell Thmi the Fads (The 
A. 0. Smith Corp.) : Masler-Mixed Painter's 
Textbook (7 slidefilm program for Sears, Roe- 
buck & Co.) ; Professional Drivers' Series (5 
film program for National Safety Council) ; 
$10,000 a Minute (Pure Oil Co.) : Service Is 
Your Business (Pullman Co.) and others. 

Safe Guidance for Film Buyers 
* With candor and cooperation, the vast ma- 
jority of established business and t.v. film pro- 
ducers have provided prospective users of their 
services with evidence of their clientele and of 
the character of work done during the past year. 
Careful use of these pages will safeguard your 
film program. 



Kling Studios. Inc. 

601 North Fairbanks Court 
Chicago 11, Hlinois 
Phone: DElaware 7-0400 
Date of Organization: 1928 
.Stidios: Chicago and 6650 Sunset Blvd.. Holly- 
wood 28. Calif. Lee Blevins. 
Branch Offices: 40 E. 51st St.. New York 22, 
N. Y. Seymour Thompson. 192!! (guardian Bldg.. 
Detroit. Mich. Stanley Jack. 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

Robert Eirinberg, President 

Lee Ble\ ins. Mgr. If' est Coast Operations 

Fred Niles, V.P., Dir. TV & MP Division 

David Savitt, Cam. Div. Chief 

Fred Frceland. Exec. Film Dir. 

Arthur Lewis Zapel. Dir. Scenario Div. 

Richard Hertel. Supervising Ed. 

SER\^CES: 16mm and 35mm motion pictures, in- 
dustrial training, public and civic relations, edu- 
cational, technical, slidefilms, animation, televi- 
sion commercials and television package shows. 

Facilities: Complete studio and sound stages: 
Research Council Crane, dollies: complete line 
of 35mm Mitchells and 16mm equipment. Ani- 
mation studio: Stancil-Hoffman and Magnecord 
recording facilities. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
.Motion Pictlres: Lines ami Fines (Admiral 
Corp.); Tennessee Story (Tenn. Products & 
Chem. Corp.) ; Skid Row (National Broadcast- 
ing Co.). 

Sound Slidefilms for: Admiral Corp. (7 films 
on Electronic Training) ; Sears Roebuck; Ham- 
ilton: Crosley (6 films): Hallicrafters; Mitchel. 
Television: Hormel .4ll-Girl Revietv (13 half- 
hour shows for Hormel Meat Co.) ; Adventures 
of Uncle Mistletoe (26 15-minute shows for 
Marshall Field Co. I : Frank Lloyd Wright (half- 
hour show" for N.B.C. ) : Boxing From Rainbo 
(13 half-hour boutsi Commercials for: U. S. 
Steel, Wrigley Chewing Gum, General Electric, 
Ohio Oil. Admiral. Mitchell .Air Conditioning. 
Chuckles Candy. Cats Paw. Ralston Purina. 
Raleigh Cigarettes, and others. 



Mervin W. La Rue, Inc. 

159 E. Chicago Avenue 

Chicago, Illinois 
Phone: SUperior 7-8657 
OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 
Mervin W. La Rue. Sr.. President 
Charles H. Hard, Sect. Treasurer 
Joanna LaRue, I ice President 
Services: Specializes exclusively in medical and 
scientific motion pictures and illustration — sur- 
gical, clinical, animation, microscopic, macro- 
scopic, etc. — for professional use. 
Facilities: .\l\ equipment for special field — ex- 
plosion proof for surgery, specially designed mi- 
croscopic and macroscopic, time lapse, and re- 
cording equipment and accessories. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Motion Pictures: Toxemia of Pregnancy (by 
N. S. Assali. M.D.: S. T. Garbcr. M.D.: R. D. 



Mervin W. LaRufi: continued 

Br>ant. M. D. Dept. of Obstetrics, U. of Cin- 
<innati I : Resection of a Congenital Diverticulum 
of the Left Ventricle (by Willis J. PotU, M.D.; 
Arthur De Boer. M.D. Children's Hospital. Chi- 
cago I : Diagnosis and Surgical Treatment of In- 
trathoracic Goiter (by John M. Dorsey, M.D.; 
Erwin M. Miller. M.D.; Gordon Brown, M.D.) ; 
Commisurotomy for Mitral Stenosis (Jerome 
Head. M.D.: Edward .Avery. M.D.) ; Congenital 
Anomalies of the Ear — Genesis and Correction 
(George Shambaugh. Jr.. M.D.: Eugene L. Der- 
lacki. M.D. ( and others. 



Mercury International Pictures 

Mercury International Pictures, 251 E. 
Grand Ave., Chicago 11. 111. Phone DElaware 
7-.39.34. (Tempo. Inc.) 
(see complete listing in Los .\ngeles area) 

Midwest Film Studios 

6808 No. Clark Street 

Chicago 26, Illinois 

( Reference details on recent productions & 

sponsors not submitted.) 

Stanley Neal Productions, Inc. 

435 North Michigan Avenue 

Chicago 11, Illinois 

Phone: WHitehall 4-3360 

(Complete listing under New York City) 

Paragon Pictures, Inc. 

2540 Eastwood Avenue 

Evanston, Illinois 

Phone: DAvis 8-5900 

Date of Organization: 1947 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

Robert Laughlin, President 

James E. Ford. Vice Pres. and SaJes Manager 

G. F. Garner, Secretary 

Sherwin Cazanov, Production Manager 

Services: Motion pictures and slidefilms in 
sound, color, black and white for advertising, 
public relations, training and education, sales 
improvement, product promotion and television; 
client planning service. 

Facilities: Sound recording; complete photog- 
raphy; studios with sets; editing; animation 
artists; script writers; music library and art 
work. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: The Captain's Idea (Rust- 
Oleum Corp.) : Behind the Scenes (Midwest Rub- 
ber Reclaiming Co.). 

SoiND Slidefilms: It's .\o Joke: The Captain 
of the .Men of Death: Having a ff oiiderful Time; 
The Long .Mght: and The Run Down (Zurich- 
-American Insurance Co. i . 



Pilot Productions, Inc. 

6419 No. California Avenue 

Chicago 45, Illinois 
Phone: AMbassador 2-4141 



78 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



Pilot Productions: continued 

Date of Organization: 1932 

(Incorporated in 1952) 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

Paul L. Dowty. President 
C. Robert Isely. Exeec. I ice President 
John A. Janssen. Program Director 
Charles A. Perry, Production Director 
Services: 16mm motion-TV-Lip Sync Record- 
ing. S5nim sound slidefilms and recordings. 
Giant display transparene-ies (color), Printon 
Color prints. Dupe color transparencies, Dye 
transfers, titling, animation. 
Facilities: Studio, sound stage and attendant 
equipment. Still color and black and white pro- 
cessing and printing laboratories. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Motion Pictike,s: Digging /or Your Future 
I Bucyrus-Erie) ; Aggregates Vnlimited (Iowa 
Manufacturing Co,) : A Netc Truck is Born f In- 
ternational Harvester) ; Michigan in Motion 
(Michigan Power Shovel Co,): Johnny on the 
Spot (Newspaper Reps, Assoc), 



Reid H, Ray Film Industries 
Reid H. Ray Film Inuistkies, Inc., 208 S. 
LaSalle St. Phone: Financial 6-0897. Frank 
Balkin. 

(Complete listing in St. Paul area) 



Rocket Pictures. Inc. 
Rocket Pictures. Inc.. .5.>1- \^\ Adams St.. Chi- 
cago. Ill, Phone: FRanklin 2-7270. J. Harry 
Ebbert. 
(see complete listing in Los .\ngeles area) 



Sarra, Inc. 

16 E. Ontario Street 

Chicago 11, Illinois 

Phone: Wllitehall 4-5151 

Date of Organization: 1937 

Branch Office: 200 E. 56tli Street 

New York 22. N. Y. 

Phone: Ml>ray Hill 8-0085 

OFRCERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

(\t New York City Studios) 

Valentino Sarra, President 

Morris Behrend, General Manager 

Robert Jenness, Director: Rex Cox. Director 

John Henderson III, Producer-Director 

Stanley Johnson, Director 

George Allman, Editor 

David Fletcher, Art Director 

(.\t Chicago Studios) 

Harry W. Lange, Production Manager 

Joseph G. Betzer, Director of Film Planning 

Helen Krupka, Scenario Sup. 

Wayne Langslon, Writer-Director 

Michael Stehney, Director 

Ray Mueller, Director 

Karl Oeser, Director 

George DeDecker, Art Director 

Harold A. Lignell. lAihoralor\ Manager 

Marvin Bailcv, Editor 



Sarra, Incorporated: continued 
Services: Creation and production of motion 
pictures, slidefilms and television commercials 
for sales, sales training, product promotion and 
information, employe training and indoctri- 
nation, safety training and promotion, public 
information, .\rmed Forces training subjects. 
Facilities: 16mm and 35mm motion picture 
cameras: still photographic equipment and per- 
sonnel: 16nHn and .'iomm editing; 16mm and 
35nim film processing laboratory: art and ani- 
mation: creative staff, 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Motion Pictures: A Gray Day for O'Grady. An 
Accident Happens to Sam, Picture Your Safety 
Target I National Safety Council). 
SoiNU Sl.lDEElLMS: Hou' to Stretch Your Food 
Dollars (Household Finance Corporation I : The 
37 Story. Service for Sales ( H. J. Heinz Co.) ; 
It Pays to Push Country Club (Western Auto) ; 
The X You Mark (Citizens Committee for the 
Banking Amendment) : Introducing the New 
Electric Range (Magic Chef. Inc.): Operating 
Heavy Dulv Trucks Snicly (National Safetv 
Council ( . 



John Sitherland Prodictions. I.nc. 

.•\ndiassador ^ est Hotel 

Chicago. Illinois 
Phone: Superior 7-7200 

I See Ciini[ilclc listing in Los Angeles Area) 



Viking Pictures Corporation 

1415 Howard Street 
Chicago 26. Illinoi^ 

Phone: AMbassador 2-68(H( 

Date of Organization: 1947 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

Sullivan C. Richardson. President 

Arnold Whitaker. lice President 

Scott Whitaker. l'. P. West Coast Productions 

Earl B. Brink. Board Member 

John K. Edmunds. Secretary-Treasurer 

Fredrick E. Strauss. Dir. of Production 

Services: Industrial, documentary, travel, edu- 
cational, animation, medical films. 
Facilities: Story development and script writ- 
ing staff: storyboards: animation: color. Two 
full field crews for location shooting and s\ii- 
chronous lip sync or sound recording. Portable 
lighting equipment adequate for large color 
interiors. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Motion Pictires: } <>iir Magic Messenger 
(Commonwealth Telcphime ('oinpany) ; Progress 
in Plumbing ( Iniversal Bundle Company) : The 
Wide Good Land (("hrysler Division): Turn- 
pikes in the Sky. The Pennstlvania Story (,'>tate 
of Pennsylvania). 



* * * Bold fail- stars appearing over list- 
ings indicate display advertising elsewhere in 
this .innual Prmluclion Review. 



\ ogue-Wright Studios 

(Division of Electrographic Corporation) 

469 E. Ohio Street 

237 E. Ontario Street 

Chicago 11, Illinois 

Phones: .MOliawk 4-56(KI. Vi Ilitehall 4-0244 

Date of Organization: 1931 
BR.ANCI1 Offices: 225 Fourth Avenue, New- 
York. N.Y. Phone: ALgonquin 4-.3400. Robert 
Shea. Vice President. laU N. Formosa Street, 
HollvHood. California. Phone: Granite 5111. 
Charles W. Shelly. Manager. 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

.Albert W. Dungan, President of Electrographic 

Corporation and .Manager of 

I'ogue-W right Studios 

Clinton Conrad. Executive I' ice-president 

William Faivre, Vice-president and Gen. Mgr. 

George T. Becker, Vice-president in charge of 

film sales and production 

James E. Holmes, Studio Marmger 

Services: Motion pictures, slide-motion, sound 
slide, television shorts and commercials, charts, 
manuals, booklets; films on industrial sales and 
personnel training, safety, public and civic rela- 
tions. 

Facilities: 100.000 square feet of floor space, 
Chicago; 40.000 square feet. New York. Staff of 
250 employees, complete motion picture and 
slide film equipment. Sound stage, editing, ani- 
mation, creative staff. Complete facilities of 
Samuel Gijldw\n Studios available in Hollvwood. 

RECE.NT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Motion Pictlres: Doubled in Spades (The 
Pure Oil Company) : Fog Over Portland tZenith 
Radio Corp.) : The A-3 Airborne Liieboat (Unit- 
ed States Air I'orce I : Big Business (Kraft Foods 
Company I : W ord of Honor ( Kaiser Frazer Sales 
Corp. ) . 

Sound Suoefilm.s: War Time Prodigy Becomes 
Peace Time Giant (Masland Duraleather Com- 
pany): Foamex . . . The .-insuer to Perfect 
Comfort (Firestone Tire & Rubber Co.): Built 
for Each Other (Zenith Radio Corp. I : MimI 
Your .Manners (Natl. .\ssn. of .\utomotive Mu- 
tual Insurance Companies!: Knou Your Man 
[ International Harvester Co. i . 



Wilding Picture Productions, Inc. 

1345 .Argyle Street 

Chicago 40. Illinois 

Phone: LOngbeaeh 1-8410 

Date of Organization: 1914 

Incorporation: 1927 

BraN( llES 

New York: 3S5 Madison .\ve.. New York, N. Y. 
Phone: Plaza ').(»8Sl. J. W. Inglefield, Vice 
President. 

Detroit: UX>0 Dime Building, Detroit, Michi- 
gan. Phone: Woodward 3-9311. L. S. 
Thompson, Vice President. 

(continued on the followinc pace) 



19S3 PRODUCTION REVIEW 



4 llir.U;0 AKEA: 

\\ ihiing Pictiirt' Pro(liu"tioii>: cont'd 
1345 Arjiyle Street 
Chioapo 10. Illinois 

BRANCH OFFICES: CONTINUED 
C.LEVKLA.\n: 1010 Euclid Avenue. Cle\elanH. 
Ohio. Phone: Tower 1-6440. Jark Rhein- 
siroin, f'ice President. 

I'lTTSiURGll: 429 Fiiurlh Ave., Room 1201. Pitts- 
burgh. Pa. Phone: Grant 1-6240. Ralph 
Mailland. in c/i-arge. 1 1 nder supervisiun uf 
Jack Rheinstrom.) 

ClNClNN.\Tl: Enquirer Building, Cincinnati, 
Ohio. Phone: Garfield 0477. R. L. McMil- 
lan, in charge. 1 1 nder supervision of Jack 
Rheinstrom.) 

Chicago: Address given above. George L. 
Schuyler, J'ice President 

St. Louis: 4378 Lindell Blvd., St. Louis, Mo., 
Phone: Lucas 0986. James E. Darst, in 
charge. I Under supervision of George L. 
Schuyler. ) 

Hollywood: 5981 Venice Blvd., Hollywood, 
California. Phone: Webster 0183. John 
Oser, in charge. 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

C. H. Bradfield, Jr.. President 

H. W. Fish, Executive Vice President 

V. A. Burg, Secretary-Treasurer 

M. W. Gibney, Production Development Dept. 

J. M. Constable, Production Development Dept. 

J. A. Kellock, Vi<:e President, Production 

Walter Tinkhani, Executive Assistant 

Jerome C. Diebold, Executive .Assistant 

Harold A. Witt. Executive Assistant 

Harold Kinzle, Laboratory Superintendent 

Gilbert Lee, Art Director 

A. J. Bradford, Customer Service & Equipment 

Duncan Taylor, Slidefilm Dept. 
Jack .\. Krieger, Advertising & Sales Promotion 

Services: Producers of sound motion pictures 
and sound slidefilms for commercial applica- 
tion and films for television. 

Facilities: 60,000 sq. ft. of Hoor space in main 
studio, Chicago; 27,000 ft. given over to three 
stages, 200x75, 100x70 and 100x50 ft.; re- 
mainder to administrative and creative offices, 
still and motion laboratories: optical and ani- 
mation departments, art studio, screening rooms, 
sound department, film vaults, carpenter shop 
and other departments. Stage facilities, screen- 
ing rooms and administrative offices also avail- 
able at company's Detroit and Hollywood studios. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
MoTio.N Pictures: Paradise for Buster (Deere 
& Co. I : Inside Harvester ( International Harvest- 
er Co. J ; Ticket to Freedom I Ford Motor Com- 
pany) ; Let's Face It! (U.S. Steel Corporation) ; 
Operation Mexico (Oldsmobile Div. General Mo- 



ll ililing I'irliirc Prodiiclions: iniiliiiiird 
tors (j)rp. I ; i^egend of Samson the Hdin ; Ram 
Pouer in .Irtion: The Red Ram I Dodge Divi- 
sion, Chrysler Corporation I : Cool Chips ( Cin- 
cijinati Milling Machine Co.) : The Freight Goes 
Through ( Association of American Railroads) : 
Colden Gloves Across the .Sea (The Chicago 
Tribune I : The Legend of Dan and Gus I Colum- 
bia Gas Sy.stems) : The Mark of C (Anheuser- 
Busch. Inc. I: and Treasure Farm (Sinclair Re- 
fining Co. I 

Sound Slidefilms: Numerous subjects produced 
for nation-wide clientele during 1952. 



Raphael G. Wolff Studios 

Raphael G. Wolff Studios: 2103 Orrington 
.\venue. Evanston, 111. Phone: D.\vis 8-7236. 
Carl Wester, representative. 
I See complete listing in Los Angeles area) 



iM^j/t □ iJ^Af en 



WEST CEIVTRAL 



Illinois 

The Venard Organization 

702 So. Adams Street 

Peoria 2, Illinois 

Phones: 4-2490 and 8261 

Date of Organization; 1923 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

C. L. Venard 

Frances B. Venard 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

( Reference details on recent productions 

and sponsors not submitted I 



Iowa 

General Pictures Productions, Inc. 

621 Sixth Avenue 

Des Moines 9, Iowa 

Phone: 3-4553 

Date of Organization: 1945 

Laboratory: Kempton Road 

Des Moines, Iowa. Phone : 3-8275 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

W. K. Niemann, President 

Ted Sloane. I ice President 

D. H. Bonine, I ice President, Laboratory Chief 

W. H. Schultz, Vice President, Production Chief 

Services: Industrial sales and job training and 

civic relations films: television subjects. 

Facilities: Sound and color camera and labora- 
tory equipment: sound recording and re-record- 
ing, direct-on-film, magnetic film, tape; color 
printing; animation; editing; creative staff. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Drake Relays of 1952 (Pepsi- 
Cola) : // You If ere a Chicken ( Hy-Line PouUrv 
Farms): One Goal. One Gift. One Time (Des 
Moines Community Chest I : Professional Cook- 
ing (Vocational Guidance Films I: // Film Talk 
(Christian Rural Overseas Program. 



Parrot Films Studio 

1700 Keo Way 

De.s Moines 14. Iowa 

Phone: 2-4211 

Date of Organization: 1919 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

Edward B. Goldman-T. P. Grinspan. Partners 

Services: 16mm films; 35mm theatre trailers: 
slidefilms; television animation. 
Facilities: Studio; 16mm and 35nmi cameras; 
sound recording: animation. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Safety .Series (Iowa Safety 
Congress); 7952 State Tournament (la. Girls 
H. S. Athletic Union). 

(Sou.ND Slidefilms: Tractors: .Mebraska Test 
( Oliver Corporation I : Maytag Service ( Maytag) . 
TV Commercials: Metz Brewing; Hiland; Chev- 
rolet Dealers of Iowa; Staley; Roto Rooter Co.; 
Storz Brewing Co. 

Tele-Visual Productions 
913 Walnut Street 
Des Moines 9, Iowa 

(Reference details on recent productions & 
sponsors not submitted.) 

Centron Corporation. Inc. 

1107 Massachusetts 

Lawrence. Kansas 

Phone: 50 

Date of Organization: 1950 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

Arthur H. Wolf, President & Exec. Producer 

Fred S. Montgomery, Vice President 

Russell Mosser. Secretary-Treasurer 

Charles Lacey. Director of Production 

Norman Stuewe. Motion Picture Photography 

Margaret Travis. Script & Filmstrip Prod. 

Harold Harvey. Director 

Maurice Prather, Still Photography 

Services: 16mm motion pictures and slidefilms 
for public relations, sales, training, and educa- 
tion. Animation and recording service. Subcon- 
tracting. Specialized sports photography. TV 
films. 

Facilities: Sound stage (.3000' I: Mitchell and 
Cine Special cameras: lighting and sound equip- 
ment for studio and location. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Infinite Harvest (Spencer 
Chemical Co.): To the Stars; Championship 
Basketball at Kansas: Football Highlights of 
1952 (University of Kansas I ; \CAA Basketball 
I National Collegiate Athletic .^ssn I . Speech: 
Conducting a Meeting (Young America Films, 
Inc.). Other films and filmstrips for Young 
America Films, including 29 filmstrips. TV com- 
mercials for Western Auto. 

i^linnosota 

•tt -ti -d 

Empire Photosound, Inc. 

1920 Lyndale .\venue. South 

Minneapolis 5. Minnesota 

Phone: Kenwood 7600 

Date of Organization: 1945 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



Empire Photosound : continued 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

William S. Yale, President 

Charles B. Woehrle. Secty-Treasurer 

Catherine Running, Business Manager 

Truman Bjorkluntl. Production Manager 

Arthur Nicol. Camera Dejiarlmeni 

Frederick Morgan. Story Board & Animation 

Leslie Blacklock. Editorial Dept. 
Warren Rose. Sound — Roy Newquist. Script 

Services: Motion pictures for industry-, sales 
training and TV.: animation: sound slidefilms. 
Sulxrontracting work. 

Facilities: Creative dept.: script, storvboard 
and artwork. Maurer camera. 3 completely 
equipped film editing rooms: electronically con- 
trolled animation stand for 16mm and 35mni 
color, b&w motion pictures, slidefilms. Ampex 
syTichronous recording in studio and on location. 
Maurer multiple 16mm sound tracks. Bank of 
.5 Magnecorders for tape dubbing service. Time- 
lapse, slow-motion equipment. Large sound stage 
accommodates 5 sets simultaneously. 

RECENT PRODICTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Motion Pictures: Beauty Through Science 
iRayette, Inc.) : Farmhand .\eus I Superior Sep- 
arator Co.); Futuramic (Minneapolis-Honey- 
well): Newsreel #2 (General Mills I: Color in 
Stone (Minnesota Mining) . 
Sound Slidefilms: .\eu Arenues of Profitable 
Business; The Magic of Glass: Build Better With 
Insulite I M & Paper Co. I : Profits Through 
Preference: Preference With Permanence I Brown 
& Bigelow) ; Keep Your Customer in Business 
(Pako Corporation) ; and others. 
TV Commercials: for The Dayton Co.: First 
Group of Banks: Maple Island Dairies: Gluek 
Brewing Co.: Nicollet Hotel: Toro Mfg. Corp.: 
etc. 



Reid H. Ray Film I.ndustries 

2269 Ford Parkway 

St. Paul 1, Minnesota 

Phone: EMcrson 1393 

OFnCERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

Reid H. Ray, President 

WiUiam H. Ringold, V.P. C. H. Nyquist, Treas. 

Alice M. Griswold, Secretary 

E. H. Polsfuss. Production Manager 

C. H. Bradshaw. Laboratory Superintendent 

Robert Berg. Art Director 

Frank J. Havlicek. Asst. to the President 

Services: 16mni and 35mm motion pictures and 
slidefilms; color; theatre screen advertising pro- 
duction and distribution: television commer- 
ciab created and produced. 

Facilities: Studio, sound recording, creative 
staff. Distribution. 

RECENT PRODICTIONS AND SPONSORS 

M<ition Pictlres: Tom Gordon Goes Modern: 
Costly Bargains: What's \eiv for S.'i (Deere & 
Company I : Milestone in Medicine ( Smith. Kline 
& French I.aboratories I : Haukeye Sports Pa- 
rade ( I niversity of lowai: The Kana I'ijyen 



Reid H. Ray Film Industries: continued 
Frog Test for Pregnancy ( Dr. Jane Hodgson I : 
and others. 

SoiND Slidefilms: Quality Speaks; Who'/ 
What? Where? (Brown & Bigelow) ; Every- 
thing's Under Control (Cutler-Hammer. Inc.): 
and others. 



Reid Ray Television Prodlctions. Inc. 

2269 Ford Parkway 

St. Paul 1. Minnesota 

Phone: EMerson 1393 

Branch: 8762 Holloway Drive. Los Ani;eles 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

Reid H. Rav. President 

William Ringold. Secty and Treasurer 

.Saul Elkins. I ice Pres. and Producer 

Frank J. Havlicek, Vice President 

Services: Production, sale and distribution of 
television syndicated packaged films. 
Facilities: Studio, sound recording, creative 
staff. Distribution. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
TV. Motion Pictures: Sporting Chance (26 
minute programs, in series) ; Sports Album of 
Fame 1 13 minute programs, in series) . 



>lis»>ouri 

The Calvin Compa.ny 

1105 Truman Road 

Kansas City 6. Missouri 

Date of Organization: 1931 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

F. 0. Calvin. President 

Lloyd Thompson. First I ice President 

Larry ."^herwood. I ice-Pres. & Gen. Sales Mgr. 

Neal Keehn. / . P. in Charge of Services 

Frank Barhydt. l. P. in Charge of Productions 

James Sund. I . P. in Charge of Manufacturing 

B. C. Calvin. Secty-Treasurer 

Dick Bulkeley. Executive Director 

James Hash. Comptroller 

Leonard Keck, Operating Manager 

Ken Moran. Business Manager 

Maxine Covell, Office Manager 

Services: 16mm color sales and sales training 
films; service work for other producers and for 
universities. 

Facilities: 8,000 sq. ft. studio space; location 
equipment for three crews: laboratorv with out- 
put of 25.000,000 ft. black and white, 20,000,- 
CKX) ft. color a year: Kodachrome processing; 12 
editing rooms: two sound studios with six chan- 
nels, four phono, recording equipment for film, 
tape. wax. magnetic film: six full-time directors: 
ireative staff. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Motion Pictures: Seeing Is Believing (Cater- 
pillar Tractor Co.): Trouble With Potts I B. F. 
Goodrich Co.); The Dirty Look (Ciulf Oil 
Corp. I : The Joanna Story (Joanna Western 
Mills t; Deep Waters (Layne & Bowler. Iilc.) ; 
Pay Dirt (Lion Oil I ; King Basketball (Official 
Sports Films! : The Mice Will Play (Phillips 
Petroleum Co. t ; The Sound of America ( South- 
em Pine Association). 



St. Louis 



Condor Films, Inc. 

1006 Olive Street 

St. Ix>uis 1, Missouri 

Phone: MAin 8876 

Date of Organization: 1951 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

Arthur E. Wright, Jr., President 

Bradford W'hitney, lice President 

Walter S. Craig, Dir. of Photog. 

Otto Rauhut, Chief Sound Engineer 

E. K. Stoeppelwerth. Cameraman 
Victor C. Lewis. Jr.. A.C.E.. Editor 
>ervices: 16mm and 35mm commercial, indus- 
trial, training, sales, and television motion pic 
tures. TV commercials. Sound slidefilms. 
Facilities: Sound stage. Mitchell and Bell & 
Howell cameras. Fearless Panoram dolly. Mo- 
violas. .Magnetic recording (Hi^mm and Vi in. I. 
Six-channel mixing, completely interlocked. Su- 
personic galvanometer-type optical recorder. 
Complete creative, writing, and production staff. 

RECENT PRODI CTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Motion Pictures: Assignment lO.i (St. Louis 
Conmiunity Chest I: Out of the Shadoiv (Boys 
Town of Missouri ) : Road to Citizenship ( St. 
Louis Girl Scout Council I ; Once Upon the Wa- 
Imsh (Wabash Railroad Company) : Seal of Ex- 
cellence (in production) (Monsanto Chemical 
Company). 

Sound Slidefilm: The Division 38 Story-Mer- 
chandising (Sears. Roebuck & Co.). 
TV Commercials: for Anheuser-Busch. Inc.; 
International Shoe Co.; Steelcote Paint Co.: 
Krey Packing Co.: Meletic Sea Food Co.: etc. 



Premier-Hardcastle Productions 

3033 Locust St. 

St. Louis 3. Mo. 

Phone: Newstead 3555 

Branch: 818 Olive St. Phone: CEutral 7620 

Date of Organization: 1948 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

Theodore P. Dcsloge. General Manager 

J. H. Hardcastle. Asst. Manager 

Wilson Dalzell. Sound 
Roger E. Leonhardt. Production 
Richard Hardcastle. Photography 
Services: 16min and 35mm films for industry, 
public relations, religious and civic organiza- 
tions: TV commercials: sound slidefilms. 
Facilities: Motion picture and sound recording 
equipment; sound stage (2000'); two recording 
studios; mobile unit for location work. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Motion Pictires: H Tons of Champions (.-Vn- 
heuser-Busch. Inc. I: Troubled Children (.Metho- 
dist Children's Home I; \o One .-tlone (Jeivish 
Federation) . 

Sound Slidefilms: Sales Conference (The Se\- 
en Up Co.) ; Purina Learned a Lesson (Ralston 
Purina Co.). 

TV Com.mercials: for Old Judge Coffee: Knapp 
Monarch Mfg. Co.; Southwestern Bell Telephone 
Co.; St. Louis Community Chest; Tigrett Enter- 
prises, etc. 
(CONTINUED ON THE FOLLOWING PACE) 



19 3 3 PRODUCTION 1( K \ I E Vi 



WEST CENTRAL 



St. Liiiiis: fotitinin-ti 



Wilding Picliirc I'nitlurtions 
W'li.uiNC PicTiKE Prodimtions. Inc.. WTH Lin- 
dell Boulevard. Si. Louis, Missouri. I'hone: 
LUcas 0986. James Darst, in charge. 
Under supervision of Geo. L. Schuyler. 

Film Arts Corporation 

1032 N. Sixth St. 

Milwaukee, Vi'isconsin 

Phone: BR. 6-5670 

Date of Orgsanization: 1927 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

A. K. Hadley. Presidenl 

Harlan P. Croy. General Manager, Treasurer 

Sermces: 16mm and 35mm industrial, sales 
training motion pictures; sound slidefilms, 
slides: TV commercials and shorts. Complete 
16mm and 35mm lab service. 
Facilities: 16nmi and 35mm cameras: lighting 
equipment for studio or location: stock and 
special sets: recording facilities (magnetic, disc, 
and film). 16 and 35mm. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Motion Pictures: First Time hi History 
iSchlitz Brewing Co.) : Family Cruise. Outboard 
Style I Evinrude Motors! : Quality Canning (Cly- 
man Canning Co.) . 

SoiND Slidefilms: Reference Call: Better Ways 
to Health I West Bend Aluminum Co.). 



Vernon J. Kraft Film Productions 

840 N. Plankinton Avenue 
Milwaukee 3, Wisconsin 
Phone: Marquette 8-6472 
Date of Organization: 1937 
OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 
Vernon J. Kraft, Partner 
Frances M. Kraft, Partner 
Services: Industrial, sales and job training and 
sports entertainment motion pictures and slide- 
films. 

Facilities: Maurer and Bell & Howell cameras; 
lights, stage block and cables for interiors and 
exteriors: animation department; script writing. 

RECENT MOTION PICTURES AND SLIDEFILMS 

( Reference details on recent productions & 
sponsors not submitted. I 



The Buyer's Guide to Good Films 

♦ The many thousands of business concerns, 
trade groujjs. government bureaus and advertis- 
ing agencies who now buy and use this Produc- 
tion Review look to these up-to-date references 
on recent productions and sponsors jor depenil- 
Me buying guidance. Preview and check w ith 
sponsors listed to assure satisfaction. The best 
sources appear in these pages. 



IB- if CD 11. 4f C2 



SOUTHWEST 



TfxaN 

Gulf Coast Films, Inc. 

309 Oil and Gas Building 

Houston 2, Texas 

Phone: Blackstone 5471 

Bran, h: 9 W. 61st St.. New York City 

Phone: Circle 6-0191 

Date of Organization: 1950 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

Robert Yarnall Richie, President 

Virginia G. Richie, Secretary-Treasurer 

Fredrick W. Bryant, New York Sales Rep. 

.Services: Motion pictures. Richie-graphs, slide- 
films and still photography, b&w or color. Script- 
ing and story board treatments. Counsel on dis- 
tribution. 
Facilities: Mitchell cameras, complete lighting 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Motion Pictures: 100 Years in Texas I South- 
ern Pacific Lines I: Make No Mistake (Geo- 
physical Service I . Only sponsors listed. 



Jamieson Film Company 

3825 Bryan Street 

Dallas, Texas 

Phone: TEnnison 8158 

Date of Organization: 1916 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

Hugh V. Jamieson, Manager 

Bruce Jamieson, Manager, Sound and Laboratory 

Hugh V. Jamieson, Jr., Production Manager 

Dean Babbitt, Writer-Director 

Robert Alcott, Camera Department 

Hope Peters, Kodachrome color correction 

Services: Industrial, educational, training and 
Bales promotion motion pictures, 16mm and 
35mm; short advertising subjects for theatres 
and television; sound adding service. 

Facilities: Studio and sound stage, RCA 16mm 
and 35mm sound, synchronized sound shooting, 
16mm and 35mm: laboratory service; Koda- 
chrome printing with scene-to-scene color cor- 
rection; animation; creative staff. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Motion Pictures: .4ir Force Fire Power (U. S. 
Air Force) : Killers on the Highway (State of 
Mississippi I : i'our Hightvay Patrol (State of 
Tennessee) : Canine Comments (13 TV shows) ; 
Betsy and the Magic Key I 39 TV Shnusl, 



■Robert Yarnall Richie Productions 

Robert Yarnall Richie Productions, Inc., 
309 Oil and Gas Building, Houston 2, Texas. 
Phone: Blackstone 5471. 
(see complete listing under New York City) 



Texas Indisiuiai. Film Company 
919 .M & M Building 

iloMsion 2, Texas 
Phone: Charter 9371 
Date of Organization: 1945 
N. Don Macon, Owner and Operator 
Services: Industrial training and sales promo- 
tion motion pictures, 16mm sound, color; 35mni 
sound slidefilms. Extensive specialized experience 
in production of INSECT films. 
Facilities: 16mm camera and lighting equip- 
ment; disc, magnetic tape and 16mm optical 
sound recording; picture and sound editing; 
printing equipment for 16mm motion pictures 
and 35mm slidefilms. Personnel for writing and 
direction. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Mf)TIO.\ PlCTliRES; Pollination oj Alfalfa. The 
Alfalfa Weevil and Its Control. The Spiltlebug 
and lis Control I Hercules Powder Compan) I ; 
The Steel Industry in Texas (Humble Oil & 
Refining Company): The Twin Blast Rock Bit 
I Reed Roller Bit Compan\ I. 



MOUNTAIIV STATES 



Colorado 

Thos. J. Barbre 
Motion Picture Productions 

1215 E. Virginia Avenue 

Denver 9, Colorado 

Phones: RAce 4605 and 4606 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

Thos. J. Barbre, Owner, Manager, Producer 

Paul Emrich. Recording Director 

Don Hoffman. Director of Photography 

Services: 16nim production from script to 

screen: color: sound; public relations and sales 

films. 

Facilities: Maurer Cameras and 100,000 watts 
lighting equipment: sound-on-film recording, 
16nnu magnetic, disc; Maurer six track sound 
truck and generator: editing: animation and 
titling equipment and staff; recorded music li- 
brary and staff organist: editors: script WTiter. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Motion Pictures: Pay Dirt! (Gardner-Denver 
Company): You're Telling Us (Great Western 
-Sugar Company): .Men of Mines (Colorado 
School of Mines): Coin' Fishing (State of 
Colorado ) . 

TV Commercials for: Colorado Fuel & Iron 
Corp. and Gates Rubber Company. 



Jean M. F. Dubois Motion Pictures 

('The Jean Dubois Com pan yj 

2214 Dahlia Street 

Denver 7, Colorado 

Reference details on recent productions 

and sponsors not submitted 

(continued on following pace 84) 



B I S I N E S S SCREEN MAGAZINE 




BUSINESS 



TO USE fCGiJG7*G 



TAPE RECORDING 

REVERE TAPE RECORDER — Takes dictation, records importont meetings, 
speeches, inventory, production details! Reviews important points for sales or 
employee training. Permits soles staff to practice and improve soles technique. 
Doubles OS an entertainer at company social offairs. 



Model T-700— Brings you [ 
fidelity hererofore obroinot 



nly in < 
feuionol broodcail equipment. Exclusive index 
counter permits instont location of any port of 
recorded reel. Automatic "keyboard" controls. 
Full two hours ploy on each 7-inch reel of eraj- 
oble, re-usoble tope. Complete with microphone, 
radio ottochmenl cord, 2 reels (one with lapel 
ond carrying case $225.00 



rformance and high TR-SOO — Some as above with bulll-in 

.stiy pro- radio $277.50 

ve index 

Special Studio Models— Speed 7.50 

T-10 — Complete with microphone, radio ottoch- 
menl cord, 2 reels lone with topel ond carrying 

case $235.00 

TR-20 — Some as obove with built-in 

rodio $2»7.50 



MOVIE PROJECTION 

REVERE •16" SOUND PROJECTOR — Projects your soles story at its best! 
Brilliant, clear, natural picture and true "theater" tone. Lightweight and exceptionally 
compact — for easy portability from company to company. So easy to thread 
and operate — your beginning salesmen will use it like on expert! 
750-walt lamp brilliance; fast 2-inch F 1.6 coated lens. Complete with speaker- 
carrying case and cord, take-up reel, 1600' reel extension orm, instructions. $325.00 




SOUND MOVIES 

REVERE SOUND-MOVIE SYNCHRO-TAPE— Increases the value of your 
old silent films — by adding sound. Use films again and again by changing the 
message to fit each new business situation. Moke revisions quickly, easily. 
Revere Sound-Movie Synchro-Tope is especiolly designed to enable you to 
synchronize picture and sound perfectly. One 5" reel provides sound for 
800 feet of 8mm film or 1600 feel of 16mm film. Complete with 
Synchro-Reflector, directions. Per reel, $7.85 



f<^iJ 



GrG 



JtECORDING 
)UND EQUIPMENT 



REVERE CAMERA COMPANY 
CHICAGO 16, ILLINOIS 



1 0.1.1 I' KO I) I ( r 1(1 N l( K. \ I K VL 



MOI'IVTAIN STATKS: 



ll<>nv«'r: <Mtii(inii«'il 

ArTHI It (;. KlPI'KV AM) (OMPANY 

53(t First Naliunul Hank Building 

Donvcr 2, Colorado 

Phone: TAlior 0221 

Date of Orfianization: 19-13 

OFFICERS AM) DEPARTMF.NT HEADS 

Arthur G. Rippcy. Managing Partner 

Clair G. HpiuiersDii. I'arlner. deneral Manager 

Gilbert N. Buri<mmi. Partner. Production Head 

Kohert R. Powell. Asst. Production Head 

Harry A. Lazier, Partner 

Services: Industrial and civic relations motion 
pictures, color and sound, both voice-over and 
lip synchronization: sound slidefilms, black and 
white and color: glass slides, black and white 
and color. 

Facilities: 16nim camera equipment, portable 
recording and recording supervision, editing, 
creative staff, a fully staffed art department. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
MoTiO-X Pictures: One Million People I Des 
Moines Register and Tribune I: Right oj Way- 
Brush Control I Osmose Wood Preserving Com- 
pany ( : Idaho on the March I Idaho First Nation- 
al Bank); The Rich loiva Farm Market (Des 
.Moines Register and Tribune). 
.^Ol.NU .SlidefilM: Letter lo the Leaguers I Wheat 
Ridge Foundation!. 

SONOCHROME PICTURES 

2275 Glencoe Street 

Denver 7, Colorado 

Phone: East 3192 

Date of Organization: 1942 

Branch: Multichrome Laboratories 

760 Gough Street. San Francisco. California 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

R. B. Hooper, Oicner-Producer 

George E. Perrin, Director oj Photography 

Herbert McKenney, Owner, Mullichrome 

Laboratories 

Services: Industrial and civic interest motion 
pictures, tourist promotion and safety films. 

Faciuties: Sound and color cameras, mobile 
generator equipment, sound and tape recorders, 
animation, title and effects departments, color 
printing, art and writing departments, and TV 
production facilities. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Motion Pictures: Chiropractic Proof (Spear"s 
Sanitorium I : Destination ... a Mile High I Den- 
ver Conve' lion & Visitors Bureau); Farm in a 
Day I Douglas Fir Plywood Assn. ) : Magic Won 
derland I Colorado State Adv. & Publicity Bu 
reau) : Monument Valley. Hemhck lo Head- 
lines (Denver & Rio Grande Western Railroad 
TV Commercials: for Curt Freiberger. Max 
Goldberg and Robertson Advertising Agencies. 

Extra Copies Availaltle at $].(MI 
Vou can obtain extra copies of this compleli 
issue sent postpaid on receipt of order containing 
•Sl.OO. Write to 7()64 Sheridan. Chicago 26. 



^J^ Af CD uu *f rn 



WEST COAST 



.X4»rlli<>rn 4'alifitrnia 

C.\l. PlCTl KES 

66.') Harrison Street 
San Prancixo 7. California 

I'lione: '^ Ikon 6-6(138 
lislinf; of MiMpin in Los Angeles I 



Motion Picture Service Company 

125 Hyde Street 
San Francisco 2, California 

Phone: ORdway 3-9162 
Date of Organization: 1935 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 
Gerald L. Karski. President, General Manager 

Harold A. Zell, Production Manager 
Boris Skopin. Manager, Title and Trailer Dept. 
Albert Niggemeyer, Manager, Laboratory Dept. 
Services: Industrial, commercial and public 
relations films, including series for Standard Oil 
Company of California, on outstanding events 
in western states for theatrical release; also 
special announcement trailers for theatres, pro- 
motion trailers and TV commercials. 
Facilities; 16mm and 35mm laboratories; title 
and animation equipment; art department; pre- 
view and cutting rooms; Stancil-Hoffman Mag- 
netic Tape Recording. 16mm & 35mm film re- 
cording; script-to-release print facilities. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Motion Pictures: Date Festival. Columbia Ba- 
sin Water Festival. Road to Hangtown ( Standard 
Oil Co. of California). 

TV CoMiMERClALS; for Peet Soap, Italian Swiss 
Colony Wines. Calo Dog Foods. Daylight Sav- 
ings Campaign. Harvey-Nash Automobile 
Agency. 



W. A. Palmer Films, Inc. 

611 Howard Street 

San Francisco 5, California 

Date of Organization: 1936 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

W. A. Pahner. President 

H. B. Butler. V.P.-Treas. 

F. E. Boothe, Comptroller 

Florence H. Dieves. Prod. Dir. 

Joseph P. Dieves, Camera 

Services; Industrial public relations and sales 

training films; sound slidefilms; television films 

and spot commercials; kinescope. 16mm and 

35mm. 

Facilities: Studio and location photography; 
sound recording including film, magnetic film, 
tape and disc, multiple channel dubbing and 
Interlock; color and black and white printing, 
and 16mm optical printer: Kinescope; 35nmi 
Moviola and editing equipment; animation art- 
ist ; writers and editors. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Motion Pictures: Friend in the Cupboard 
( California Cling Peach ./^dvi.sorv Board 1 : The 



II . I. I'litmrr Films: ronlitiucd 

Doctors' Plan ((."alif. Physicians' Service I; A 
Century oj Light (Pacific Gas and Electric Co. I. 
Ri( iir<ling. editing and printing of the follow- 
ing: Miilto Grosso Journey. Wind and Spray. 
Handling Pipe Around Drilling Rigs (Standard 
Oil Company of California); Kirkuk lo Banias. 
A.U.B.. Netv Fuel jor New England. Cerro 
Bolivar (Rcchlel International Corporation* ; 
Kdonull Builders ( Pacifn (ias and Electric Com- 
pany I : Opernlion Snow Shovel (Pacific Tele- 
phone & Telegraph Co. I ; Calijornia State Parks. 
Yours lo Choose (University of California) ; Ra- 
diation Hazards Control, Operalion .Sample. No 
Comedy in Errors (General Electric Company) : 
Boeing Presents (Boeing Airplane Company). 
Television: Standard Hour (sound recording and 
filming via Palmer televisicjn recording system) 
(Standard Oil Company of California I ; Tele- 
I'enlure Tales (sound recording and filming via 
Palmer television recording system. KING-TV. 
Seattle). 

Sound Slidefilms: Showing a Properly (Uni- 
versity of California): Free Tire Inspection 
(Standard Stations. Inc.). 



Rocket Pictures. Inc. 

Rocket Pictures. Inc.. 681 Market St.. San 
Francisco. Cahfornia. Phone: YUkon 2-3625. 
Harry G. Swift. 
(^Coniplete Hsting under Los Angeles area) 

Photo & Sound Productions 

116 Natoma Street 

San Francisco 5, California 

YUkon 2-3986 

Date of Organization; 1938 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

Donald M. Hatfield. President 

Charles A. Larrance. Director 

Fred P. Barker. Art Director 

William C. Eymann. Chiej Cinematographer 

James B. Gahan. Production Coordinator 

Rosemary Dolan. Research Department 

Louis A. Humason. Director oj Sales 

Services: Public relations, sales, documentary 
and training films; medical motion pictures: 
television program and commercial films; slide- 
films, filmstrips. 

Facilities: 35mm Eclair and 16mm Maurer 
cameras and recording systems: sound and si- 
lent stages; complete editing equipment for 
35mm and 16mm; animation department; crea- 
tive staff: contract script writing. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

.Motion Pictures: As the City Sleeps (V. S. 
State Dept. I ; Adjuslmenis jor .Accuracy (Mag 
na Engineering Corp I : Prenatal Care. Postnatal 
Care (Medical Films. Inc. I. 

Sound Slidefilms: Industrial Lubricants 
(Standard Oil of California); Coast Counties 
Annual Report (Coast Countv Gas & Electric 
Co. ! . 

TV Commercials; 122 TV commercials pro- 
duced in 1952. 



84 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



Northern California 



^ ALTER A. Rivers & Associates 

28 Geary Street 

San Francisco 8. Calif. 

Phone: Sitter 1-1284 

Studio in Burlingame. California 
Date of Or<;anization: 19-19 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

Walter A. Rivers, President 

Donald A. Rivers. Exec. V ice President 

Walter Wise, Production Manager 

Services: General motion picture production, 
specializing in films for industry, television, 
public relations and sales training. 
Facilities: Auricon sound cameras; recording 
system, film and tape: titles and animation: 
HTiting: editing and art staff. 

RECENT PRODICTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Motion Pictures: Soviet Union's Cannon Fod- 
der (Committee for a Free Asia) : 5. F. 49'ers 
1951 Highlights (Goebel Beer Co.) : A Hospital 
Is People (Mt. Zion Hospital I : Maimonides 
I Maimonides Health Center I : The Curtain of 
Time I own sponsorship for television release) . 

For Extra Copies of This Issue 

urite Business Screen. 7064 Sheridan Road, 
Chicago 26. Sl.OO per copy, sent postpaid. 



Gene K. ^ alker Productions 

465 California Street 
San Francisco 4, California 

Phone: YUkon 6-2891 
Date of Organization: 1938 
Studio at 629 Connnercial Street. San Francisco. 
California. Phone: YUkon 24181 
OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 
Gene K. Walker, Sole Owner 
\^ alter \^ ise. Production Manager 
George Insehnan. Asst. Production Manager 
Hugh Bodden. Asst. Production Manager 
Bruce S. Sedlev. Chief .Sound Technician 
Services: Camera, lighting, titling, editing, ani- 
mation, sound, color service for industrial and 
documentary motion pictures: slidefilms and 
filmstrips: corollary visual aids. 

Facilities: 4-unil Stancil- Hoffman ITVimm 
magnetic tape recording, plus interlock; 16inni 
film recording: laboratory; Type A and B ani- 
mation equipment and staff: creative staff with 
two full-time writers. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Motion Pictures: Snoic on the Run (Southern 
Pacific Company I : Dipstick Dividends ( Stand- 
ard Oil Co. of California): The Bounty of the 
Forest (Western Pine Association): Chicago 
Market Report (liiion Stock Yard and Transit 
Compan\" ) . 



IB- if □ im. i^ CI la. jj9> rn 



METROPOLITAIV LOS ANGELES 



Academy Productions 

7934 Santa Monica Boulevard 

Hollywood 46. California 

Phoiie: Hollywood 9-.i873 

Date of Organization: 1951 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

Edward L. Gershman and C. Murav Foutz. 

Partners 

Arthur Babbitt. Supervising Director 

WiHiani Lightfield. Production Manager 

Services: Motion pictures and animation, both 

16mni and 35mm. 

Facilities: No data provided. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Titles unknown but sponsor references provid- 
ed include General Electric Companv: Mc- 
Graw Hill Book Co.: J. Walter Thompson Co.: 
Champion ."^park Pkig; and Pan American Air- 
ways. 



All Scopl Pr:tlre><. Inc. 

7525 Beverly Boulevard 
Hollywood 36. California 

Phone: \^ Yoming 1128 
Date of Organization: 1946 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

Gordon S. Mitchell. President 

C. D. Owens. I ice President 

La Nell B. Mitchell. Secretary-Treasurer 

Norval D. Crutcher. Jr.. Production Mgr. 

Services: Industrial, piiblir relations, education- 



al and training films. TV commercials and thea- 
tre ad films. Live action, animation and or stop 
motion production. 

Facilities: Sound stage, cutting rooms and pro- 
jection room; animation department. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Motion Pictures: Good Wrinkles (California 
Prune i Apricot Growers Assn. I In Flight Re- 
fueling ( L . S. Air Force I ; Les Voyage de George 
Grenet I .Madeliene Films. Paris. France^ . 
Sound Slidefilm: Good to Feel Good (Califor- 
nia Prune & Apricot Growers Assn. i 

TV Commercials and theatre ad fihns for SOS 
Corp.: Rosefield Packing Corp.; Lewis Milani 
Food Co.: Erwin-Wasev Co.: Sunsweet Prunes: 
Newport Soap Co.: etc. 



Ape.x Film Corpor.\tion 

General Service Studios 

1040 No. Las Palnias 
Hollywood 38. California 
Date of Organization: 1945 

Iranrh Office: 38 K. 5:th St.. New York. N.Y. 

Jack Chertok, President 
Harry H. Poppe, Associate Producer 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

( Reference details on recent productions & 
sponsors not submitted. I 



Ai die.nce Tested Productions. Inc. 

2330 ^. Third St. 

Los Angeles 5. California 

Phone: DUnkirk 7-4274 

Date of Organization: 1947 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

Btrnard 1). Cirlin. President 

Paul Burnford. In Charge of Production 

Harold Braun. Chief. Writing 

Millon Zolotow. Art Director 

Sekvues: Industrial, public relations, training 

films. 

Facilities: 16mni and 35min cameras, lighting. 

Complete facilities for pre-tesling films with the 

patented Audience Reactograph. Complete art 

department. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Motion Pictures: Securely Yours (Kwikset 
Locks Inc. I : Powdered Metallurgy (Powdered 
Metal Division. Kwikset Locks. Inc.); Home 
I entilating (Marvin Manufacturing Co.). Only 
1952 title references provided. 



Gate & McGlone 
1521 Cross Roads of the World 
Hollywood 28. CaliL 
Phone: GLadstone 1118 
Date of Organization: 1947 
OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 
T. W. Gate, Partner 
E. D. McGlone. Partner 
Charles Cahill. Production Manager 
Services; Sales promotion, training, public re- 
lations, informational motion pictures and T\ 
fihns; color films and location work. 
Facilities; 16mm photographic equipment, port- 
able lighting equipment, creative staff for writ- 
ing, photographing, directing and editing. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Day In Court (International 
Harvester Company ) : Scotty W ins Her Wings 
( I nited Air Lines I : Case of the Mileage .Vlasters 
(General Petroleum Corporation I ; Waiercolor 
Painting (Brandt-Dike .\rt School): A Family 
Portrait ( Roy Rogers Enterprises ) . 

TV Commercials: spots and chain breaks for 
N. W. Aver & Son. Inc. Ghent; United Air Lines. 



P.\T DowLiNc Pictures 

1056 So. Robertson Boulevard 

Los Angeles 35. California 

Date of Organization: 1940 

Pat Dowling. Owner 

T. J. Stanton, Production Ray Lockert, Cutting 

Services: Industrial job training, public and 

civic relations, educational and theatrical motion 

pictures and slidefilms. 

Facilities: Equipment for production of sound 
and color motion pictures and slidefilms; art 
department and creative staff. 



( CONTIM 11) 



)\ the follow INC !■ \C. E 1 



IM.i.i PKODIITION KEXIEVS 



LOS AIVGELES AltEA: 

Pat Dowling Pictures: continued 
RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: The Hawaiian Story I Ha- 
waiian Sugar Planters' Association): Your Red 
Feathered Friends (Honolulu Community 
Chest) ; When Your Shij) Conies In (Castle and 
Cooke Ltd.): Desert Whipping Post: Making 
Room jor Payload ( International Harvester Com- 
pany). 

Sound Slidefilm: Public Relations for Business 
and Professional People (syndicated suliject for 
direct sales). The Pioneer Fire Room (educa- 
tional filmstrip. silent). 



Dudley Pictures Corporation 
AND Dudley Television Corporation 

9908 Santa Monica Boulevard 
Beverly Hills, California 

Phone: CRestview 1-7258 

Cable address: Dudleypic 

Date of Organization: 1947 
Dudley Television Corporation: 1951 

Branch Office : 501 Madison Avenue 

New York, N. Y. Phone: ELdorado 5-1076 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

Carl W. Dudley, President 

Don McNamara, Vice President 

Herman Boxer, Vice President 

Eugene H. Barnes. Secretary and Treasurer 

Writers: James Bloodworth, Charles Tedford, 

David Chandler, Carl Dudley, Herman Boxer 

Directors: Will Jason. Harvey Dwight. Alan 
Miner. Richard Evans. Richard Carlson, Herman 

Boxer, Arthur Pierson and Carl Dudley 
Services: Industrial, theatrical, educational and 
television motion pictures and slidefilnis. 
Facilities: Own studio, stage, lights, cutting 
room, sound and color production equipment, 
cameras, printing: color film library; creative 
staff. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Motion Pictures: Japan Reborn (California- 
Texas Oil); Seeing Is Believing (Martin Mo- 
tors) ; Flight to Ceylon; Flight to Singapore 
(TWA) ; Super-Chief (Santa Fe) : The Nickel 
Plate Story (Nickel Plate Railroad) : The Tenth 
Man (Union Pacific): More Profit Per Acre 
(Am. Jersey Cattle Clubs) : In War and Peace 
(Southwestern Public Service) ; Highways and 
Byways, U.S.A. I Farm Roads Foundation) ; The 
Magic Stone (Great Lakes Carbon Corp.) The 
Story Behind a Symbol (Assn. of American Rail- 
roads): Washington. Capitol City (Capitol Air- 
lines) : Mr. Lincoln Goes to Gettysburg (Western 
Maryland Railroad) : and others. 



Jerry Fairbanks Productions 

6052 Sunset Boulevard 

Hollywood 28. California 

Phone: HUdson 2-1101 

Date of Organization: 1929 

Branch: 520 North .Michigan Ave.. Chicago, 111. 

F. McHugh. representative. 



Jerry Fairbanks Proitiutions: continued 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

Jerry Fairbanks, President, Exec. Prod. 

Donald A. Dewar. I'ire President. Bus. Mgr. 

Raoul Pagel. Studio Production Mgr. 

Robert Scrivner. Client Relations. location Mgr. 

Leo Rosencrans, Story and Creative Head 
Services: Industrial, theatrical and television 
motion pictures. 

Facilities: 18 camera units: 16mm and 35mm 
sound recording; Multicam process; editing; 
animation: 16mm and .35nim optics; Duoplane 
process: film and music libraries; art and cre- 
ative staffs. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Motion Pictures: .America for Me (Grey- 
hound) ; The Magic Wheel (National Cash Reg- 
ister Co.) : All This and Beauty Too (Chrysler 
Corp.) ; The McGurk Way (Fruehauf Co.) ; Serv- 
ing Truckers Is Our Business (Firestone Tire 
& Rubber Cn.l. 



The George Fox Organization 

6671 Sunset Boulevard 

Hollywood 28, California 

Phones: Administration: Hillside 2242 

Production: GLadstone 2435 

Studio: HOUywood 9-2895 

Editing and Laboratory: HOUywood 9-1441 

Date of Organization: 1935 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

George S. Fox. President 

R. L. Fox, Secretary 

D. R. Fox, Vice President 

D. Rothenberg. Service Manager 

Justin Wenner. Sales Manager 
Russ Dyeson, Director, Animation 
.Services: Production organization and service 
on industrial, television, theatrical, and anima- 
tion films. 

Facilities: Mitchell camera equipment: tape 
and film recording; dubbing rooms; music scor- 
ing rooms; 6,000 square feet production stage, 
standing sets: editing, art. and script depart- 
ments; animation art and production. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Motion Pictures: Weekly sales promotion pro- 
duction for Los Angeles Times; The Easy Way 
Smokey Says; (Forestry Dept. State of Califor- 
nia): Final Impression (PIA of California^: 
Your Vote (California Republicans). 

Graphic Films Corporation 

(Associated with Photo & Sound Productions, 

San Francisco) 

1618 North Las Palmas Ave., 

Hollywood 28, California 

Phone: GRanite 2191 

Address of Photo & Sound Productions: 

116 Natonia St.. San Francisco 5, Cal. 

Phone: YUkon 2-3166 

Date of Organization: 1941 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

Lester Novros. President 

Julius Berle. Secretary Treasurer 

Noel Leigh-Taylor, Sales Representative, 



Graphii- Films: ciinliniiiil 
Services: Production of animated and live- 
action films for industry, govenniienl and 
.schools. 

Facilities: Animation department including 
stand for 16mm and 35mm: Bell & Howell .stand- 
ard: 35mm cameras: 16mm Cine-Special. Cut- 
ting and screening rooms. Permanent staff. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Sound Slidefilms: A Utile Light on Windows 
^Reynolds Metals Co. I : Meet Bill Doe; Make 
Mine Motor Oil; Battle of Wear; Your Ad- 
vertising Support (I'nion Oil Co. of California) ; 
Oil Taxes (Western Oil and Gas Association). 
Animation Sequences: for Yardstick for To- 
morrow'; Inflation (Encyclopaedia Britannica 
Films) ; special consultants on Air Force re- 
search projects through the T'liiversity of South- 
ern California. 



George Halligan 

7934 Santa Monica Boulevard 

Hollvwood. Calif. 

Phone: HOUywood 9-7962 

Date of Organization: 1945 

.Subcontract service on industrial, educational or 
television films onlv. No studio facilities. 



Paul Hoefler Productions 

7934 Santa Monica Boulevard 

Los Angeles 46. California 

Phone: HOUywood 9-2001 

Date of Organization: 1939 

Branch: 201 Linwood Ave.. Canton, Ohio. 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

Paul L. Hoefler. President 

E. M. Bennett. Vice President 

Rub\ Newstrand. Secretary-Treasurer 

Services: all types of 35mm and 16mm color- 
sound films on a world-wide basis. 
Facilities: camera equipment (Mitchell. Bell & 
Howell) : sound truck; studio lighting. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Arizona, Land of Color & 
Contrast (Standard Oil of California) ; .African 
Voyage ( Farrell Steamship Lines) : The Tuna 
Story ( Westgate-Sun Harbor Co.) : plus two films 
for direct sales: South .Africa; Victoria Falls. 
The Smoke Thai Thunders. 



The Jam Handy Organization 

The Jam Handy Organization, Inc., 7046 
Hollywood Boulevard, Los Angeles 28, Cali- 
fornia. Phone: HEmpstead 5809. (Service 
office, not sales.) 
(see complete listing under Detroit. Mich.) 



McAlpin Productions 

4063 Radford Avenue 

North Hollvwood. California 

Phone: SUnset 3-5826 

Date of Organization: 1948 

(see listing of Cal Pic in San Francisco) 

(CONTINUED ON FOLLOWING PAGE 88) 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



NOW 



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fihn inipai't. 

Inirslifinle what we are doing for 
<i.) h-ailing organizations... (/I'sroier 
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'HOW TO 


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Three of 

the more than 125 
Association Films' 
Pace-Setters 



Firotoiir's 

"LIBERIA-AFRICA'S ONLY REPUBLIC" 




(ircxl nd"- 

"SHORTEST WAY HOME" 



ASSOCIATION FILMS, INC 



liiiii ii II s I- orcimisl Dislrihiilor <>j Iniliistrinl liliiis 
llca<l<|iiarters: ."ilT ^lailison Vveiiin'. New ^ \»rk 17. >. V. 
Hrnitrhvs: Ridfif'ju'ld. \.J.. Chirafii). Sun /•'rnnrisro. Dallas 



19 3 3 P R O I) I C T I O .\ R K \ I E 1 



jy cj iik*iL_a 



LOS AI\GELES 



Mercury International Pictures. Inc. 

6611 Saiila Moiii.a HoiilovanI 
IlollvHoocI :«i. California 
Phoiu-: (;i,a.l.s|oiic 11(11 

Dale of Organization; 1948 

Branch: 251 F,. Grand Ave.. Chicago 11. Illinois. 

Phone: PElaware 7-3'XM. (Tempo. Inc.) 

OFFICER.'^ AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

V. E. Ellsworth. President 

David L. Monahan. Vice President 

G. C. Cable. Secretary 

Robert W. Larson. Production Head 

Marv O. Eastus. General Manager 

Service.s: Creation and production of motion 

pictures. TV commercials, and sound slidefilms 

for industry, public and civic relations: sales. 

sales training, product promotion, etc. Script 

to finished film. 16nnn and 35mm color and 

b/w. 

Facilities: Studio, sound stage: 16mni and 
35mm Mitchells and 16mm Cine Special cam- 
eras: arc and incandescent illumination, grip, 
interior and exterior production: 16min and 
35mm projection: projection and rehearsal 
rooms: scene design and set construction: art 
department: story boards, mockups. miniatures 
and special effects. Fully equipped cutting rooms, 
dressing and makeup rooms: adjoining mixing 
booth, commentators" booth: 35mm sound rec- 
ording. Still department. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: By An Emperor's Quili 
(Western Beet Sugar Producers) : Climate As 
You Like It (Insulation Board Institute) : Arosa 
Ski Holiday ( Henke Ski Boots-Specialty Import- 
ers, Inc. ) : The Hoffman Story — 1952 ( Hoffman 
Radio Corporation): Meet John Gardner (Rose 
Hills Memorial Park Assn.): Winter In The 
Sun (Big Bear Lake. Calif.). 

Sound Slidefilms: 4 sales subjects for Hoffman 
Radio Corp. 

Television: Hollywood Guest Stars (Mike Sto- 
key). Sponsor: Elgin American and Cerlina 
Watches. 85 TV spot commercials for Interstate 
Bakeries. Inc.: 11 TV spots for Hoffman Radio 
Corp. 



New World Productions 

5746 Sunset Boulevard 

Hollywood, California 

Phone: HOlIywood 9-5827 

Date of Organization: 1939 

Branches: 224 N. Glenwood Street, Peoria. 

Illinois. 49 W. 12th. New York, N. Y., Statler 

Bldg., Boston, Mass. 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

T. C. Robinson, in Charge oj Production 

Tommy Atkins, Production Manager 

Michael Road. Director 

Phil Robinson. Director 



.Vcic IVorld Pntditclion.s: continued 
Art Scott. Animation Director 
.Sterling Barnett. Head Cameraman 
Ed. Hairo. Editor 
Services: Industrial, educational and television 
motion pictures. 16mm and 35mm sound and 
color; live action and animated cartoon films. 
Facilities: Camera and lighting equipment; ani- 
mation department: creative staff. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Motion Pictures: Heritage (Anti-Defamation 
League. Catholic Youth Organization. United 
Christian Youth Movement): Balance of refer- 
ences on television only: The Pe/sgy OWeil Show 
(15 minute. t»ice weekly program I : What Do 
You Know? (15 minute, weekly): The Happy 
Hunters (half-hour programs). Special music 
production for 17 Ford Theatre programs. 



Polaris Pictures, Inc. 

5859 W. Third Street 

Los Angeles 36, California 

Phones: York 8058 and WEbster 34608 

Date of Organization: 1946 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

Juan C. Hutchison. President, General Manager 

Perry King. I ice President, Executive Producer 

Art Scott, Animation Producer 

Jack Johnston, Camera 

Harris Gable, Script 

Services: Animation, titles, sound recording 
(magnetic) sound printing. Complete facilities 
for production. 

Facilities: Animation stand (heavy duty 35mm- 
16mm). Cameras (Reeves. Mitchell. Bell & How- 
ell. Cine Specials), lights, magnetic sound 
(17'^mm). location trucks, grip equipment. 
RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Motion Pictures: We Call It Big Creek (South- 
ern Calif. Edison Company) : Flight Through In- 
strumeiit-seTies (U. S. Navy); Nitchi Tikoni (El 
Paso Natural Gas Co.); Rust (Richfield Oil 
Corp.): Let's Have Safe Healing and Home 
Made Climate (Southern California and South- 
ern Counties Gas Co. ) . 



Reid Ray Television Productions, Inc. 

8762 Holloway Drive 
Los Angeles, California 

Phone: CRestview 1-4080 

(See Complete listing under St. Paul, Minn.) 



Roland Reed Productions, Inc. 

275 So. Beverly Drive 

Beverly Hills, California 

Phone: CRestview 6-1101 

Date of Organization: 1932 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

Roland D. Reed, President 

Guy V. Thayer, Jr., Vice President 

Hazel Hall, Director 

Walter Strenge, Director of Photography 

Roy Luby, Editorial Supervisor 



Roland Reed Productions: continued 
Services: Sponsored training, public relations, 
consumer sales and religious films; television 
commercials and features. 

Facilities: Major studio equipment and tech- 
nicians: creative staff. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Motion Pictures: Ellis in Freedomland (West- 
inghouse Electric Corp.). 

Television: Weekly programs for Trouble with 
Father (General Mills. Inc.); Beulah Show 
(Proctor & Gamble): Mystery Theatre (Ster- 
ling Drug Company) ; My Little Margie (Philip 
Morris I: Rocky Jones — .S/xice Ranger. 



Frederick K. Rockett Company 

6063 Sunset Boulevard 

Hollywood 28, California 

Phone: Hillside 3183 

Date of Organization: 1924 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

Frederick K. Rockett, General Manager 

Alfred King. Production Head 

Eric Strutt, Editorial 

James Conley, Studio Superintendent 

Jay Adams. Camera Department Chief 

Services: Industrial motion pictures, slidefilms 

and television programs and commercials, 16mm 

and 35mm. 

Facilities: Studio with camera and sound re- 
cording equipment; sound stage; standing sets, 
lighting and electrical equipment, animation and 
trick film apparatus; dressing rooms; cutting 
and projection rooms; wood and metal shops; 
location trucks; creative staff. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Motion Pictures: Oklahoma and Its Natural 
Resources (Sinclair Refining Company); A 
Town is Born ( Richfield Oil Corp. ) : Mickey's 
Big Chance (American Automobile Assn.): 
Thirty-Six Miles to Saugus ( Auto. Club of So. 
California ) : Building Construction ( U. S. 
Navy). 



Rocket Pictures, Inc. 

6108 Santa Monica Boulevard 

Hollywood 38, California 

Date of Organization: 1943 

Branches: 5809 Harvard Road, Detroit, Mich- 
igan; Phone: Tuxedo 2-7762; George Netschke. 
554 West Adams. Chicago. Illinois; FRanklin 2- 
7270: J. Harry Ebbert. 681 Market Street, San 
Francisco, Calif.. YUkon 2-3625: Harry G. 
Swift. 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 
J. Richard Westen, President, Gen. Mgr.. 

Production Head 
Harlow Wilcox, Executive V.P., Treas., 

Sales Head 

J. Harry Ebbert. Vice President. Eastern 

Sales Mgr. 

Kay Shaffer, Secretary 

Parker Stough. V. P. Cliarge of Sales 

Courtney Anderson. Creative Director 

Don Bartelli, Production Manager 



28 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



Htxkrl I'liliirm: kiiiiiiiiiiiI 

SeRVICKs: 0>iins<-liir>. anil produtrrs of indus- 
(rial, sales and personnrl (raining motion pic- 
tures, slidefilnis and television programs. 

Facilities: Shooting stages; 16iimi and 33nmi 
v>und recording: animation department and 
artists: creative staff; afliliated with laboratories 
ised by major studios. 

RECE.NT PRODICTIONS AND SPONSOR.*; 
Motion I'ktires: DiHUmentary for I Santa Bar- 
bara ChandKT of Coinniercc I . 
SoLNU Sl.ll>KKlI.M Pkocrams: Retail Personnel 
Human Relations anil Career Training, I Rexall 
l>rug l.'iim|>anv I ; I'lihlir Relations Consumer 
t.ilut-ation i I'rudenlial Life Insurance Co. i: 
distributor. Dealer anti Consumer Proiluet Sell- 
infi iMrCulliH'b Motors Corp. I ; Bank Personnel 
Training i Bank of America I : Product Sellinf; 
Program i Roln-rts Companv I : Sales Personnel 
Development Serie\ i I\ii ifir Miilii.il I.lfr In«ur- 
drier (JiMlpain > 



John Sitheri-and PH()i>it:Tio.Ns. I.nc. 

201 No. «)c.idenlal Boiilevar.l 
fx)s Anpeles 26, (California 

Phone: Dlnkirk 8-.".l21 

Dale of Organi/atiun: 1943 

Branch: 60 K. t2nd Street. New York 17. \. Y. 

Phone: Ml rrav dill T-TJilo. In Chicago: rontaci 

lioss Sutherland. Ambassador West Hotel. 

OKnCEKS .\ND IIEI'ARTMENT HEADS 

John E. Sutherland. President, Gen. Mpr., Writer 

Ross M. .Sutherland. Exec. I ice I'res. 

& Secretary-Treasurer 

True Boardman, Writer and Director 

George Cordon, Associate Prtxlucer. Animation 

Roger M. Andrews. Production Mgr. 

Charles K. Bordwdl. Editorial Supervisor 

>krvi(;f.s: Complete production of live-action 

and animation filnv.- from research ami siript 

through relea.v printing. 

l-Aill.lTlfs: Studio, ofliie buihiings and other 
buildings to house the following: Animation unit 
complete through camera: ."sound stage, flats, 
electrical equipment, mill and e<|uipment, paint 
shop, etc.: rutting rooms. i-ompleleU ii|uip|ie<l: 
projection iheaire e<|uip|M'd bir both .{.Smm and 
U>min. 

RECENT PRODICTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Motion Pi< TI HF_s: Main Street Merchant ij. <!. 
I'ennev Co., Inc.): H hat Makes Is Tick i New 
York .*<tiMk Kxihangel ; Take a Look at Tonior- 
rou (Kais<-r Aluminum & (Chem. Corpl; Meet- 
in/! the Challen/te By If ay oj Ex/ierienre i N«- 
liimal ('arbon (Co.l: "A" Is for Atom (Onrral 
Kleclric Conifianv • : ITeVr An Odd Lot I Carlisle 
\ Jari|urlinl. 18 Technicolor Minute Movies for 
(n-neral Kl<-<iric ('omfianv anil 16 Te«hnico|or 
Minute Movies for (>os|ev Div. of Vvro Mfg. 
Corp. 

Ielevision Commkri mi.s ytm: Kroger (Coffee 
(onipanv, Wilson & (Co., (Crosley Division, (>ruen 
\X ntch (Ciimpanv. 



l>OS .\.\(.KI.KS .%IIKA: 



TkI.KHI.M. IxoHfOHAlKU 
MI3<) llollvwood lioulevar.l 
llollvwooil 28. California 
Phone: lit )|lv wood <)-T2<).^ 

Date, of Urgani/ation: 1938. (California: 

l<»4<i. New York 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADs 

Joseph A. Thomas, President & Cen'l. Mpr. 

Peter (Coinandini, Executive Proilurer, 

Secretary -Treasurer 

l>..i..r (Moga. 1 . /'.. Sound DejMrlment Chief 

Don llarrold. Production Manager 

Services: Complete studio and production 6er^■- 
ices in 16inm color and b&w for advertising, 
training and television entertainment films. 
1''aciutii:s: 16mm and 33mni cameras; sound 
stage, recording, dubbing, magnetic and sound 
on film; disc music library: laboratory priHess- 
ing negative, positive, reversal; color duplicat- 
ing; animation; title press; editing; story boards, 
creative staff. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
.Motion Pi<tihk.><: Roving Camera (6.S epi- 
sodes for TV I : Lumber I l^bor Management 
Hoard I: Cuntex Story I Hart i Hums I: Hard- 
unlcr-Household Suindler I Soft Mater As,«n. I : 
Airbrasive iS. S. White Co. I. 
T\' CnMMKRClAUS FOR: Sunkist. Stokely Froz- 
cfi F'oods. General Petroleum, Cresta Rlanca. 
NlUC Television. Pontiac Automnbile-. 

TkI.KIMX C.OKIMH VI ION 

l.-,l.-> N. W.-lrrn \viini.- 

l»s An;;ele- 27. (Calif. 

Phone: llilbiilc 73<)l 

Dale of ()r;:aiii/ation: l<)4» 

Hkvncm: I.S.S K. Ohio Street, Chi(agi> 11. III. 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

Rolierl P. Newman, Presitleni 

Dick l^-wis, }' ice-President 

>FKM<.Ks: Television and iiidu.strial pictures, 
slidefilms. 

Facii.itie.s: Full motion picture production fa- 
cilities: animation department, shooting stage, 
cutting rooms, stage .SOx'I.S. 2 cutting rooms. 6 
inter-locked magnetic 35mm or 17mm sound 
channel, 2 Moviolas, cameras, lights, sound 
truck, projection room with .ISmm and 16mm 
projectors. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SI*ONSORS 
Motion Pi<.tirf.s: Story of Dednox (Spring 
Packing (Corp. i; You Can Do It Better With 
Gas I.American Gas Ason.l; The Burner Test 
iMacmillan Oil Co.*. 

S4II Ni> Sl.IltFFll.M.s: Cashing in on (Courtesy i III. 
Hell Telephone (Companv I ; .Serrior Film (Sears. 
RiK-buik & (Co. I. 

TV (CoMXilHi.lAt.s FOR: Friskie Dog FoihI. Mis- 
sion Ib-ll Wine. Hammonil Organ. ItolliM-k's 
Drparlinent Store. \li..i..ii IVik 

* * * HohUace stars ap|>earing over listings 
indicate ilispUv advertising elsrwhere in this 



Wilding Pirlure ProiluelioiM, Inc. 
WiLDi.NC Pictlri; Productio.ns, Inc., 5981 Ven- 
ice Boulevard. Holly woimI, California, Phone: 
WFbster 01)13. John Oser, branch manager. 
(Studio, stage facilities and screening rooms 
besides administrative offices.) 
fsee complete listing under Chicago. 111.) 



Kaphaki. (i. W (ii.FK Stldios 

.'>631 Hollvwood Boulevard 

ilollywoud 28, (California 

Phone: (iKanite 6126 

Date uf Organization: 1930 

\vTIO\AL RKI-RKSOTATIVtS 

\k\v ^oHk: Dicran Nahigian. .3.30 Park Avenue. 

Phone: PUza .S-.>31«i. 
ClIlcAco: (Carl Webster, 2103 Orringlon .Avenue, 

Kvanston. 111. Phone: DAvis »-72:i6. 
Dftroit: Harold R. Trov. lfrf{52 Mevers Road. 
Phone: Diamond l-06>(. 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT Ut-ADS 

Raphael G. Wolff, Ouner, Executive Chairman 

(ieralil K. Butterworth. Comptroller 

MacDonald MacPherson, Executiie Director. 

Creative Department 

Arthur W. Treutelaar, Exec. Studio Supervisor 

David l.urie. Exec, Editorial Department 

James Moore, Exec. Director, .inimalion 

Sally A.ssin, Executive Secretary 

O. Gail Papineau, Supervisor, Director 

\im Munsey, Supervisor, Director 

Servk t;i: Industrial, training and institutional 
motion pictures, sound and color: television pro- 
grams and commercials. 

Faciuti£S: Stages ami general prtMluction equip- 
ment: mobile generator units and e<|uipment for 
location work: permanent staff of editing, ani- 
mation, music and creative |>ers<innel. Stereo 
motion picture camera and (lersonnel for ihm-- 
ilimensional films. 

RECENT PRODICTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Piitihis; Piercing the Inkrutwn • In- 
ternational Business Machines (Corporation): 
The Canned Meat Story (American (Can Com- 
|>any ' : Freedom and PoH-er ((ieneral FClectrii 
(Com|>anv I : Starring in St\le (Chrysler Cor- 
poration ) : lust Like Magic ( Kelv inator Div i- 
sion of Nash-Kelv inator (Cor|»>ralionl : Contact' 
(Cannon F.ln-tric (Coiiquinv ) : All But a feu 
(ShriiiersI; Lightning Masters i Oneral FJrr- 
trie (Coin)>anv ) : Mmiern Packaging in the C.iliut 
Industry i Fourijrinirr Kraft': and others. 



\ Hcfereme (Miiile In I'rixlui-tiiiii 

♦ I he liim- ji'lril umlrr jir.Mliner ie(ei. r 
these |Uigi« l«ll ihr •lorv of earh ronip.i' 
dividual talents. < tin k ihe pit lures an. I v 
s|>ons<irs as a sound appr»«< h to giMMl hhii buv- 
manship. This is \itur aulhorilalite Buver'* 
(•uiiie: ujr it «l«rlt and wrll. 



I «'. I !■ K I) II I ( T I <) N H K \ I K « 



A» n #M. Af m 



PACIFIC NORTHWEST 



Oregon 

Leonard Delano Studios 

(Western Colorfilms) 

1536 S.E. Eleventh Avenue 

Portland 14, Oregon 

Phone: EMpire 2139 

Date of Organization: 1937 

Leonard H. Delano, Owner-Manager 

(Reference details on recent productions & 
sponsors not submitted.) 



Northwest Motion Pictures 

1716 Thirtieth Avenue West 
Seattle 99, Washington 
Phone: GArfield 6391 
Date of Organization: 1927 
OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 
Ray Paulsen, President 
Edna C. Paulsen, Vice President 
Services: Industrial, agricultural, training and 
public relations films. Animated and instruction- 
al films. 

Fa<:ilities: Bell & Howell Cameras. 35nun and 
16nini. Dual recording, dubbing and music, sets. 
complete laboratory processing, printing, etc. 

RECENT productions AND SPONSORS 
Motion Pictures: Tuo-Way Street (Facilities 
Series! and Tuo-Way Street (Market Series) 
(Washington CoOp Farmers Assn.) ; Pacific 
Poller (Pacific Power and Light Co.) ; Co-pro- 
ducer of Malformations of the Heart — Part 2 
(University of Washington I : Co-producer of 
Packaged Cargo (Howard Staples & Associates). 

Photo-Art Commercial Studios 

420 S.W. Washington Street 

Portland, Oregon 

Phone: BR 5411 
Founded 1925: Not Incorporated 
OFHCERS and department HEADS 
Claude F. Palmer, Owner and Manager 
Stivers W. Vernon, Assistant Manager 
Services: Production typical of area require- 
ments, i.e.. agricultural, recreational and indus- 
trial subjects. 

Facilities: Equipment and personnel for "pack- 
age" productions or specialized services in 
sound, photographic and laboratory fields: prov- 
en still photography methods apphed to motion 
j)irture production. 

RECENT productions AND SPONSORS 
MoTlox PlcTl res: Story of Coos Bay Lumber 
Co. (Coos Bay Lumber C.u.i : Portland, the City 
oj Roses (Standard Oil of California I: Your 
United Fund ( PnrtlaTid I nited Fundi. 



Apply for Listing In These Pages 

* New and capable production companies desir- 
ing listings in these pages are invited to write for 
listing forms and specific rules for listing ac- 
ceptance. 



Washinglon 

Kvhk; Motio.n Picture Company 
5514 University Way 
Seattle 5, Washington 

Phones: KEnwood 7400, 7401 
and VErmont 6888 

Date of Organization: 1935 
Incorporation: 1946 

officers and department heads 

Max H. Rarig. President and Executive T'roduc 

Grace Turner. Vice President 

James Lawless. Account Executive 

Ralph I mbarger. Production Manager 

John Dubuque. Chief .'>ound Technician 



Skuvk i:s: Coiiipl( Ic |inidiicli()iis. industrial, job 
training, safety, sales, educational, medical mo- 
tion j)iclures: TV programs and spots, institu- 
tional films. Custom editing, sound and pho- 
lograpliy for other producers. 
FuMUTiEs: 16mm R&H Specialist. B&H-7II. 4()(l' 
magazines, blimps, svnc motors. Westrex 16mni 
Magnetic Recorder: mixing, recording and dub- 
bing studio. Research and writing and distribu- 
tion of films. Lighting and location equipment. 

RECENT productions AND SPONSORS 
Motion Pictures: Seaborne Cargo (Weyer- 
haeuser Steamship Company I : The Enemy is 
Fire (Washington & Oregon Forest Fire Assn. I : 
African Safari (Frederick & Nelson) : Classroom 
in the Cascades (Washington State Department 
of Education!; Hauling Logs (Loggers Assn.). 



^ □ ut^ ri 



CANADA 



Ashley & Crippen Limited 
196 Bloor Street West 

Toronto, Ontario 

Phone: Klngsdale 7904 

Date of Organization: 1942 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 
Dan Gibson, President 

W. R. Gibson & W. H. Gibson, . 
Vice Presidents 

G- J. Campbell, Secty.-Treas., Gen. Mgr. 
Joel Aldred. Sales Mgr. & Creative Dir. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

(Reference details on recent productions & 
sponsors not submitted.) 



Associated Screen NEVt's Ltd. 

2000 Northcliffe Avenue 

Montreal, Quebec 

Phone: DExter 1186 

Branches: Vancouver, Winnipeg, Toronto 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

B. E. Norrish, President. Managing-Director 

W. J. Singleton, General Manager 

L. R. Avery, Secretary-Treasurer 

Maurice Metzger, Tech. Sup'r. 

J. W. Campbell, Com'l. Prod. Mgr. 

Gordon Sparling. Short Subjects 

Eleanore Dunne, Art Director 

Services: 16mm and 35mm industrial, sales 
and educational motion pictures and slidefilms. 

Facilities: Sound recording, titles, animation; 
laboratory. Ansco Color laboratory — 16 & 35mm. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Beauharnois (Quebec Hydro 
Electric Commission ! : Highlights of the Inter- 
national Golf Rules (The House of Seagram); 
T.C.A. S45 (Trans-Canada Air Lines): Steel 
for Canadians (The Steel Company of Canada 
Limited I ; Finest from the First ( Massey-Har- 
ris Company Limited ! : Lne des Menteilles du 



Monde Amelioree ( Dufresne Engineering) : 
The Power to Grow (Consolidated Mining. 
Smelting & Power Co. I : Fiindy Holiday (Na- 
tional Parks of Canada ! : That Man May Fly 
(Canadian Pacific Airlines Ltd.): The Golden 
Leaf ( Imperial Tobacco Co. of Canada Ltd.) : 
Canadian Pattern (Canadian Pacific Railway 
Companv! : Construction of Canada's First Sub- 
way (Toronto Transportation Commission). 
Sound Slidefilms: Automotive Electricity, 
Parts /. //. /// and 11 and The Electric Shift 
Control (Ford Motor Company of Canadal : 
Careers in Canadian Pharmacy (Canadian Phar- 
maceutical Assn.) ; Careers in Canadian Den- 
tistry fCanadian Dental Assn.) ; The Know-How 
of Trading Tires (Firestone Tire & Rubber Co. 
of Canada) ; The Tea Industry (Tea Bureau) . 



Capitol FiuiM PRODut;TioNS 

1640 The Queensway 

Phones: Rodney 4131-2, Clifford 1-5291 

Toronto, Ontario 

Date of Organization: 1945 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

Edward L. Harris. President 

Frank Shuster. Vice President 

Johnny Wayne. Vice President 

Frank E. O'Byrne. General Manager 

Norman Gunn. Lab. .Supt. 

Henry Slagter. Camera Dept. 

Services: Modern studio equipped to handle all 

types of motion picture production (16mm or 

35mm ! . sound and color. 

Facilities: Main studio space 75x50x20: 35mm 
and 16mm Mitchell cameras: Western Electric 
Recording System (35mm and 16mm I: Stancil- 
Hoffman Magnetic Tape Recorder (17.5) Mole- 
Richardson Mike boom: Lighting equipment, 
etc. 16nun printing and processing (17.5). 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
.MoTio.N Pictures: Hoiv to Start the Day Right. 
LeMatin D'Une Importante Joule (Bank of Can- 
ada-theatrical I : Embouteillage (General Motors 
of Canada ) ; Essomalic I English version and 
French version) (Imperial Oil Limited). 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



Crawley Films. Limited 

19 Fairmont Avenue 

Ottawa, Ontario 

Phone 8-1285 

Date of Organization: 1939 

Branch Offices: 21 Dundas Square. Toronto. 

Phone: KMpire 4-52t!;5. 1467 MansficM St.. 

.\hintreal. Phone: H.-Vrbour 1356. 

OFFICERS .\ND DEPARTMENT HEAD.S 

F. R. Crawley. C.A., President, General Manager 

Graeme Fraser, Assistant General Manager 

Stewart Reburn, Mgr. Toronto Office 

-Masdair Fraser, Mgr. Montreal Office 

Quenlin Brown. Prod. .Mgr. 

Senior Producers: George Gorman, Peter Cock, 

Stanh'v Moore. Jean-Pierre Renecal 

Gerry Kedey. Business Manager 

Tom Glynn, Camera Department Head 

Rod Sparks. Sound Department Chief 

Kenneth Gay, Art and Animation 

Munroe Scott. Script Department 

William McCauley. Dir. of Music 

Knhcrl McMonagle. Production Secretary 

Irving Dooh. Commercial Still Division 

William O'Farrell. Laboratory 

Earl Valley. Equipment Sales Mgr. 

Servicks: Motion pictures and slidefilms for 
Canadian and United Stales industry. Govern- 
ment, education and television: sounding, edit- 
ing, animation, and printing for smaller pro- 
ducers, independent cameramen, seven provin- 
cial governments and other organizations from 
coast to coast. Produced 53 films in 1952. 
F.^CILITIES: Sound stage: cameras — Maurer.s. 
Cine-Specials. Bell S Howell. .Arriflex and 
Kyemo: hlimps. dollies: 250.000 watts of light- 
ing equipment with mobile generator: Western 
Klectric 35nnn recording system. Maurer 16mm 
recording equipment and six mixing channels. 3 
Rangertone synchronous magnetic tape record- 
ers. Magnecorder with sync head. 16mm and 
35nim dubbers. turntables, disc recorders: 16mm 
printers and processing equipment: animation 
department; stills department: extensive casting 
file: music library: script department with re- 
search library. Electronic service department. 
Equipment sales division. Permanent staff of 
63. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: More Food for More Mil- 
lions (Canadian Industries Ltd.): By Map and 
Compass (Silva Inc. of Sweden): Big Four 
Football Highlights of 1952. lO'Keefe's Brew- 
ery): Sinetvs of Industry (Canada Wire and 
Cable): 25 Under Par (Seagram's): Roger- 
stone (Northern Aluminum Ltd. of England): 
Travellers' Cheques ( Canadian Travel Bureau) : 
Immediate Action (Toronto Stock Exchange): 
Power Digs In (Trans-Northern Pipeline Co.): 
Liquid Beauty (Sherwin-Williams): Terre 
^euve (Imperial Oil I : Chemical Brush (Control 
I Green Cross Insecticides); Frustrating Fours 
and Fa.':cinating Fives ) Dept. of Health and Wel- 
fare) ; The Gasline (Union Gas Co.): Au Dela 
Des Ondes (Aluminum I,td.) Cent Pour-Cent 
( Molson's Brewery ) : llighnay nj the .llom 
(Northern Transportation Company); Under- 
ground 1129 (Imperial Oil) Canadian Royal 
I isit, Le Royal 22ieme Regiment ( Ueparlnient 
of National Defense) : Hon to Take Finger 



Craiclcy Films: continui'd 
Prints \ Royal Canadian Mounted PoliceJ ; .Veu' 
Horizons (Saskatchewan Government): Build- 
ing Bird Houses, Attracting Birds in Winter. 
Birds that Fat Fish, Birds that Eat Seeds. Birds 
that Eat Flesh. Birds that Eat Insects ( Interna- 
lii>nal Film Bureau. Chicago). 
SoLM) Slioefilms: Fish is Fine Food (Depart- 
iiient of Fisheries) : Annual Report (Marconi) ; 
Sales Training (B.V.D.). 



Omega Productions Inc. 

1960 Dorchester Street West 

Montreal, Quebec 

Phone: GLenview 3526 

Date of Organization: 1951 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

T. S. Morrisey, ['resident 

Pierre Harwood, Secretary-Treasurer 

Giles R. Gauthier, Sates & Adv. Manager 

Henry A. Michaud. Production Manager 

John R. Racine. Art & Animation Dir. 

John Burman. Chief Engineer 

Services: Educational, industrial, sales promo- 
tion, theatrical, and television motion pictures. 
Facilities: 16mm and 35mm cameras, tape and 
film recording equipment, projection and editing 
facilities, sound shooting stage, animation de- 
partment. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Motion Pictures: Higher Costs (The Bell Tele- 
phone Co.); They Are All Our Children, The 
Way to Success ( Province of Quebec I : The 
Search Continues I Canadian Industries Ltd. ) : 
Operation Buduorm (Canadian International 
Paper Co. I : Why Bradings i Can. Brew. Ltd.). 



Lew Parry Film Productions 

181 ^est Broadway 
Vancouver 10. B. C. 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

Llewelyn M. Parry. Managing Producer 

Lieut-Col. C.D.M. Kitchin. M.B.E., 

Associate-Producer 

C. V. Joy. Executive Secretary 

C. H. Powell. Manager Sound and 

Editorial Services 

Robert Reid, Mgr. Processing and Photography 
Louis Davidson. 5/or>- and Script Services 
M. Roozeboom, Art and Animation Director 

Services: Motion pictures for public relations, 
sales, education, and special services in produc- 
tion of engineering and technical records, both 
in still and motion studies. Television. Open-end 
entertainment programs and spot commercials. 
Facilities: Film studio and recording stage. 
Camera and lighting for 35nun and 16nun color. 
Full sound recording for studio and location 
work. B&W processing, and long established as- 
sociation with fine color labs in Hollywood, New 
York and Ea.stern Canada. Cutting rooms, staff 
writers, scenic department, costume facilities; 
model construction, animation and optical ef- 
fects: art and title production. 



Lfiv Parry Film Productions: continued 
RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Wahleach Power Project. 
Bridge River Power Project, Buntzen Power- 
house (B. C. Electric) ; Eyes West (35mm theat- 
rical release on industry ) : Canada Airborne 
(Trans-Canada .Air Lines): Granville Bridge 
(City of Vancouver Engineering Dept.): Who 
Me? ( Vancouver Traffic and Safety Council) : 
Power Line to Kitimat, Sechako Survey (Alu- 
minum Company of Canada) : Buckerfield's Fer- 
tilizers (James Lovick & Co.) : Namao (Marwell 
Construction Co.): Prelude to Kitimat (Alumi- 
num Co. of Canada); Trees for Tomorrow 
(MacMillan & Blocdel ) ; Gas Unlimited i West 
Coast Transmission Co. ). 



Peterson Productions 
337-9 King Street West 

Toronto 1. Ontario 

Phone: EMpire 8-7065 

Date of Organization: 1947 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

S. Dean Peterson, President 

L. L. Croniien. Director of Production 

William S. Turner. Technical Director 

Sydney Brown. Script Dept. Mgr. 

Services: Commercial, industrial and television 
commercials and programs. 

Facilities: Stage equipped for sound, editing 
rooms. 16nim and 35mm equipment. Provision 
is being made for another stage and additional 
rooms for cutting, make-up and offices. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Motion Pictures: ( In production now i Mutu- 
ally Yours (Drug Trading Co.) : Parkhill in tite 
Canadian Rockies (Canadian Parkhill Stringing 
Co.) : The Sarnia Opening (Canadian Oil Com- 
panies): three untitled pictures in production 
for (Ford Motor Co.): (Comslock Midwestern 
Ltd.): and ( Mannix Limited). Exclusive repre- 
sentatives of NBC-TV News and Special Events, 
in Canada. 



Vega Films 

770 St. .\ntoine Street 

Montreal, Quebec 

Phone: University 6-3295 

Date of Organization: 1946 

Alan Moorhouse, President 

Reginald V. Gillman, Vice President 

K. E. Samuelson, Scripts 

Services: Production of 16mm motion pictures 

and 35niin slidefilms. 

Facilities: 8,000 sq. ft. of studio and darkroom 
space; 40,000 watts lighting; photography, set 
building, cutting: sound recording acquired on 
contract: creative staff. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Motion Pictires: Canada's Pathway to Plenty 
(('anadian Chamber of l^ommcrce): Gradall 
I Warner & Swas*-) . Cleveland I : Coronary 
Thrombosis iSandoz Pharmaceuticals Ltd.): 
The Sphenoid Sinus (Chas. E. Frosst & Co. 
Ltd.): Continental Passage (for own account). 



I '):>:i IMio I) I ( r Id \ U F\ I FW 



istman and Ansco 

COLOR 



Duplicate Negatives 

New equipment and techniques developed during the 

past year by Cinema Research assure quality Eastman 

and Ansco color duplicate negatives. Write for prices 

and delivery schedules. 



tINEMA RESEARCH COlB 
H. A SCHEIB, PRESIDENT ^^H 

00 Romoine Slree^^M|y^^^8^a|i|^^H 
1 mumi^ 



OVER 7.000 BUSINESS EXECUTIVES REFER TO THESE PAGES 



Put a SELECTR05LIDE to work 




Let a Selcctroslido present your sales message — illus- 
trate your training program — dramatize your reports. 
It's operation is completely automatic, or can be operat- 
ed by remote control. 48 Slides in story-telling sequence 
repeat over and over when necessary. The superb 
1000-watt projector produces large brilliant images in 
the largest auditoriums. Completely portable, Selectro- 
slide is easy to operate, effective to use. Select the 
best — Selectroslide. 






SPinOliER & SHUPPE 

2201 BEVERLY BOULEVARD 
LOS ANGELES 4, CALIFORNIA 



Reference Shelf 



IM-ful C^it^ilogs and Refen-iK-.-s 
for III.' Musincss Film SpoiiM.i 

♦ Association Films. Inc. lias is- 
sued a fealurc-filin folder >»liiili 
describes more than 100 full length 
entertainment films available on 
rental lo schools, churches and other 
organizations. 

Among the newly-acquired sub- 
jects described are A Walk in the 
Sun, starring Dana Andrews: Dex- 
linalion Moon, a science-fiction ac- 
count of a trip into space, in Tech- 
nicolor: Pastor Hall, an account of 
a clergyman's resistance to tyran- 
ny: and Nanook oj the North, Rob- 
ert Flaherty's classic about Eskimo 
life. 

Write for your free copy to Asso- 
ciation Films. ?,S W. 45th St.. New 
York City 19. 

Swift Distributes Film Pamphlet 

♦ A colorful little pamphlet which 
describes six Swift & Company 
films is now being distributed by 
the Chicago meat packer. Lsing a 
■"staggered index.'" the pamphlet 
enables each title to be seen at a 
glance and gives a description of 
each film on a single page. Films 
described are Livestock and Meat: 
Cons and Chickens . . . U. S. A.: 
By-Products; A Nation's Meat: 
Meat Buying Customs: and W^ho 
Buys Your Livestock? Copies of 
the pamphlet are available upon re- 
quest from Swift & Co.. Agricul- 
tural Research. Union Stock Yards. 
Chicago 0. 111. 

Religious Film List Ready 

♦ The Religious Film Association 
has published a Tenth Anniversary 
edition of the RFA Guide to Films 
jor Church and Community Use. 
Features include descriptions and 
evaluations of over .300 motion pic- 
tures and 180 slidefilms. classifica- 
tion bv subject matter and articles 
on the use of visual equipment. 

The Guide has 96 pages and is 
available from the RFA. 220 Fifth 
A\enue. New York. 

City College Issues Film Catalog 

♦ ""See-Hear Mr. Businessman" is 
the title of a new catalog published 
bv the Audio-Visual Center of The 
City College of New York. It lists 
some 700 films available from one 
of the country's largest business 
training film libraries, which repre- 
sents an estimated .82.200.000 in 
production costs and contains films 
made for and by some of the na- 
liiin's biggest industrial organiza- 



liuii^. I he school's catalog is avail- 
.iMi- u|iiin request from City College 
Audio-Visual (ientrr. 17 Lexington 
Ave., New York 10. 



Distribution Potential Analyzed 
♦ Dv.NAMic FiLM.s. I.\(,.. has pre- 
pared a special report analyzing the 
audience potential available to in- 
dustrial film sponsors. It was orig- 
inally prepared for the company's 
clients, but now may be obtained 
On request, from Dynamic at 112 
West 89th Street. New "^ork. 

The twenty page report breaks 
down sponsored film audiences into 
major categories and explores ele- 
ments of each category, including 
case histories on various Dynamic- 
produced films. One section on tele- 
vision gives facts and figures on the 
dollar value of sponsored films that 
qualify for television time. 



Acmiola Literalure Now Available 
♦ Thk Acmiola Distributing 
Company, a division of SOS Cin- 
ema Suppl) Corp., 602 West 52nd 
Street. New York City 19. is offer- 
ing a new descriptive brochure and 
price list of the Acmiola line of 
film editing, viewing and sound 
producing machines. 



Modern's "Index and Guide" Lists 
Free Films for Plant Shows 

♦ The 195:-! edition of ""An Index 
and Guide to Free Educational and 
Classroom Films from Industry' is 
now available for free distribution 
to plant and office organizations on 
letterhead requests to Modern Talk- 
ing Picture Service. Inc.. 45 Rocke- 
feller Plaza. New York City 20. 

This 40-page illustrated publica- 
tion gives detailed descriptions of 
82 sound motion pictures distribut- 
ed by all of Modern"s 27 regional 
film exchanges: an additional II 
pictures are described for restricted 
distribution on a regional basis. A 
comprehensive title and subject mat- 
ter appendix details the special areas 
in which these films are applicable. 

54 of the 82 pictures with na- 
tional distribution are in color, in- 
cluding such notable titles as The 
\eif Paul Bunyan (Weyerhaeuser) : 
The DuPont Story i DuPont I : This 
h Lile I American Meat Institute!: 
The Clean Look I Armour I : Cheese 
Family Album (Kraft): and the 
timeless duo. Unfinished Rainbotvs 
and Curiosity Shop ( Aluminum Co. 
of America I . 

The ""Index"' is a good piece of 
reading for any film sponsor, as well 
as a primary source for employee 
audience fare. !^ 



BUSINESS SCREEN M.\GAZ1.NE 







After your picture is shot, how many different places 
will you go to complete production? 

By spreading it around, you not only slow down completion, but also divide responsibility 



• WORKPRINT 



IN COLOR, BLACK and White # fcUIIINC] 

REVERSAL FROM COLOR, REVERSAL FROM POSITIVE, 
POSITIVE FROM NEGATIVE 



FACILITIES AND PERSONNEL 



AND DUBBING, MAGNETIC, OPTICAL 



SCORING AND EFFECTS 



AND OTHER VOICE TALENTS 



IN COLOR OR BLACK AND WHITE 



• RECORDING 

• MATCHING & SPLICING 

A ond B ROLL PREPARATION 

^ I I I Lt^ INSERTS, ANIMATION 

HOT PRESS, HAND LETTERING, ART 



AND DISTRIBUTION SERVICE 



• MUSIC 

• NARRATOR 

• PRINTS 

• rKUJbvMUN INSPECTION AND MOUNTING • JnlrrlNll 

USE ONE OR ALU STUDIO LABORATORY & STAGE AT ONE ADDRESS 

Inquiries Invited . . . Cost Estimates Promptly Returned 

T€L€f ILM 

[ I IMCORPOWATED | 

6039 HOLLYWOOD BLVD. • Phone HOIIywood 9-7205 • HOLLYWOOD 28, CAIIFORNIA 



l'<.-, .1 I'Kll I) I c r Id N I! K \ 1 K» 



£ 



FFECTIVE 

SALES TRAINING 
AND PROMOTION 
FILMS 



Require that 
rare combination 



CREATIVE 

THINKING, 
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TECHNICAL 
PERFECTION IN 
PRODUCTION 



That's the secret 
of our SUCCESS 



INC 

254 WEST 54th STREET 
NEW YORK, 19, N. Y. 

COIumbus 5-7620 



Film Nomenclature 

Key Tfclinical Dt'fliiilions Giv<Mi 
in Aiiifrican Stamlards Hrocluin- 

WITH KII.M rapiHK heoming as .(.ni]!!..,, 
a denominator in business and tduca- 
lional conimunicalion as the printed 
(lafie las well as a mass entertainment medium 
via theatres and television), the urgent need for 
recognized standards of legal and professional 
terminology is being met by such organizations 
as the American Standards Association, aided 
b^■ special committees from the Society of Mo- 
tion Picture and Television Engineers as well 
as producer and laboratory organizations. 

The basic publication from which some of 
these terms are digested in these columns is 
the American Standards "Nomenclature for Mo- 
tion Picture Film Used in Studios and Process- 
ing Laboratories, revised in 1947. No. Z22.56- 
1947. The complete book may be obtained at 
only 50c per copy from the American Standards 
Association. Inc.. 70 E. 45th Street. New York 
17, N. Y. Some of the most significant definitions 
are as follows: 

1.1 Motion Picture Film. Motion picture film is 
a thin flexible ribbon of transparent material hav- 
ing perforations along one or both edges and 
bearing a sensitized layer or other coating ca- 
pable of producing photographic images. 

.Note: The term "film" may be applied to unexposed 
him, to exposed but unprocessed film, and to exposed 
and processed film. 

1.1.1 Raw Stock. Raw- stock is film which has 
not been exposed or processed. 

1.1.2 Film Base. Film base is the transparent 
or nearly transparent material upon which a pho- 
tographic emulsion is coated: namely, the sup- 
port for the emulsion in photographic film. 

Note: All 35-mm film is usually understood to be a 
flammable liase (nitrate), unless otherwise specified. 

1.1.2.1 Safety Base. Safety base is the slow 
burning film base used in motion picture film. 

Note: .\t the present time, safety base and acetate 
base are synonymous and 16-mm film manufactured in 
the United States is of this form. .Ml safety base must 
comply with American Standard Definition for Motion 
Picture Safely Film, Z22.31-1946. 

1.1.3 Film Perforations. Film perforations 
are the regularly and accurately spaced holes that 
are punched throughout the length of motion pic- 
ture film. These holes are engaged by the teeth of 
various sprockets and pins by which the film is 
propelled and positioned as it travels through 
cameras, processing machines, prjectors. and 
other film machinery. 

1.1.4 Fine Grain. Fine grain is the term used 
to designate film emulsions in which the grain 
size is smaller or finer than in the older type 
emulsions commonly employed prior to about 
1936. 

Note: This Icrni is relative as there is a wide varia- 
(ion in grain size among various fine-grain films. It is 
probable that the term will become obsolete when all 
film emulsions become fine grain. There is no inverse 
term such as coarse grain. 

1.3 Dupe iDupIicate) \egalive. A dupe (du- 
plicate) negative is a negative film that is pro- 
duced by printing from a positive. 

NoTK: A dupe negative is used for producing prints 
which are. in effect, duplicates of prints which niij;ht br- 
ntadf from the original negative. 

1.4 Image ( Photograpliic). An image is iwn 




.litai 



■t] UU: 



liln 



pl.olo.r.|.l,i. 
emulsion. 

1.4.1 Latent Imajie. A latent image is the in- 
visible image registered on a photographic emul- 
sion due to the reaction produced in the emulsion 
by exposure to light. 

Note: This image liecomes visible after development. 

1.4.2 Picture Image. A picture image is a 
photographically obtained likeness of any object 
on photographic film. 

1.4.3 Sound Image. .\ sound image is a pho- 
tographically obtained sound track or sound 
record. 

1.4.4 Negative Image. A negative image is a 
photographic image in which the values of light 
and shade of the original photographed subject 
are represented in inverse order. 

Note: In a negative image, light objects of the origi- 
nal subject are represented by high densities and dark 
objects are represented by low densities. 

1.4.5 Positive Image. A positive image is a 
photographic replica in which the values of light 
and shade of the original photographed subject 
are represented in their natural order. 

1.5 Sy nehronism. Synchronism is the relation 
between the picture and sound films with respect 
either to the physical location on the film or 
films, or to the tiine at which corresponding pic- 
ture and sound are seen and heard. 

1.5.1 .Projection Synchronism. Projection 
synchronism is the time relation between picture 
and corresponding sound in a projection print. 

Note: Correct projection synchronism is indicated by 
exact coincidence of picture and sound as seen and 
heard. To attain this result, it is necessary to place the 
sound track 20 frames ahead of the center of the corres- 
ponding picture for 35-mm film and 26 frames ahead of 
the center of the corresponding picture for 16-mm film, 
since sound motion picture projection equipment is de- 
signed for projection synchronism with this relationship 
existing between the locations of the projected picture 
and corresponding sound. 

(CONTINUED ON PACE Nl NETY-EIGHT ) 















(^EAffl) 






MOTION PICTURE 

AND 

TELEVISION ART 

Animation - Titles 

Sor "TTIotioM *?>icture 
'^roducerA 

240 EAST 39th ST. 
lExinjton 2-7378 





BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 




"WHAT'S YOUR TROUBLE?" 

A series of 26 fifteen minute television 

film programs for ttie Broadcasting and 

Film Commission of thie National Council 

of Cfiurcf)es of Christ in ttie U.S.A. 



DR. AND MRS. NORMAN VINCENT PEALE 



Ptjoduced i*t ou^ /itlci*tia Stu<iio4. 




BEELAND-KING FILM PRODUCTIONS 752 spring st , n.w • elgin 7558 • Atlanta, ga. 



1 '1.-, :i I- H II U I c I I (I N H K \ 1 KTS' 



In fhe ^ 



National Wildlife Federation Cites 
"Water Wilderness" for Excellence 

* A ncH 30-iinniili" loliir picture 
featuring EH Dodd. creator of 
■"Mark Trail." has heen named one 
of the outstanding outdoor films of 
1953 hy the National Wildlife Fed- 
eration — the first formal commen- 
dation e\er gi\en h\ the federation 
to a film nf this type. The subject is 
titled If aliT IT ih/erriess. 

Western Auto Supply Company 
of Kansas City, sponsors of the mo- 
tion picture, have announced that 
prints of Water Wilderness are nou 
available to clubs and organizations 
over the nation on a free loan basis. 

Announcement of the unusual 
award came in Washington. D. C. 
from Charles H. Callison. conser- 
vation director of the National 
Wildlife Federation. In making the 
award. Mr. Callison praised both 
Mr. Dodd and Western Auto. He 
said: 

"The National Wildlife Federa- 
tion of Washington, D. C. is proud 
to cite this motion picture as one of 
the outstanding outdoor film pres- 
entations of 195.'? and awards it the 
first formal commendation ever 
given by the federation to a film of 
this t\pe. 

"In it is depicted unique recrea- 
tion in one of our great national 
parks. Here in the Florida Ever- 
glades lies one of America's en- 
chanting wilderness areas — yours 
to enjoy — yours to preserve. The 
National Wildlife Federation con- 
gratulates Ed Dodd and the spon- 
sors." 

Water Wilderness, filmed in the 
mysterious Everglades, features Mr. 
Dodd in his quest for research ma- 
terial for use in current "Mark 
Trail" sequences. 

The film is ideal for club and 
other group showings. Western 
Auto officials said. It shows a va- 
riet> of fi.shing and wildlife inci- 
dent.s deep in the Everglades. Tar- 
pon, shark, gator, sting ray and 
other .sequences are all shown in 
full natural color. Prints of Water 
Wilderness for club showings are 
available on a loan basis — free of 
charge —to any organization in the 
nation from Western Auto Supph 
Company, 2107 Grand Avenue. 
Kansas City, Missouri. 



Santa Fe's "Sports of Southwest" 
Joins 'S3 Sports Film Parade 
* Interested in sports? The Santa 
Fe Railway has just released a 



^QCIIOK 



NEWS ABOUT FILMS AND PRODUCTION TECHNIQUES 



>piiMkiiig new film Sitorls uj the 
Southwest. It is a fast moving 18- 
minute camera journey along west- 
ern trails for a holiday with va- 
riety to satisfy the most exacting 
sportsman. If you're a junior or a 
grandad or anywhere between, or a 
gal with a love for excitement this 
new 16mni sound and color pic- 
ture is something to fin<I out about. 
Prints are available on free loan 
for showing to your favorite civic 
club, church group, employe asso- 
ciation or school club. Requests 
should be addressed to the Santa 
Fe Film Bureau. 80 East Jackson 
Blvd., Chicago 4, Illinois, or your 
nearest Santa Fe agent. 



"Skifully Yours" Is New Ford 
Motor Film on Ski Technique 

♦ Demonstrations of skiing tech- 
nique, from the rudimentary points 
of body balance to the difficult sla- 
lom and flashing Christiana turn, 
are shown in SkifiMy Yours, a 23- 
minute sound film available on free 
loan from the Ford Motor Com- 
pany. 

Filmed in color, the documen- 
tary also shows Olympic stars in 
downhill runs and jumps. Scenes 
of Sun Valley. Idaho, picturesque 
setting of the film, round out the 
picture. The 16mm film may be ob- 
tained by writing to any of the 
Ford Motor Company film libraries. 



DE FRENES 




1909 BUTTONWOOD STREET -PHILA. 30, PA. 
RIttenhouse 6-1686 

35 MM-16 MM -COLOR -BLACK & WHITE 



SOUND 




SYSTEM 



located at 3000 Schaefer Road, 
Dearborn. Mich., 445 Park Ave., 
New York. N. Y., or 1500 S. 26th 
St., Box 1666. Richmond. Calif. 

American Kennel Club Sponsors 
Motion Picture On its Services 

♦ For the first time in its sixty 
>ears of existence. The AMERICAN 
Kk.nnei. Club is having a motion 
picture produced to provide those 
who use the Club's services with a 
better understanding of the scope 
of its operations. Photographed in 
color by David Quaid and directed 
by Robert Elwyn. the .SO-minute 
sound film is being produced by 
The Princeton Film Center. Inc. 

More than 350.000 pure bred 
dogs were registered by the Ken- 
nel Club last year, according to 
John Nefl. executive vice president, 
in addition to the many other serv- 
ices provided for member and non- 
member kennel clubs throughout 
the country. 

The picture will be available to 
member and non-member kennel 
clubs for showings through the 
Anierican Kennel Club. 221 Fourth 
Avenue. New York. N. Y. 

Stanley Neal Productions Making 
Film on Life of Mahatma Gandhi 

♦ Quentin Reynolds, \eleran news- 
paper man. author and editor, has 
been selected as narrator for the 
feature-length documentary film on 
the life of Mahatma Gandhi, now 
being cojnpleted in Hollywood by 
Stanley Neal Productions, Inx. 
under the sponsorship of the Ameri- 
can .Academy of Asian Studies. 

The 70-niinute film on Gandhi 
has been assembled from more than 
10.000 feet of newsreel and other 
shots taken of the Indian leader 
over the 37 years from his South 
.\frican days to his assassination in 
1948. The documentary will outline 
and Mr. Reynolds" narration wiH 
emphasize the general philosophies 
of the Hindu nationalist who 
]>reached non-\iolence. 

Distribution of the picture will be 
handled through churches, schools, 
clubs and art theatres around the 
world, and half of the proceeds 
from the showings will go to the 
non-profit American .Academy of 
Asian Studies for its work in pro- 
moting a better understanding be- 
tween East and West. The remain- 
ins half will go to Indian national 
sources for promoting the under- 
standing of Gandhi's philosophy. 
There is also a possibility that the 
film may be made available for 
commercial theatre showing, but at 
the end of 20 years it will be turned 
over to the Indian government as 
a national treasure. 



B I S I N E S S SCREEN M .\ G A Z I N E 



COMBINING QUALITY PRODUCTION 
WITH StUND BUSINESS PROCEDURE 





Scene during production of Proctor 
and Gamble's Public Relations Series at 
Mercury International Studios. 



IM t ma i i Radio Corporation 

SAW Fine Foods 

insulation Board Institut* of America 

Elgin-American 

Certina Watches 

Orange County, California 

Republic Studios 

Rose Hills Memorial Park Association 

Coronet Instructional Films, Division 

of Esquire, Inc. 
Sunkist Products 
Kenneth L. Hoist, Inc. 
Interstate Bakeries 



Henke Ski Beets 

Warner Brother Studies 

Ponder t Best, Inc. 

Sears, Roebuck and Company 

Big Bear Lake, California 

Aluminum Boat Co. of Calif. 

Bulldog Ale 

RKO Studios 

Western Beet Sugar Producers, Inc. 

United Stotes Gypsum Company 

Newport Harbor, California 

Slick Airways, Inc. 



Serutan Products 

XM Eye Glass Cleaner 

American Biscuit and Cracker Co. 

Bullocks, Inc. 

McHenry's Tail-«f.lhe-Cock 

Tulare County, California 

Santa Fe Railway 

Signal Oil Company 

Foote, Cone « Belding 

Dan B. Miner Company 

Leo Burnett Co., Inc. 

Barton A. Stebbins, Advertising 



Currently In Production: 

Cemm : Motenlc Homet of Coliferaia, "DO SoUi Slideflimt; The Tim McCey TV Shew; Public 
UNTO OTHERS"; Nutri4it* SoUs Premotlen, Ralalient Sarin for Practer and Oombl*; traett- 
"THE HOFFMAN STORY," 19S3, 4 Hoffmen TV O'-Chickon Tuna TV SpoH; City of Hep* ToUlkon 

MERCURY INTERNATIONAL PICTURES 



Mil SANTA MONICA lOUUVARD 
■RANCH: TIMrO, INC. 



Nourwooe, CAuratMA 



CNKAOO II, MUNOiS 



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cleans 400 feet of film 

Equally effective for negatives 

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In ECCO 1500 you have all the 
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60 Fronklin SI. • EasI Orange, N. J. 



Film Nomenclature: 

A Digest of Standard Terminology 

(CONTINUED FROM PACK NINETY-FOLK) 

1.5.2 Editorial Synchronism. Editorial Byn- 
chronisin is the relationship between the picture 
and sound film during the editorial processes. 

Note: During the editorial process, the sound track 
and corresponding picture, whether on the same or sepa- 
rate tilms. are kept in alignment and not offset as for 
projection. Thus, cutting a picture and sound can be a 
simultaneous operation. Many composite release nega. 
lives are supplied in editorial synchronism. 

1.5.3 Camera Synchronism. Camera eyn- 
chroni.sm is the relationship between picture and 
sound on an original composite negative. 

Note: Camera synchronism is generally not the sajne 
as projection synchronism and is never the same as 
editorial synchronism. The relationship between picture 
and sound may vary among different type cameras. 

1.8 Printing. Printing is the process of expos- 
ing raw stock by using the image of another film 
as the light modulator. 

Note: Through printing, one may produce a positive 
print from a negative film: a negative film from a posi- 
tive film: or. if the reversal jirocess is employed, printing 
may be used to produce positives from positives or 
negatives from negatives. When the verb "to print'' is 
used, any of the above processes may be implied. 

1.8.2 Projection Printing (Optical Print- 
ing). Projection printing (optical printing) is 
printing by projecting the image to be copied on 
the raw clock. 

Note: When projecting printing, the image being 
copied may be enlarged, reduced, or made the same size. 

1.8.2.1 Reduction Printing. Reduction print- 
ing is the process of producing and recording 
photographically a smaller image, usually on a 
smaller film, from a larger image. 

Note: This process is commonly used in making 
16-mm negatives or prints from 35-mm originals. Film 
thus made is referred to as a reduction negative or re- 
duction print, as the case may be. 

1.9 Projection. Projection is the process of 
presenting a film for either visual or aural re- 
view, or both. 

1.10 Production. Production is the general 
term used to describe the processes involved in 
making all the original material that is the basis 
for the finished motion picture. 

1.11 Editorial Process. Editorial process is 
the term used to describe the combining, cutting, 
editing, and other preparation of material ob- 
obtained from the original material to make the 
finished motion picture. 

1.12 Re-recording. Re-recording is the elec- 
trical process of transferring sound records from 
one or more films or discs to other fibns or discs. 

Note; Re-recording may be used to combine different 
sound records into a single record; to adjust the re- 
sponse-frequency characteristic; or to adjust the rela- 
tive levels between scenes and sequences. 

1.13 Release. Release is a generic term used 
to designate fibns for or intended for general dis- 
tribution and exhibition. 

Note: Unless specificaliy staled, release refers on!\ 
to the normal or domestic release of 35-mm motion pic- 
ture production through agencies within the United 
.Stales. 




1.13.1 16-Mm Release. A 16-mni release des- 
ignates any or all the releases made on 16-inm 
film. 

1.13.3 Release .Negative. A release negative 
is a complete negative prepared specifically for 
printing release prints. 

Note; A release negative may consist of separate pic- 
lure and sound negatives and may be in either projec- 
tion or editorial synchronism, depending upon the film 
processing technique to be employed in making re 
lease prints. 

2.2.5 Picture Dupe Segative. A picture dupe 
negative is a picture negative made from a pic- 
ture duping print. 

Note; It may be used for making other picture prints 
or may be cut to form a part of the picture release 
negative. 

2.2.8 16-Mm Picture Release Negative. A 
16-mm picture release negative is a picture re- 
lease negative on 16-mm film prepared specific- 
ally for printing 16-mm release prints. 

Note: It is generally a dupe negative. 

2.2.9 Picture Release Dupe Negative. A 

picture release dupe negative is a picture dupe 
negative prepared specifically for printing the 
picture portion of release prints. 

2.3 Sound I\egatii'e. A sound negative is any 
negative film which, after exposure to a positive 
sound image and subsequent processing, pro- 
duces a negative sound track on the film. 

2.3.1 Original Sound Negative. The original 
sound negative is the sound negative which is ex- 
posed in a film recorder and after processing 
produces a negative sound image on the film. 

2.3.2 Sound Effects Negative. A sound ef- 
fects negative is a sound negative upon which 
sound efi^ects have been recorded. 

Note: It is ordinarily held in library slock. 
(Complete text available from Amer. Standards .\ssn. > 




CAMERAS. (Press, Sludic 
Candid, Special Purpose, 
Ic), UENSES, PROJEC- 
TORS, Lighting Equip- 
'. ~ toping Equip- 
ment, ENLARGERS, etc. 
for tl 

day, scicntitic 
dustrial work. 






Burke & James, Inc. 



S. Wabash Ave., Chicago 4, 



BUSINESS S i: R K E N M .\ G .\ Z I N E 



OQI^' 




^' 



to produce fine sound motion pictures. A 
completely self contained unit on wheels 
including living quarters and power for 
large lighting. 16 ond 35mm color and films 
especially for TV. 

Featuring New Neg-Pos Co/or Process 

Andover, Vermont 
550 Fifth Ave., N.Y. 36, N.Y. 



-^ 



7 





"••-.'■•-..•"San Jose deK 



COURTNEY HAFELA PRODUCTIONS 



Production of Precision Parts 
Shown in Microcast Color Film 

♦ Microcast — A Slory oj Industrial 
Progress is a new 22 minute. 16nim 
sound film showing the step by 
step process by which precision Mi- 
irocast parts are mass produced for 
industry; a process devehiped for 
the economical production of vir- 
tually non-machinable high tem- 
perature alloys. 

The movie illustrates the devclop- 
nient of the Microcast method by 
the Austenal Laboratories in 1929 
when it was used to manufacture 
surgical and dental appliances. Dur- 
ing World War II. the process was 
adapted for the production of air 
force material. After the war ended, 
Austenal produced parts for jet en- 
gines: more recently the company 
has been engaged in making power 
blades by the Microcast Process for 
the centrifugal and axial flow type 
jet engines. 

(Complete information for secur- 
ing the film for showing may be ob- 
tained from the Microcast Divi- 
sion, Austenal Laboratories, 
Inc., 224 E. 39th Street, New York 
16. New York. 

Technological Progress Shown in 
Engineering Film, "Adam to Atom" 

♦ America's amazing technological 
growth is vividly displayed in the 
29 minute sound film, Adam to 
Atom. This 16mm color film, spon- 
sored by the Centennial of Engi- 
neering, emphasizes the role of the 
engineering profession in its search 
for a more productive way of life 
in America during the last one hun- 
dred years. 

Various scenes trace the scien- 
tific progress of man from the dis- 
covery of the wheel to the modern 
machines of industry. Portrayed is 
the work of such leaders as Henry 
Ford. Eli Whitney, James Watt and 
Guttenberg. A glimpse into the fu- 
ture is presented in scenes of guided 
rockets exploring the unknown 
limits of outer space. Students con- 
sidering the engineering profession 
as their future vocation, will find 
much food for thought in this film. 

Adam to Atom is the official mo- 
tion picture of the Centennial of 
Engineering. It may be obtained 
without charge except for transpor- 
tation from any of the 27 branch of- 
fices of Ideal Pictures Corporation 
by writing to the main office at 65 
East South Water .Street. Chicago 1, 
Illinois. 

Bert Johnston Productions 
Begins Work on Insurance Film 

♦ Bi:HT Johnston I'kooi ctions of 
Cincinnati has begun production on 
a new 16mm film for the Western 



The Coinniercial Newsreel 



NEW SPONSORED FILM PROGRAMS OF THE CURRENT PERIOD 



PURE PICKS A WINNER 



anil Suulhrrn Life Insurance Co. A 
personnel recruiting story, the 
sound and color film is entitled Big 
Enough to Care and will involve 
sound-stage production as well as 
location shooting at Western and 
Southern's home office building. 

The picture will he directed by 
James Hill, general manager of 
Bert Johnston Productions. The 
script has been written by Peg Bol- 
ger. director of the studio's story 
department. Jack Rabius, technical 
director, will supervise photog- 
raphy. John E. Meehan of Western 
and .Southern Life Insurance Co. 
will supervise production of the 
film and direct utilization of the 
prints. 



Crane Company Film Shows New 
Remodeling Ideas for Homeowners 

♦ In ihc ni-H color lOmiii sound 
fihn. The 1 ery Idea, helpful hints 
are presented to homeowners who 
are interested in the remodeling of 
kitchen, bathroom or utility rooms. 
The movie is the story of Jane 
and George Hayes (played by 
Hollywood stars Jennifer Holt and 
Chick Chandler) who take advan- 
tage of an ad inviting them to come 
to the Crane Company for ideas. In 
addition, the Hayes pick up other 
helpful suggestions from their 
neighbors who present other ideas 
on how a home may be improved 
through low cost use of modern 
plumbing techniques and fixtures. 





Above: i\fit Zucker nnd Kit 
Davidson oj IJynuniic Films dur- 
ing production of Pure Oil film 
(see below). 



Sponsor: The Pure Oil Company 
Title: Pick a Winner. 26 min. color, 

priiduced by Dynamic Films. Inc. 
■^ That there's an audience for auto 
racing films is indicated by the re- 
cent report of the Department of 
Commerce which showed that auto 
racing is now the fourth largest 
paid attendance sport in the U.S. 

The Pure Oil Company, which 
has long used the race track as a 
promotional device and as a prov- 
ing ground for its products, is now 
paying tribute to the sport in this 
exciting film on four national cham- 
pionship events which took place 
last year. It shows the record 
139.034 MPH qualifying run of the 
ill-fated Novi Pure Oil Special at 
Indianapolis, and Chet Miller's win- 
ning runs in stock car races at De- 
troit. Daytona Beach and Darling- 
ton. 

Pick a Winner tells not only the 
stor)' of the races, themselves, but 
depicts the tension and excitement 
of all the side activities in the pits 
before, during and after the races. 
Prints are available from The Pure 
Oil Company in Chicago, or from 
Dynamic Films, 112 West 89th 
Street. New York. 9 

Nutritional Advantages of 
Calif. Prune Featured in Film 

♦ The California prune is a star in 
Good Wrinkles. 16mm cartoon film 
which illustrates the larger percen- 
tages of daily requirements of Vita- 
min A and other important nutri- 
ents supplied by the prune. The pic- 
ture also features a trip to the 
"nursery" orchard, the processing 
plant, and .American and Scandina- 
vian recipes for serving prunes. 

Produced by All-Scope Produc- 
tions. Inc.. the 18-minute Techni- 
colored film is available on free- 
loan from Modern Talking Pic- 
tire Service. Inc.. 45 Rockefeller 
Plaza, New York 20, or any of 
Modern's regional exchanges. 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 




^a^-^^^ 



FORMERLY VISUAL TRAINING CORPORATION 
•IS laltt Siratt • Datrall 2*, MIchlgH 




I 'I-,. I iMdi I) I ( r I (I \ II ^ \ H « 



101 




PEOPLE WHO MAKE PICTURES 



PROniTTioN TALK; (I. to T, above) 
\athan Zurker, Board Chairman, Dy- 
namic Films discusses netc film icilh 
lames A. Dearborn (center) Director of 
Advertising and Tom F. Huglies. Motion 
Picture Supervisor, both of American 
Airlines. Story elsewhere in this issue. 



R. S. Saichek Named Ad 
Manager of Ampro Corporation 

♦ Tlif a[)]K)intment in late Janu- 
ary of Robert S. Saichek as ad- 
vertising and sales promotion man- 
ager for the Ampro Corporation 
was announced by Howard Marx, 
vice-president and general sales 
manager of the Chicago projection 
and tape recorder manufacturers. 
Saichek is the former director of 
advertising for Eicor. Inc.. and was 




Robert S. Saichek 

a partner in the Bomart Advertis- 
ing Agency. He has also served as 
a product designer with Design 
Associates of Chicago. A 30-year 
old veteran of World War H, he 
studied engineering at Georgia In- 
stitute of Technology and attended 
the Chicago Institute of Design and 
the Chicago Academy of Fine Arts. 

Recordak Corp. President Retires 
♦ George L. McCarthy, whose in- 
ventive genius as a bank vice- 
president has led to use of micro- 
film for record-keeping in more 
than 65 types of business, has re- 
tired as president of Recordak 
Corp.. subsidiary of Eastman Ko- 
dak Co. John K. Boeing, former Re- 
cordak vice-president, has been 
elected to succeed him as president. 



Master Film Wins Merit Award 

♦ M. Master, president of Boston's 
Master Motion Picture Co. re- 
cently received the Certificate of 
Merit from the Council of Jewish 
Federations and Welfare Funds for 
his film A Single Voice produced on 
behalf of the Combined Jewish Ap- 
peal of Greater Boston. 

Papineau to Kling Studios 

♦ Ku.NC Sti Dios has announced 
the appointment of Gail Papineau 
as Hollywood manager of the stu- 
dio's newly-organized West Coast 
industrial fihn department. 

William Nemeth Joins Unifilms 

♦ A new member of the staff of 
the Unifilms. Inc. New York and 
Philadelphia producers, is William 



Nemeth (see cut at right). Mr. 
Nemeth's appointment was an- 
nounced in February and he has al- 
ready assumed his new duties. 

Wiegand and Gay Named to 
Craw/ley Film Production Staff 

♦ Crawley Films Ltd., producers 
of Ottawa, Canada, announced the 
appointment of Kenneth Gay as 
director of the Art and Animation 
Department, and Phillip WieganT) 
to serve on the production staff. 

Mr. Gay, who was brought from 
England, aided in the production of 
training films for the Royal Navy. 
After the war he worked on such 
fibns as Hoiv Television Worlcs, 
Circulation of the Blood, and Sound 
for the David Hand Studios in Lon- 



WHAT tS COLOR C0RR6CTI0N??? 




If your laboratory can alter the color as- 
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dependently treat each scene within a 
production as a separate picture, ONLY 
then have your prints undergone true 
color correction . . . 

THE STEP PRINTING EQUIPMENT 
used by COLOR SERVICE CO. INC. was 
designed by our own engineers specific- 
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FOR PROMPT PERSONALIZED 
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specialists-for the finest COLOR COR- 
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NEW YORK 36, N. Y. 



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PRICE SCHEDULE AND BROCHURE AVAILABLE 
UPON REQUEST . . . 




don. Immediately prior to his Craw- 
ley appointment, Mr. Gay was a 
unit director with William Larkins 
in London. 

Mr. Wiegand, a member of Eq- 
uity Actors Association, has played 
in and directed a number of stock 
companies in the New England 
area. In addition. Wiegand has di- 
rected a series of radio shows as 
well as doing work on CBS televi- 
sion. 

David Welling Opens OfTice as 
Film Writer and Consultant 

♦ David C. Welling, former assist- 
ant to W. M. Bastable. head of the 
film division at Swift & Co.. has 
opened his own office in Chicago as 
a writer of sound-slide and motion 
picture scripts and a consultant in 
planning and creation of other visu- 
al aids. 

Welling, whose offices are at 176 
West Adams street, was graduated 
from the University of Illinois in 
1937. After three years as city edi- 
tor of the Evening Courier in 
Champaign-Urbana. he became edi- 
tor of The Watch Word, plant 
publication at the Elgin National 
Watch Co. 

His background includes foods 
merchandising, advertising for a 
home appliance company, sales pro- 
motion for a magazine, sales train- 
ing, and public relations for a group 
of medical specialists engaged in 
fund raising for a charitable foun- 
dation and hospital. 

Dynamic Films Duo Shooting 
With New Eastman Color Film 

♦ Germaine Kellerman and Har- 
old Brackett were shooting last 
month at Dynamic Films' studios 
in New York on the first entire 
theatrical subject produced on East- 
man Kodak's new tungsten (type 
Bl 35nim negative color stock. The 
finished film. Woodland Fantasy, 
should provide a lot of answers con- 
rerning the range and accuracy of 
rolor reproduction on the new 
F.astman stock. ^ 



102 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



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1933 PROnUCTIO.\ RE\IEW 



103 



Modern Industrial Engineering 
Viewed in New Drovo Film 

♦ Dravo Corporation. Pittsburgh, 
has ((iniplelcd a new 30-minute. 
16niin sound film in color docu- 
menting many of the lirtn's diversi- 
fied activities serving nearly every 
segment of industry, tnlitled Por- 
trail of an Enterprise, the film typi- 
fies modern .\meri<an industrial 
engineering firms. Kniphasis is 
placed on engineering of all kinds, 
the key to operations of Dravo's 
four main divisions and five subsid- 
iaries. 

In the film are on-the-job scenes 
of heavy construction projects, 
river locks, dams, bridges. Also in- 
cluded are riverboats and barge 
construction and launchings. and 
operation of large ore unloaders. 
Production and distribution of 
river sand and gravel are highlight- 
ed in other sequences. Construction 
of a central station power plant and 
a gas transmission line compressor 
station are depicted. 

The picture is available without 
charge for showing to engineering 
groups, schools and colleges and 
other interested organizations. Write 
to Advertising Department. Dravo 
Corporation. Neville Island. Pitts- 
burgh 25. Pa. 

Admiral Sales Program Completed 

♦ A coordinated sales training and 
visual sales promotional program 
for the Admiral Corporation was 
completed last month by Kling 
Studios. 

"The program was designed to 
promote sales of the new Admiral 
line of home freezers through the 
promotion of a frozen food plan 
which sells the freezer in a package 
food combination deal." Fred A. 
NiLES, Kling vice president, said. 

The Kling package included a col- 
or slidefilm for sales training, a 
color flip chart for use by retail 
salesmen in the home, brochures 
for food plan entrepreneurs use in 
establishing sales organizations, re- 
tail aids, and scripts and color slides 
for training use at the recent Ad- 
miral Dealers and Distributors' con- 



Britain's New Jet Airliner; 
Printing Art Shown in Pictures 

♦ The newest British jet airliner. 
England's contribution to printing, 
and the work of an English sculp- 
tor are portrayed in three new fibns 
available from the British Informa- 
tion Services. 

The story of England's new jet 
airliner is told in the 20 minute, 
16mm sound film. Britain's Comet. 
This motion picture shows tlie 
story of the plane's construction, 
testing, first flight, and finally its 



What's New in Easine ss Pictures 

Engineering, Sales Training, Atomic Energy on the Screen 



acceptance as a commercial air- 
liner. The Comet is powered by 
four jet engines which permit it to 
fly at sub-zero temperatures at 
speeds up to 500 miles |jer hour. 

In another 20-minute. 16mm 
sound film titled. In Black anii 
U liite. the British contribution to 
printing is clearly illustrated. This 
movie presents many interesting de- 
tails such as the development of type 
faces, the printing of outstanding 
works, and making available 
through inexpensive editions, such 
as the Penguin series, the best in 
literature. These scenes illustrate 



how alive British printing is and 
how well it has managed to continue 
operations during and after the war. 

The work of Britain's greatest 
sculptor is clearly deliniated in the 
26 minute. 16mm sound film titled. 
Henry .Moore. This movie, made 
with the close cooperation of the 
artist, depicts examples of Moore's 
early endeavors as well as some of 
his more recent works. 

Further information concerning 
these films and their availability 
may be secured from the British 
INFORM.ATION SERVICES, 30 Rocke- 
feller Plaza. New York 20. N. Y. 




Fire 
on the 
Farm 







The Chicago Pneumatic 
Tool Company 

wanted to tell a story about 
highway tire service. 



The National Board 
of Fire Underwriters 

wanted to tell a story about 
rural (ire control. 



The Women's League 
for Israel 

wanted to tell a story about 
their work with displaced 
persons in Israel. 



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■'^lene in '\4 Is for .Atom" 

"A Is for Atom" Is An Excellent 
G.E. "Excursion in Science" Film 

* A Is fur Atom is an animated 
color film produced by John Suther- 
land Productions, Inc. that explains 
atomic energy' in as simple and 
clear a form as it can be explained. 
This picture will be interesting to 
all kinds of audiences. It runs about 
14 minutes, and a 10-minute thea- 
trical version is also being shown. 
The film will be practically must 
material for every high school, gen- 
eral science and introductory phys- 
ics course, not to mention its inter- 
est to every adult in the country. 
A Is for Atom opens with a se- 
quence establishing how the shadow 
of the atomic bomb and the advent 
of the atomic age has changed and 
is changing the world. 

This review is no place to go into 
the subject matter of the film. Suf- 
fice it to say that it covers the ex- 
planation of what an atom is, how- 
nuclear fission works, what a reac- 
tor pile is. what radioactive isotopes 
are. and concludes with the hope- 
ful reminder that the atomic age is 
not only helping the warrior, but it 
is also helping the engineer, the 
farmer, the healer, and the research 
worker. 

The main point is that the film is 
a fine job of telling the atomic 
story. As one of the GE Excursions 
in Science series it contains no com- 
mercials, and this reporter is willing 
to bet that it will be one of the most 
popular films produced this year. 

The 16mm version was shot in 
Kodachrome and the 35mm version 
was handled in Ansco color nega- 
tive. Distribution is being handled 
bv GE and information on free 
loan prints may be obtained from 
General Electric's Film Depart- 
ment at Schenectady, New York. 
Libraries are maintained in major 
I . S. cities. 

Progress Report on Railroading 

♦ A new system of railroading, 
called "RDC", that promises to re- 
\ italize the short passenger haul and 
the abandoned spur was demonstrat- 
ed last month in a new film pro- 
duced b) Marathon TV Newsreel. 

RDC's (rail diesel cars) are al- 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



ready profitably at work on such 
routes as the New Haven's Old Col- 
ony Line where ser\ite had been 
maintained most reluctantly before. 
As the film shows, the self-powered, 
single car train has been a welcome 
answer to the short haul problems 
iif the Pennsylvania-Reading. West- 
ern Pacific, Santa Fe and others. 

Clear Iron, H niin. b/w. is os- 
tensibly a simon-pure film for 
theatrical and TV distribution, but 
actually it is sponsored by Mara- 
thon's almost silent partner in the 
film venture, the RDC's manufac- 
turer, the Budd Company. 

Clear Iron was photographed on 
railroads across the country. For 
the average audience it will provide 
interesting information on railroad 
progress: and for the not inconsid- 
erable number of devoted railroad- 
ing buffs it will be a delight. Good 
Scenes: Action shots made from the 
cab, and from cameras mounted all 
over the top and sides of the moving 
RDC. 



Wisconsin Motion Picture Details 
Civic Activities of Milwaukee 

♦ A moiiiin picture »liicli depicts 
the city of Milwaukee's govern- 
mental structure, its economic basis, 
and its development problems has 
been released by the L niversity 
of Wisconsin. The Miltvaukee If ay 
shows the city in its role of a 
great center of production and in- 
dustry a place of fruitful and pleas- 
ant liv ing. How Milwaukee has won 
numerous national health and safe- 
ty awards is shown as well as its 
splendid recreational facilities for 
living "the good life." 

Particularly emphasized is Mil- 
waukee's largest enterprise, its city 
government — how it functions, 
what its problems are, and how it 
serves the entire community. Edu- 
cational and cultural activities, pro- 
tective services, public welfare, and 
public service efforts are all de- 
scribed. 

The 40-minute sound and color 
film was photographed and direct- 
ed by Jackson Tiffany of the Bureau 
of Visual Instruction staff from a 
script originally prepared bv Her- 
man Engel. former bureau techni- 
cian now in New York. Walter Wit- 
tich. BVI director, was executive 
I)roHucer of the film which is nar- 
rated by Karl Schmidt of the WHY 
state station production department. 

To Iw available for civic proup 
showings early in 1053. the film's 
distribution will he handled bv the 
Milwaukee Cilv Museum's Film Li- 
brary and by the Universitv of Wis- 
• ■■nsin's Bureau of Visual Instruc- 
tion. 



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1 •) .i 3 I' R I) I t; T I O N REVIEW 



HOI-OING A PROMINENT l'L.\CE in 
the rapidly growing field of 
audio-visual educalioii in 1952. the 
medical motion picture was gener- 
ally better in content and technical 
quality and was seen by more people 
ill both professional and lay groups 
I and as individuals I than in any 
preceding year. 

The expanding audiences include 
the millions who saw health films 
on television as well as the increas- 
ing thousands of groups and insti- 
tutions now having ready access to 
16mm projection equipment. 

Factors Improving Films 
Better production of medical mo- 
lion pictures was particularly in- 
fluenced by the numerous organiza- 
tions now critically evaluating these 
films, by the increasing amount of 
experience and special production 
techniques acquired and by a broad- 
er and more basic approach to the 
needs of the medical film user, 
whether in the medical schools or 
for practicing members of the pro- 
fession. 

Of all the fields of factual film 
production, the medical motion 
picture is probably the most com- 
plex in its demand for absolute ac- 
curacy and objectivity in content 
and the special production knowl- 
edge required. It is in these latter 
two phases, incidentally, wherein 
both informed sponsors and experi- 
enced, specializing producers have 
made the greatest strides during the 
past year. 

25% Increase in Bookings 
Most distributors of medical mo- 
tion pictures reported an increase 
in the number of requests for their 
films. For example. 2088 films were 
booked by the film library of the 
American Medical Association. This 
represents a 25*7 increase over the 
year 1951, and is the greatest num- 
ber of films distributed by the 
American Medical Association since 
the film library was founded. 

The AMA's films were loaned to 
hospitals, medical schools and state 
and county medical societies, as 
well as to small groups of physi- 
cians It is significant to note that a 
total of 69 U. S. medical schools ac- 
counted for over 400 bookings of 
films from the AMA film library 
alone. This is exclusive of the many 
hundreds of films which are loaned 
to such groups by the pharmaceu- 
tical companies, government agen- 
cies and other distributors of medi- 
cal motion pictures. 

As further evidence of the in- 
creased interest in medical films it 
should be noted that the motion pic- 
ture film programs at medical so- 
ciety meetings were especially well 



PROGRESS IN MEDICAL FILM 
PRODUCTION AND DISTRIBUTION 

A Production Review Keporl by Kalpli I'. Oeer 

Sfcreliirt. Coinniilli'r on Mi'iliial Miiliiin I'irhircs. .Imcrirnii Medical Assn. 



attended. Such motion picture pm- 
grams arc now an integral part of 
the annual and midwinter sessions 
of the American Medical .Associa- 
tion, the American College of Sur- 
geons, the International College of 
.Surgeons, the American Academy of 
Ophthalmology and Otolaryngology, 
the American .Academy of Ortho- 
paedic Surgeons, and other national 
medical societies. Many state medi- 
cal societies now show medical mo- 



tion pictures as a regular part of 
their annual scientific programs. 

In a recent statement comment- 
ing on the "Cine Clinic" programs 
sponsored by Davis & Geek, the 
President of the American College 
of .Surgeons stated: 

"The fineness of the film, the 
present day perfection of the tech- 
nique of its production, the ease 
with which it may be transported, 
the simplicity of its projection to 



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an audience of six or 2000 and the 
readiness with which the film mes- 
sage can be edited and condensed 
and organized to fit countless in- 
dividual situations, make the mod- 
ern color, sound track film a pow- 
erful and important teaching me- 
dium. It is conceivable that colored 
iMolion pictures of surgical opera- 
lions may someday become the most 
important part of a surgical meet- 
ing." 

Reorganization of the American 
Dental .Association film library in 
the past year resulted in an in- 
crease of 50/f in its collection of 
dental health education subjects and 
scientific films. .\ total of 65 titles 
(298 prints) is now available, cov- 
ering such fields as operative den- 
tistry and periodontics, and such 
dental health subjects as oral hy- 
giene and fluoridation. 

Nurses Plan Film Program 
The -American Nurses Association 
made plans to organize an audio- 
visual program in cooperation with 
the National League for Nursing. 

The Audio-Visual Institute of the 
Association of American Medical 
Colleges inaugurated a program of 
audio-visual preview circuits for 
medical colleges. Of benefit to both 
producers and faculty, this plan pro- 
vides previews of all types of audio- 
visual material. The producer has 
the advantage of placing his new 
material before selected audiences 
for evaluation. The medical school 
faculty has the opportunity of in- 
specting all new audio-visual ma- 
terials applying to the field of medi- 
cal instruction. 

AMA Survey of Hospitals 
In 1952 the .American Medical 
.Association made a survey of hos- 
pitals with regard to their audio- 
visual program and the following 
specific questions were asked: 

1. Is a 16mm sound motion pic- 
ture projector available for use 
when needed? 

2. Do you use motion pictures in 
vour medical staff meetings? (. . . 
often, occasionally, not at all.) For 
nurses training? (. . . often, occa- 
sionally, not at all.) 

3. Compare present use of mo- 
tion pictures in your hospital with 
use five years ago. 1. . . more, 
less, same.) 

81-2/3"^; Report Greater Use 
Final tabulation of these data 
will not be completed until April 
or May of this year. However a ran- 
dom sample of 300 returns from 
hospitals of 100 or more bed ca- 
pacity reveals the following. In an- 
swer to question three 245 hos- 
pitals, or 81 2/3%, replied more: 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 




51, or 17%, replied same; and 4, or 
1%% replied less. 

The Committee on Medical Mo- 
tion Pictures of the American Medi- 
cal Association received several 
hundred requests from foreign coun- 
tries with regard to the availability 
of medical motion pictures. Most 
distributors of medical films are re- 
reluctant to loan copies of their 
films to foreign countries because 
of the delay in clearing such pic- 
tures through customs. If a satis- 
factory arrangement can be devised 
whereby medical films can be 
shipped to and from foreign coun- 
tries with a minimum of red tape 
and delav. it would stimulate the 
exchange of medical films on an 
international basis. 

Films Appreciated Abroad 
At the 1952 National Assembly 
of Surgeons of Mexico a section on 
audio-visual teaching of surgery 
was included for the first time. This 
was a highly successful program 
which included papers on motion 
pictures and television. As an in- 
dication of the value of sending 
films to foreign countries, we quote 
herewith from a letter from a group 
of physicians in Aruba: 

"We have received and shown 
these films from your film library at 
our monthly doctors meeting. These 
films have been exceptionally well 
received by the doctors and we want 
you to know that your kindness in 
making such excellent medical 
films available to us is highly ap- 
preciated by all concerned. We sin- 
cerely hope that we shall be able to 
maintain our present arrangements 
with your office since we are in 
quite an isolated area, medically 
speaking from a contact standpoint, 
and value the opportunity to gain 
infornialicin from your films.'" 

Outstanding Health Films 
During the year 1952. several 
\cry effective health films were pro- 
duced and distributed to lay groups. 
The outstanding examples were: 
Breast Self Examination, produced 
by the American Cancer Society. 
How to Catch a CoUI. produced by 
the International Cellucotton Co.. 
and Cheers for Chubby, produced 



bv the Metropolitan Life Insurance 
Co. 

The professional film series on 
cancer diagnosis prepared for the 
American Cancer Society were a 
milestone in films' contribution to 
medicine. 

Prepare Video Film List 
Because of the interest shown by 
the nation's television stations in the 
use of health education films, the 
Committee on Medical Motion Pic- 
tures of the AMA has prepared I and 
recently supplemented I a special list 
of health films cleared for TV. This 
publication, titled "A List of Health 
Education Motion Pictures Cleared 
for Ise on Television" was sent to 
all program directors of the nation's 
television stations and has been a 
most useful contribution to their 
needs as well as a real stimulus to 
public education through this mass 
medium. 

There has been considerable in- 
terest in the use of color television 
as applied to medical education and 
the color television programs at the 
American College of Surgeons. 
.American Medical Association and 
other national society meetings con- 
tinue to attract large audiences. 
These programs are sponsored by 
Smith. Kline, and French Co. of 
Philadelphia. The I. niversity of Chi- 
cago, the University of Kansas and 
the LJniversity of Pennsylvania 
schools of medicine were the first 
three medical schools to install per- 
manent medical color television 
equipment. S' 



New York Public Library Opens 
Lending Library of 16mm Films 

♦ The New York Public Library an- 
nounced this month that it has set 
up a lending library of 16mm films 
which will be made available to 
non-profit community groups. 

As explained by John MacKenzie 
Cory, chief of the circulation depart- 
ment, in the current issue of the 
Library's publication, "Branch Li- 
brary Book News," the films will 
be available from branches in Man- 
hattan, the Bronx and Staten Island. 
Subjects, which will be tied to the 
Library's program. "Exploring the 
American Idea," will range from 
the Declaration of Independence to 
city planning. 

The Library's film lending serv- 
ice was made possible through a 
grant from the Ford Foundation. 

Public libraries in Cleveland. 
Cincinnati. Detroit. Kansas City. 
Louisville and other centers have 
maintained 16nnn film collections 
for their patrons with notable suc- 
cess in recent years. 



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CASE HISTORIES OF BUSINESS FILMS 

Fighting Prejudice 

■■Cliiick Hanson One Guy" Define^ I'lohleiii 
in Induslry and Helps Brinp Solution 

Sponsor: The National Conference of Christian? 

and Jews 
Title: Chuck Hansen — One Guy, 26 niin. color, 

produced by D.P.M. Productions. Inc. 
•^ Chuck Hansen, a guy who work.s in the Bay- 
onne. New Jersey, plant of the General Cable 
Corporation, is a bluff, jovial type, and he 
used to vigorously deny that he had the slightest 
hit of prejudice against anjone. But he did, in 
little ways, almost unbeknownst to himself. 

Chuck Hansen hadn't caught the disease of 
prejudice very badly, but his infection, and that 
of millions of more viruleiitlv afflicted guys like 
him are figured to have cost the nation last year 
some thirty billion dollars. 

Based on Bound Table Conferences 
Luckily. Chuck Hansen, as the fibn shows, 
and other guys like him at General Cable, were 
able to do something about prejudice, and it 
has made their daily work more resultful and 
more rewarding. They took part in an in-plant 
round-table series of conferences put on bv the 
Labor Management Commission of the National 
Conference of Christians and Jews, in which 
each problem of prejudice in the plant — and in 
the plant community — was laid on the table for 
study to see if any part of it seemed to make 
sense. And none of it seemed to — to Chuck, nor 
to a hundred other guys in the plant. 

Where this film strikes off on a new tangent 
from others of its type is in recognition that the 
prejudice is there all right — even in millions 
of good friendly Joes like Chuck Hansen. You 
couldn't phase Chuck by whaling away at him 
about prejudice, ordinarily. He'd say. "Well, 
they don't mean me." So, the film gets down to 
define how prejudice is not just a case of using 
dirty names about other religions and races — 
it is a lot of little things that add up and mul- 
ti|)l\. into prejudice. 

Good Production Technique Noted 
Chuck Hansen . . . has been sensibly written, 
by Ralph Schoolman, and impeccably photo- 
graphed, by Olle Comstedt. You might have 

Bevom) the Factory Gates good rela- 
tions continue among workers. 





CillcK Ha.nse.v shares a lift with a I'uerto Rican, 
a J etc, a Fole and a Negro . . . his friends. 

wished they had tried live sound for all the 
participants instead of Chuck's stream-of-con- 
sciousness narration throughout. 
Where you ca\ get it! From any of the 62 
regional offices of the National Conference, or 
from Films of the Nations. 62 West 4.5th Street. 
New York. ^ 

Matson ]Navif:ation Presents Color 
Picture on the \oyage to Hawaii 

M Matson Navigation Companv of San Fran- 
cisco has released its new color film Letters 
From Hawaii which tells the story of a trip 
from mainland I . S. A. to the Hawaiian Islands 
and return and describes the life aboard ship 
and the experiences of a young couple in visit- 
ing Honolulu. W aikiki and the outer islands. 

The half-hour sound color film was produced 
by Pat Dowling Pictures of Los .Angeles, 
through Matson's agency. Hoist. Ciunmings and 
Myers. Several months' time was taken bv the 
filming crew in making scenes inside and out- 
side the luxury liner Lurline. and in visiting 
scenic highspots of the Islands. Featured play- 
ers in the film are Madalyn Perry. Paul Ray- 
mond. Betty Blythe and Gayne Whitman. 

The format of this new travel film is some- 
what unusual in that the story is told in the 
form of letters, coming frequentlv from the is- 
lands to the girl's parents back home, who sit 
by their fireside and read of the tropical places 
and the entertainments experienced by the travel- 
ing couple. 5jf 



Training Slidefilms 

That get results while saving 
you time, saving you money. 
May we screen some of our 
recent productions for you? 

Berlet Anderson Marlin 

549 WEST RANDOLPH ST. 
CHICAGO 6, ILLINOIS 



BUSINESS SCREEN !MAG.\ZINE 



BUSINESS SCREEN EXECUTIVE 




Don Durlvn 



Don B. Ourian Joins Vogue-Wright 

♦ !)()> B. UlKiA-N »a.s leiently ap- 
pointed account executive on motion 
pictures, slidefilms. and television 
productions for Vocie-Wricht 
Studios of Chicago. 

For the past 12 years Mr. Durian 
has hcen associated with The Jam 
Handy Organization where he 
served as motion picture and slide- 
fihii scenario writer as well as a 
Detroit sales representative. Since 
1948 he has heen with Jam Handys 
Chicago office, serving both as sales 
manager and planning director. 

Before entering the film field. Mr. 
Durian was a news editor and re- 
porter for the Associated Press and 
sports writer for the Chicago Herald 
American. A native lowan, he was 
graduated from the University of 
Iowa School of Journalism. 

Ampro Names H. C. Handberg 
Assistant General Sales Manager 

♦ Appoiiilmcnt of Howard C. 
I Handberg as assistant general sales 

manager of .Am PRO Corp. was an- 
nounced by Howard Marx, vice 
president and general sales manager 
of the Chicago manufacturer of mo- 
lion picture and tape recording 
equipment. 

For 12 years Mr. Handberg had 
been national merchandising man- 
ager for Motorola, Inc. He was also 
assistant sales manager and midwest 
regional manager, serving as a co- 
ordinator in the firm's procurement 
and purchasing department during 
the war. 

Before his association with 



COLORSLIDE AND FILMSTRIP 
DUPLICATING 

FRANK A. HOLMBS 
7619 Sun 



Motorola Mr. Handberg had 
worked with Johns Manville, in Chi- 
cago and St. Louis, and the Manu- 
facturer's Trust Companv of New 
York. 

Three Dimension Company Names 
Three as New Vice Presidents 

♦ The appointment of three execu- 
tives to the positions of vice-presi- 
dent was announced by Henry 
BoiiM. president of the Three Di- 
mension Company. Chicago. 

Named vice-president in charge 
of manufacturing is Wiluam B. 
Hoffman, former purchasing agent: 
the company s chief engineer. Frank 
P. Bennett, assumed the post of 
vice-president in charge of Engin- 
eering: and the former sales and 
advertising manager. Robert G. 
Smith, became vice-president in 
charge of sales. 

At the same time these appoint- 
ments were made. Three Dimen- 
sion s new plant was opened at 3512 
North Kostner Avenue. Chicago. 
With this plant plus the Company's 
facilities at 4555 West Addison 
Street in Chicago, the firm has in- 
creased its capacity by four times. 

Eastman Kodak Promotes C. L. Wynd 

* C. L. A. \S YND has been named an 
assistant general manager of the 
Eastman Kodak Company's Kodak < 
Park Works, it was announced re- 
cently by Ivar N. Hultman. Kodak 
vice president. Mr. Hultman. recent- 
ly made general manager of Kodak 
Park, said that in his new post Mr. 
Wvnd will share responsibilities with 
Gerould T. Lane, also an assistant 
general manager of the plant. 

Other appointments announced 
were those of Dr. Louis K. Eilers. 
who becomes administrative assistant 
to the general manager. Kodak Park, 
and Dr. Austin J. Gould, who was 
named assistant manager of the film 
manufacturing organization. 

A. J. Hammer Named RCA Victor Mgr. 

♦ \i>i>i>intincnt of .Arthlr J. Ham- 
mer as southwestern regional mana- 
ger for RCA Victor was announced 
recently. He succeeds James W. 
Cooke, veteran RCA Victor execu- 
tive, who is retiring. 

In his new post. Mr. Hammer will 
represent the company in field op- 
erations, with responsibility for ad- 
ministration, distribution, and sales 
of RCA and RCA Victor products in 
the southwestern region. The region 
covers Texas. Arizona. New Mexico. 
Oklahoma, and portions of Missis- 
>ippi. Arkansas, and Louisiana. 




\j4/4^^€^/ C/Xy o' continuous 
u production of quality films for 
INDUSTRY, EDUCATION AND 
ENTERTAINMENT have brought 
us a clientele of satisfied cus- 
tomers reaching all over the 
world, wherever motion pic- 
tures are used. 

We are proud of the services 
v^e have been privileged to 
render in both the production 
and distribution of films for 
practically every purpose for 
which visual aids can be used. 



Bray Studios ,». 

729 Seventh Avenue 
New York 19, N . Y . 



19 3 3 I'KIt I) t CTION RKVIKVl 



109 



to»/M!«^ 



SBK^KES 



I 

I Complete Technical and Editorial 

j Services to 16 mm Business, Educa- 

I tlonal and Religious Film Producers 



SCRIPT PREPARATION 



i TITLES AND ANIMATION 



PHOTOGRAPHY 



I SOUND RECORDING 

I 

I RE-RECORDING 

J from magnetic tape or film 

! MUSIC LIBRARY 



EDITING AND CONFORMING 



:gg|^ GEO. W. COLBURN 
^^ LABORATORY, INC. 

164 NORTH WACKER DRIVE, CHICAGO 6, ILIINOIS 

Edge-Numbered Work Prints— Color .Masten — 
Duplicate Negatives — -Release Prints 



Introducing 




"MR. YESTERLIVER" 

He hadn't ^een the new sound 
slidefilin: 

"PUBLIC RELATIONS 
FOR BUSINESS AND 
PROFESSIONAL PEOPLE" 

It tells the ABC's of public relations and 

how good public relations can be attained. 

It can be used by a company or in any 

business training course. 

Authored by a well known public relations 

director, and executed in clever cartoon 

style. 

Copies of the film and accompanying sound 

record are available on a previpw-rental or 

sale basic from; 

PAT DOWLING 
PICTURES 

1056 SO. ROBERTSON BLVD. 
LOS ANGELES 35, CALIFORNIA 



CASE HISTORIES OF BUSINESS KILMS 

Ouesi for Antibiolics 

Miracle of Mo(li<inc From Kartli 
U Tli.-m.- of E. R. S.iiiil.l, Pi. lurr 



S])onsor: K. K. Squibb H. Suns 

Title: And the Earth Shall Give Back Life, 

2.5 min, b/w. produced by Louis deRochemont 

■¥■ Every few years, E. R. Squibb & Sons steps 
from its role of one of the best and principal 
suppliers of medical motion pictures for the pro- 
fession and opens its doors through film for the 
public to see what goes on in its manufacturing 
laboratories. 

Beginning this month, audiences are invited 
to see the amazingly complex process of making 
the so-called "wonder drugs"' such as penicillin 
and the various "mycin" antibiotics. 

One of Original Penicillin Producers 
Squibb, along with Pfizer and .Merck, was 
one of the original firms to tackle penicillin pro- 
duction on a large scale, in 1942, and is today 
a leading manufacturer of this first and still one 
of (he most potent of natural enemies of disease. 
The film shows that just as the earth gives 
forth life in the beginning and receives it back 
at the end. so also does the earth now preserve 
life during its course. 

It tells the storv of the unending quest for 
powerful new antibiotics in tiny samples of soil 
gathered from all parts of the globe. In the end. 
perhaps onlv one soil sample out of many thou- 
sand yields an antibiotic organism capable of 
healing powers, but the discovery of one more 
than makes up for all the failures. 

Turning Discovery Into Manufacture 
As important as the isolation of a new anti- 
biotic which emerges the victor against disease 
is the translation of discovery into production. 
When investigators feel that a newly discovered 
antibiotic holds real promise, pharmaceutical 
laboratories produce enough of the new agent 
to permit extensi\'e pharmacological testing and 
eventual clinical trial. Then production engi- 
neers are called upon to solve the complex prob- 
lems necessary to step up production from five 
gallon lots to as much as a thousand gallons at 
a time, duplicating on a huge scale the extreme 

.'\CTI0N OF Antibiotic Fi.uiu in comhattinfi dis- 
ease organisms shown in new Squibb film. 

/ ANTIBIOTIC ..^ ^T^ 

FLUID % M 






Hlck Fermentation Tanks "grow" penicillin, 
streptomycin and otlier uonder drugs. 

accuracy and scientific caution once associated 
only w ith laboratory processes of test-tube size. 
Finally, thousands of precisely measured 
quantities of the new antibiotic medicines are 
individually packaged and distributed to physi- 
cians in many lands, thus bringing to fulfill- 
ment a process of creation that began with the 
discovery of a single micro-organism in a pinch 
of soil, and that step by step throughout its 
course, has called forth the utmost talents of 
gifted men in both science and industry. Through 
their patient efforts the earth has truly been 
made to "give back life."' ^ 



"'Meal Time Is Variety Time" 
Says Standard Brands to Bakers 

■¥^ A 1953 color motion picture release of the 
Fleischmann Division. Standard Brands. Inc., is 
Meal Time Is Variety Time, a long (40 minute) 
but highly informative subject destined exclu- 
sively for a nationwide audience of over 20,000 
commercial bakers. 

Special baker meetings in principal cities will 
view the actual production of a wide variety of 
sweet rolls and coffee cakes (100 examples) that 
can be made from basic sweet and Danish 
doughs. The Bakery Production Service Dept. 
of the Fleischmann Division, headed by G. H. 
Ekstedt. is handling this important current pro- 
motional effort. Greater production efiBciency as 
well as greater sales and profits are audience re- 
wards and an important part of the film's 
content. ^ 



yy^^Ut^ /Vo \a 



MEDICAL MOTION PICTURES 
AhTo^lLLU STRATI ON 



Specioliiing ex. 
in medical ond 




159 EAST CHICAGO AVENUE 
CHICAGO 1 1, lUINOIS 
TELEPHONE SU PERIOR 7 8656 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAG.4ZINE 



Tool and Die Maker Featured 
in New Picture on Craft 

♦ As a symbol of Americas mass 
production, the tool and die maker 
will be a leading light of a new 
color film to be produced for the 
National Tool and Die Manufactur- 
ers Association by Farrell & Gage 
Films, Inc. 

Shooting is now in progress in 
tool and die shops in New York. 
Bridgeport, Providence. Cleveland 
and Chicago, based on a script that 
explains how household necessities, 
appliances, automobiles, etc. are 
made possible at low cost by the 
use of tools, dies, fixtures, molds, 
gauges, jigs and other special ma- 
chines. 

The story will show the progress 
of an apprentice through the 8.000 
hour course leading to journeyman. 
It is planned to educate industry 
and public on the role of the skilled 
tool and die technician in our econ- 
omy, as well as to encourage me- 
chanically inclined young men to 
become apprentices. 

Navajo Sound Track on Film 
Helps Sponsor Reach Tribes 

♦ Mtchi Tikoiii is the title of the 
first industrial film with a Navajo 
sound track. The recent film was 
produced for the El Paso Natural 
Gas Company by Polaris Pictures 
for showing to the Navajo tribes. 
The El Paso Gas Company built a 
pipe line through the Navajo coun- 
try and in so doing used many 
Navajo workers on its construction 
crews. 

The purpose of the film was to 
secure the good-will of the tribe. I 
was narrated by one of the Navajo 
chiefs, Paul Jones. The film itself 
consists of about seven and a half 
reels taken during construction of 
the line. \^'hen the company offered 
to make the picture, the tribal coun- 
cil was delighted and the only re- 



IMMEDIATE CASH 

FOR 

CAMERA EQUIPMENT 

NEED EYEMOS (SINGLE LENS AND TURRET). 
MITCHELLS, ARRIFLEX. DE BRIES, B»H STAND^ 
ARDS AND HI-SPEEDS. WALLS. AKELEYS, CINE 
SPECIALS. AURICONS, MAURERS. FILMOS. 
ALSO BALTARS, COOKE5 AND OTHER LENSES. 
SOUND STAGE. LABORATORY AND EDITING 
EQUIPMENT OF ALL TYPES REQUIRED. PLEASE 
SHIP INSURED OR FORWARD DESCRIPTIONS 
AIRMAIL IMMEDIATE PAYMENT. 

GORDON ENTERPRISES 

53i2 N. CAHUENGA • NORTH HOLLYWOOD, CAL. 
1953 PRODUCTION REVIEDi 



quirement they laid down was that 
it be good and long — so the Navajo 
version includes all of the clips that 
were eliminated from the other ver- 
sions of the film. 

The Indian narrator, who is a col- 
lege graduate, amazed officials of 
Polaris Pictures by watching the 
film, reading the script in English, 
and simultaneously translating it in- 
to Navajo. 

Southern Pine Association Film 
Shows Growth and Production 

♦ The first industry-wide motion 
picture on southern pine lumber. 
The Sound of America, has been re- 
leased by Southern Pine Associa- 
tion. Produced by the Calvin Com- 
pany. Kansas City, the 27-minute 
full-color film tells the story of 
Southern Pine from seedling to saw- 
timber to finished construction. 

Filmed in the forests and mills of 
the South The Sound of America 
shows the many steps involved in 
the growth and production of 
Southern Pine. It takes the audi- 
ence on a tour of the forests and 
mills. 

16mm prints are being made 
available by Southern Pine Asso- 
ciation. National Bank of Commerce 
Bldg.. New Orleans. La. 

Six New Color Filmstrips on 
Poultry Management Released 

♦ Tile .Audio- Visual Division of 
Popular Science Publishing Com- 
pany has released a series of six 
color filmstrips under the title of 
Poultry Management. Prepared with 
the cooperation of the Lniversity 
of Connecticut, its extension divi- 
sion, the U.S. Department of .-Vgri- 
culture and many commercial poul- 
trvraen. the films are designed to 
stimulate young men and women to 
think of the profession as a profit- 
able future and to acquaint oldsters 
with the values of sound, modern 
practices. Price of the series is 
.S31.50. 

Natl. Carbon Shows 

^^—^^— 2 New Product Films 

♦ Press previews of 
its two new color mo- 
tion pictures. Meeting 
the Challenge and By 
Way of Experience 
were held by the Na- 
tional Carbon Com- 
pany in early Febru- 
ary. Both films describe 
and demonstrate the 
nature, uses and prac- 
tical installation of the 
company's "Karbate" 
Impervious Graphite 
corrosion resistant 
equipment. Chemical 
and equipment design 
engineers are in the 
primary audience. 




In FILM... 







. . . there's no substitute 

/or EXPERIENCE 



EXPERIENCE 

when it comes to production, com- 
plete facilities, under one roof, assure 
results. 



EXPERIENCE 

when it comes to motivation of action 
through an effective film vehicle. 



EXPERIENCE 

wlieu it comes to getting the most out 
of your budget, whether for Industrial, 
Public Relations. Television or Train- 
ing Films. 



Bay State Film Productions, inc. 



BOSTON 



SPRINGFIELD 



MASSACHUSETTS 







/4n indi.spensible tool jor lelei 



niiln iij/ori/i against fluffs. 



New Business Tool: The TelePrompTer 

MECHANICAL PROMPTING DEVICES HELP TELEVISION, BUSINESS FILMS 



As OLD AS THE THEATRE, itself, is the fear 
of forgetting the lines of the play. As 
first aid against this problem, there have 
always been prompters, even as far back as the 
Roman era. 

Until the rise of television, the problem has 
never been acute — stage actors have plenty of 
time for rehearsal and learning scripts, radio 
actors read from the printed page and film ac- 
tors have been allowed almost unlimited fluffs 
and have performed only short lengths of 
"takes" at one time. 

Television, however, has been a different 
storv. and the mechanical prompter is quickly 
coming to be almost indispensable. These have 
been in various forms, from the simple black- 
board to tiny prompting receivers worn behind 
the performer's ear. But about 90 to 95% of 
prompting for television now is being handled 
by a new but booming company, TelePromp- 
Ter Corp. 

Barton's Brainchild Is Growing Lp 
Brainchild of actor Fred Barton, now presi- 
dent of the company, the TelePrompTer Corp. 
has grown from a tiny 10 by 20 foot office last 
year to a bulging .3.000 square feet of office 
space at present, in addition to a good sized as- 
sembling, engineering and script typing depart- 
ment in another building. To show how big the 
"gadget" has become, it is estimated that one 
network alone — CBS-TV — will spend some 
•SI. 400.000 in TelePrompTer fees this year. 

A complete TelePrompTer unit consists of 
four remote controlled, electronically-synchro- 
nized, script machines that are controlled bv an 



operator from a fixed positioned master control 
unit. Three of these machines can be moved at 
will in any direction around a set so as to fol- 
low the action and dialogue. Proper placement 
of these units at all times makes it impossible 
for the viewer to tell that an actor is reading. 

Proper placement is achieved by the knowl- 
edge of a skilled operator who works with the 
producer just as electrician and cameraman do. 
The reader units are mounted on rubber-tired 
tripods and can be "dollied" or "panned" when 
necessary — or even hung from the rafters as 
was done recently for a puppet show. 

Each unit is powered by a selsyn drive motor 




These Four Script Machines com- 
prise complete TelePrompTer unit. 



which synchronizes the rollers that hold the 
script. In addition, an exclusive inter-unit syn- 
chronized system insures constant linc-for-line 
synchronization on all four machines. This 
means that an actor can refer to any machine at 
any time and always be sure that the arrow 
pointer on each machine is pointing to the exact 
line that he is speaking. 

Other Firms Holpi-ii in DcM'lof.nient 
An amazing amount of research went in the 
mechanical development of the TelePrompTer. 
The Underwood Corp. built special typewriters 
that type letters over an inch high, in four 
copie.s. and can be operated at 50 words a min- 
ute. The Standard Register Company, after ex- 
tensive testing, developed special yellow "video 
Ijond" paper, carbons and inks that insure maxi- 
nmm legibility in all four copies. To insure ex- 
act synchronization in all four reader units on 
the set a synchronous device is used which has 
contact points in the TelePrompTer to regulate 
the electric motors and conductive strips at regu- 
lar and frequent intervals printed on the forms. 
It is interesting that this is the first known ap- 
plication of electrically conductive ink to paper 
by a standard high-speed rotary press. The Tele- 
PrompTer paper, may, incidentally, be spliced, 
allowing for last minute deletions, corrections or 
additions. 

Though television was the instigator of re- 
search on the TelePrompTer and is now its chief 
customer, the company's executives, president 
Barton, and vice-presidents Irving Kahn and 
Hubert J. Schlafly. Jr. (the latter two were ex- 
ecutives of 20th Century-Fox, and Mr. Schlafly 
still is) foresee even greater use in the field of 
business speaking and certain adoption as a 
standard practice in the motion picture industry. 

Available Nationally for Business Use 

RCA Service Company. Inc. is now handling 
TelePrompTer service on a national basis for 
sales meetings, conventions, merchandise presen- 
tations, sales training courses, stockholder meet- 
ings, forums, after dinner speeches, etc. (Busi- 
ness Screen, No. 8, 1952, p. 59). It has been 
used by major business executives during the 
past few months to almost unanimous and heart- 
felt satisfaction. One corporation president 
pointed out that it not only made his speech 
more effective and easy of delivery but it com- 
pletely released him from the pre-speech head- 
aches of 100% memorizing and agonizing fear 
of "forgetting his lines." 

TelePrompTer now has offices in New York, 
Hollywood and Washington, will soon expand 
to service not only film producers and TV sta- 
tions in all major cities in the U. S. but in 
Europe and South America as well. The ma- 
chines are not sold but are rented as a package 
of four reader units, a master control panel, a 
monitor and operator (all I.A.T.S.E. union men, 
incidentally) for a fee of S30 per hour. 

TelePrompTer offers a cost-saving solution to 
many problems of the producer of sponsored 
films. It permits such non-professionals as com- 
pany executives to appear on a set. give a good 
un-rehearsed performance that defies detection 
of script reading in a matter of but a few min- 
utes more than the performance will last on the 
screen. Two examples: a board chairman sched- 



BUSINE.S.S .SCREEN MAGAZINE 




. A Bl SI\ESS SCREEN PRODI CTION REVIEW EEATLRE . 

Canadian Film Production During 1952 

ESTIMATE 500 EILMS PRODUCED Dl RING GOOD YEAR NORTH OF BORDER 



Master Co.ntrol LMt w electronUally-synchro- 
nized uilh script machines. 

uled to appear in a film for six minutes was on 
and off the set in fourteen minutes; the president 
of an electrical company was in and out of the 
studio ill one hour, both leaving a good per- 
formance completed in the cameras. This has 
been known by many a producer to take from 
one to three days to achieve. 

But TelePrompTer is not only useful to ama- 
teurs, it has proved itself invaluable to such re- 
laxed professional performers as Arthur God- 
frey. Raymond Massey, Sir Cedric Hardwicke 
and Helen Hayes. The producers of Dragnet, a 
television program made on film, estimate that 
the prompters save up to 50"r of the time re- 
quired to ""can" a half hour show per week. On 
one occasion. TelePrompTers enabled one take 
of 1.000 ft. I35nmi) to be made. 

A major studio tested the machines by film- 
ing two sets of actors, one using prompters 
without memorizing the script, and the other 
speaking after considerable rehearsal. Studio ex- 
ecutives could not tell afterwards which actors 
had been "prompted." 

Another film use of mechanical prompters 
that offers some advantage is in narration of 
'"voice-over" films, especially where timing is of 
great importance. .\ prompter can be set up just 
adjacent to the screen, and being perfectly vis- 
ible, it allows the narrator to exactly correlate 
picture and narration without having to '"look 
down"" at his script continually. 

Watch the screen, next lime you see a spon- 
sored film. If the actors, or the sponsor, him- 
self, look particularly relaxed and happy about 
the whole thing, chances are they're peeking at 
a TelePrompTer when you don't know it. 5^ 

TELEPROMPTER In ACTION is easily folloived 
uithoul looking away from camera lens. 




CANADIAN Film Production is on the up- 
swing. It is estimated that .500 films were 
produced last year for industry, govern- 
ment and education while the recent inaugural of 
Canadian TV will soon provide new impetus 
for sponsors. 

Largest number of Canada's producers are 
located in Toronto and these include Capitol 
Film Productions with Toronto's best studio, 
Audio Pictures who specialize in theatre trailers 
and lab work. Shelly Films with its large 
lab. Peterson Productions. Ashley & Crippen. 
Graphics Associates (animation specialists) and 
Thatcher Films. 

12 Companies Do Most of Work 

Montreal has Canada's oldest producer and 
largest lab. Associated Screen News. Omega Pro- 
ductions and Vega Films are also well known 
in Montreal. Ottawa is the home of Crawlev 
Films and the National Fihii Board, who between 
them turn out nearly 40% of Canada's informa- 
tional fihns. 

In the West there are Syni Studios. P.G.A. 
Films and Francis Holmes in Winnipeg. Dick 
Bird in Regina and Lew Parry Productions and 
Trans-Canada Films in Vancouver. Atlantic 
Films began business recently in St. John's, New- 
foundland. And across Canada are many other 
companies, growing and challenging the more 
established segments of the industry. 

The yellow pages of Canada's phone books list 
65 producers from coast to coast, but most work 
is done by a dozen established companies and 
the .National Film Board. 

The leading industrial producers belong to 
the Association of Motion Picture Producers and 
Laboratories of Canada. 

.•\mong the 27 companies which make up this 
trade associalion, are such interested parties as 
Canadian Kodak, Ansco and Gaevert. Under the 
presidency of F. R. Crawley of Ottawa, the 
association has had an excellent year and its 
quarterly business meetings ha\e dealt with a 
variety of matters vital to the industry — tele- 
vision, music rights, processing, sales tax, dutv 
on film stock and equipment, film awards, dis- 
tribution, relations with government, etc. 

Governments Take An Active Interest 

The National Film Board continues to turn 
out a tremendous number of government films 
and is Canada's largest producer by far. Most 
of the Provincial governments now produce a 
few films each year, most active being Quebec, 
Saskatchewan, Alberta and British Columbia. 

Typical of Canada's growing business film 
industry is the record of Crawley Films Limited 
of Ottawa. Toronto and Montreal. Last \ear 
(their fourteenth I they ( omplcled .5.'5 films. 90'^'r 
in color and 20' t. in French, .\verage lengtli 
was 22 minutes. Working with the mo.st modern 
equipment and a full-time staff of 63, during 



the year they captured no less than eleven 
awards at national and international film fes- 
tivals, a record envied by many large U. S. pro- 
ducers. 

Recently their work has become international 
in scope. They have just finished a film on in- 
dustrial Brazil while another film for .Muminum 
Limited took their crews to British Guiana, Ja- 
maica, Trinidad, England and from coast to 
coast in Canada. They have made two films for 
Silva Inc. of Sweden, ten for McGraw-Hill, three 
for Encyclopaedia Britannica. and twenty for 
the International Film Bureau of Chicago. 

There are a number of other signs that film- 
ing is attaining a new stature in Canada. The 
Dominion Bureau of Statistics is doing its first 
complete survey of Canadian film production 
and the figures are awaited with tremendous 
interest. Stories on the industry are carried in 
such leading business papers as FlNANCLAL Post, 
Monetary Times, and Marketing. Canadun 
Business, published by the Canadian Chamber 
of Commerce, carries a monthly column of re- 
views of industrial fihns under the column head- 
ing "Business in Motion". 

4tli .\nniial Canadian Film Awards 
The four-year-old Canadian Film .Awards have 
.sparked a great deal of interest. Jointiv spon- 
sored by the Canada Foundation, the Canadian 
Fim Institute and the Canadian Association for 
.'Vdult Education, the presentations were made 
one year by Prime Minister Louis St. Laurent, 
another year by Toronto-born Mary Pickford. 

In 19.52 the awards were swept by the Na- 
tional Film Board and Crawley Films. The NFB 
took first award for Theatrical Features with 
Royal Journey, first for Theatrical Shorts with 
Opera School and first for Non-Theatrical Gov- 
ernment-Sponsored with .Milk Made for the De- 
partment of -Agriculture. 

Largest number of entries was for the category 
of Non-Theatrical Non-Government-Sponsored. 
The top award went to Crawley's Packaged 
Power for Aluminum Limited. The Non-The- 
atrical Open was won by Crawley's .\ewlound- 
land Scene for Imperial Oil. and this film then 
(rONTIMFTl ON Tl!' .,,11 •>•(•'.. rVCE) 




' R O I) I C T I N R E \ I E W 



113 



Canadian Films in 1952: 

(CONTINUED FROM THE PRECEDING PAGE) 

went on to be chosen In ihi' ( imiliiiicd boards 
of judges as Canadian I'iliii i>f llic ^Cai. "rcprr- 
senting the highest arhioMMiicnl in Canadian 
Fihii Productions." 

Reaching the Caiiailian Aiidiome 

There arc a variety of methods of distributing 
sponsored lihus in Canada. Large active libraries 
are maintained by such companies as Bell Tele- 
phone. (Canadian Industries Limited. Canadian 
General Llectric. Canada Cement, Alumiiiuin 
Company, B. C. Electric and others. Benograpli 
of Montreal operates a commercial distribution 
service, handling the Canadian end of Modern 
Talking Picture Service, Inc. Most provincial 
libraries eagerly accept good sponsored films. 
Some sponsors lean heavily on Canada's huge 
network of 334 film councils and 3-13 community 
film libraries. 

But the most potent method is the distribu- 
tion system of the National Film Board. If a 
film has national significance, is interesting and 
informative and contains no advertising other 
than title credits to the sponsor, the NFB will 
accept prints and distribute them nationally 
without charge. With 28 prints they will reach 
a guaranteed minimum audience of 300,(X)0 but 
a popular subject can reach anything up to a 
million in five years. 

They have already racked up impressive totals 
for many sponsors. Newfoundland Scene has 
reached 308,000 in its first 14 months and man) 
other sponsored films distributed by NFB are 
now in the many hundreds of thousands. 

1952 was a good year for Canadian producers. 
All indications point to a better one in 1953. It 
is good to see that Canadian industry, govern- 
ment and education are giving such recognition 
to the film medium. 8' 




WnldnrI Astoria 



Film GM Motorama in Record Time 

SOUND MASTERS DELIVERS COMPLETED TV NEWS SHOW IN 24 HOURS 

18 



Million and More People are seeing 
General Motors' Motorama of 1953 
via television, theatrical and plant 
newsreels. and a special one-reel theatrical short 
subject which recapture all of the glamour and 
interest of the brilliant opening day program in 
New York's Waldorf Astoria Grand Ballroom. 
Complete film coverage of this colorful exposi- 
tion of the General Motors 1953 automotive 
products was the kind of challenging assignment 



Meeting the GM Deadline uas the problem shared by Sound Masters' 
president Harold Wondsel (left) v.p. Francis C. Wood, Jr. anil Frank 
Donovan, director, shown during Motorama production. 



which required all the production skill, speed of 
operation, and discrimination only an experi 
enced producer can muster. 

When General Motors Public Relations De- 
partment commissioned Sound Masters. Inc., fo 
this top assignment they laid out specific objec 
lives. Scenes of VIPs. celebrities were requested 
in addition to complete coverage of the show it- 
self and its seven special and experimental cars 
as well as special exhibits that emphasized en 

Special Car Setup featuring Cadillac's "LeMans" with (I to r) Frank 
Donovan. James Fitzsimons, asst. cameraman; and Gerald Hirschfeld, 

cameraman. Six other special car seijuences were filmed. 




BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



AN EXAMPLE OF SPONSOR-PRODUCER COOPERATION 




Top Personalities glimpsed were (I to r) Charles E. Wilson, now Secre- 
tary of Defense, Arthur Godfrey, and Harlow H. Curtice, president of 
General Motors shown tvith Sound Masters' president. Harold Wondsel. 



gineering. Speed and quality of 
production were essential and the 
release of this material had to be 
made within 24 hours in order to be 
"news" for the television networks. 

On Saturday. January IT the big 
show opened and filniing began of 
the stage show at noon. Interference 
with the opening day crowd of 
55.000 New Yorkers and with the 
expensive artistic lighting effects, 
etc. was strictly prohibited. SM 
crew members and directors solved 



the problem by shooting from the 
balcony, using eight different fast 
lenses, fast film and adding arc 
lights to the stage show. Standby 
crews in the lab developed and 
printed material as it was fed to 
them. First rushes hit the screen at 
noon on Saturday and final scenes 
came from the laboratory at 9 p.m. 
that night. A dozen fine grain prints 
were ready to go to the news serv- 
ices at midnight Saturday and on 
Mondav the release prints were out 
and on the television screens. ^ 



Checking Buck's "XP 300"' are Mr. Wondsel, Charles E. Chayne, v.p. in 
charge of engineering at CM, Mr. Donovan, and John Ford of GM's De- 
partment of I'ulilic Relations, in charge of audio-visuals. 




Better Tape 

Minnesota Mining & Mfg. Co. 
Announces "High Output" lypo 

* A new magnetic recording tape, 
termed "the first major advance in 
magnetic tape since the adoption of 
red oxide," has been announced by 
the Minnesota Mining and Mani- 
I ACTi RING Co. of St. Paul. Minne- 
Mita. producers of "Scotch" brand 
-uund recording tapes and leading 
ileveloper <jnd manufacturer of 
iiiagnetic tapes. 

Employing a more potent mag- 
netic material, the new, green-col- 
ored tape has more than double the 
output of any other tape on the mar- 
ket, increasing significantly the 
available signal to noise ratio, with 
no increase in harmonic distortion 
ur tape thickness. 

Full Recording Range 
The new tape, designated 
"Scotch" brand No. 120 "High Out- 
put"* magnetic recording tape, is 
designed especially for use in radio, 
television and recording studio, in 
computer work and in other record- 
ing applications. 

Its increased signal-to-noise ratio 
makes possible a full dynamic 
range recording, allowing repro- 
duction of very soft tones with vir- 
tually none of the background noise 
caused by the high amplification 
hitherto needed for recording low 
intensity sounds. The tape produces 
at least 8 and up to 12 decibles, or 
a minimum of 133 per cent, more 
output than any conventional mag- 
netic tape over the entire range of 
the audio spectrum at a given dis- 
tortion level. 

High Fidelity — Low Cost 

Musical recordings of higher 
quality are made possible by the 
new "High Output" tape, which re- 
cords from the softest pianissimo 
passage to a mighty crescendo with- 
out background amplification noise 
and with distortion content held to 
a minimum. 

The tape offers to the high fidel- 
ity enthusiast truly high fidelity re- 
( ording without the great expense 
involved in buying costly amplifiers 
LOW necessary to obtain a very wide 
signal-lo-noise ratio, and signifi- 
cantly better recordings at lower 
speeds. 

In the field of pulse recording, 
where accurate low intensity sound 
recording is essential, the "High 
Output" tape will enable manufac- 
turers of electronic computing 
equipment to get improved pulse 
definition and to keep signals high 

'Trademark 



enough above noise level for more 
accurate work. 

The "High Output" tape is coat- 
ed with a new, higher remanence 
pigment, and is well below the 
standard maximum thickness re- 
quired for professional or high 
quality recording. Dark green in 
color, it is impossible to confuse it 
with the red oxide coated tapes. It 
has the same coercivity. frequency 
response, erasability and print ra- 
tio as the standard No. Ill tape, 
and no change in bias is necessary 
to obtain maximum results from the 
new tape on machines now set for 
optimum bias on No. 111. 

Minimum of Lubrication 
Due to its enhanced magnetic 
properties, significantly better re- 
cordings can also be produced with 
the "High Output" tape at lower 
recording speeds. Its special "dry 
lubrication" process prevents 
squealing on critical machines and 
gives it operating stability under 
conditions of high temperature and 
humidity. 

List price for "Scotch" No. 120 
"High Output" sound recording 
tape is S7 for the 1200-foot length, 
S13 for the 2400-foot length on the 
NARTB hub. and S15.85 on the 
NARTB reel. (The 1200-foot length 
of the No. Ill tape lists at S5.50.) 
The new tape w as made generally 
available the first week in Febru- 
ary. 

New Arc Welding Filmstrlps 
Produced at Lincoln Electric Co. 

♦ The Audio-Visual Division of 
Poi'iLAR Science in cooperation 
with the Lincoln Electric Com- 
pany, has prepared a new, color 
filmstrip series called Arc Welding 
that should be of interest to indus- 
trial training directors. 

.\11 scenes were shot at the mod- 
ern plant of Lincoln Electric Com- 
pany and in well-equipped shop 
rooms of several vocational schools. 
The -series is composed of three ti- 
tles: Electric Arc Welding and How 
It Helps Man. Selecting and Using 
Arc U elding Equipment, and Prac- 
ticing Arc Welding. 

The intent of Arc Welding is to 
provide essential teaching material 
on modern arc welding methods. 
The three filmstrips trace develop- 
ment of arc welding, its place and 
importance in modem industry, 
step-by-step techniques of each op- 
eration, facts about adjustment, care 
and selection of tools and materials. 

Price of the films, plus teaching 
guides and box container, is S19.50. 
It is available from Popular Science 
Publishing Company, 353 Fourth 
Avenue, New York. 



1953 PRODUCTION REVIEW 



115 




Calendar of 1953 Film Festivals 

HOW TO SUBMIT ENTRIES AT BOSTON AND CLEVELAND 



Motion Pictures 

Slidefilms 

TV Films 

Visual Aids 



Public Relations 
fTfif Employee Relations 
Dealer Relations 
Market Promotion 



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465 California Street 
San Francisco 4 



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♦ Additional copies of this 3rd supply lasts) at Sl.OO per copy. 



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are available (while the limited 



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companies order. Order today! 



Boston's 1953 Film Festival to 
be Held at Sheraton Plaza May 2 

♦ riic Film Council of Greater Bos- 
ton Mill hold its Third Annual Fihn 
Festival on Saturday. May 2. at the 
Sheraton Plaza Hotel in Boston. 
Films released since January L 
1952 v\ill he considered for awards 
in these classifications: adult edu- 
cation, classroom, music, art, and 
industry, including training and 
public relations films. Members of 
the festival audience will select by 
ballot first and second award films 
in each classification. All other films 
will receive awards of merit since 
only outstanding films will be se- 
lected for showing at the festival. 
How to submit films: preview 
prints for consideration must be 
sent by April 1 to the Council sec- 
retary. Mrs. Muriel C. Javelin, c o 
Boston Public Library. Boston 17. 
.Mass. 

Sixth Annual Cleveland Festival 
to be Held on June 17 and 18 

♦ Cleveland's first two-day 16mm 
film festival I also said to be the 
first of its kind in the United 
States I will be held at the Hotel 
Carter in Cleveland on June 17 and 
18. Sponsor is the Cleveland Film 
Council in affiliation with the 
Cleveland Chamber of Commerce 



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Clarence J. Dover 
Cleveland Festival Chairman 

and the Film Council of America. 
"Oscars" will be awarded to the 
best films in 15 categories accord- 
ing to weighted votes of the viewing 
audiences. The categories in which 
films are grouped include: laiv, gen- 
eral health, menial health, safety, 
intergroup relations, religion, ex- 
perimental, sales promotion, public 
relations, industrial training, indus- 
trial engineering, teaehing and class- 
room, science, arts and crafts, and 
travel. 

Key Facts for F.ntrants 
How to submit films: Clarence J. 
Dover, first vice-president of the 
Cleveland Film Council and chair- 
man of the Si.\th Annual Festival, 
notes that requests for entry blanks 
should be sent as soon as possible 
to Harold R. Nissley. general 
screening chairman. 3514 Radcliffe 
Road. Cleveland Heights. Ohio. 
Nisslev will return entry blanks and 
the name of the individual category 
chairman. Films should not be sent 
until they are requested. No charge 
is made for entries but organiza- 
tions submitting films are asked to 
pay transportation costs both ways 
on films which are requested. 

Qualified committees will be se- 
lected in each category to screen 
films and select a three-hour run 
for the festival. Deadline for screen- 
ings is April 9. Because the pur- 
pose of the festival is to provide a 
showcase for the latest and best 
16mm films for program chairmen, 
training directors, teachers and 
others, films released since 1951 
and running less than 30 minutes 
will be given preference for final 
festival showing. 

Cleveland's Fihn Council was a 
jiioneer sponsor i>f the film festival 
in the L. S. 9 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



How to Submit Films for Awards 



DATA ON SAFETY AND FREEDOMS FOUTSDATION AWARDS 



Stamford Holds 4th Annual Film 
Festival Next May 22, 1953 

♦ Awards will be presented to out- 
standing films in six categories at 
the Fourth Annual Film Festival, to 
be sponsored by the Stamford Film 
Council on May 22, at Stamford, 
Connecticut. 

How to submit films: Entry blanks 
can be obtained from the Council 
at 96 Broad Street. Stamford, Conn., 
and must be filed by March 25. All 
entries must fall into one of the 
following categories: sports and 
travel, classroom films, adult edu- 
cation, religion, public relations and 
industry, or the arts. 

Each 16mm sound film submitted 
will be pre\iewed by a committee of 
specialists and laymen who will se- 
lect films to be shown at the fes- 
tival. Only those fihns felt to be top 
calibre will be requested for show- 
ing and each will receive an award 
of merit. The top film in each cate- 
gory will receive a "first award," 

Film Council of America Clears 
Edinburgh and Venice Entries 

♦ Representation of L. S. films at 
the Edinburgh and Venice interna- 
tional film exhibitions was handled 
for the first time last year by the 
Fihn Council of America. At press- 
time, the Council was continuing to 
serve as the coordinating agency in 
the U, S, for these events, submit- 
ting American non- government, 
non-theatrical films to the 1953 fes- 
tivals in both countries. 
How to submit films: just as soon 
as Official Instruction and Entry 
blanks are released by the Foreign 
Festival organi2ations concerned, 
copies may be obtained from head- 
quarters' office of the Film Council 
of America. Write to J. Margaret 
Carter, c o FCA offices at 600 Da^ is 
Street, Evanston, Illinois for these 
materials and to register in ad- 
vance. Time is a key factor, how- 
ever, because these films must be 
processed through the FCA's Na- 
tional Film Preview Panels. Dead- 
line for submitting films has been 
set as April 7, 1953. Both Festivals 
are held in late suimner. 

National Committee on Films 
for Safety Now Judging Entries 

♦ The outstanding motion pictures 
and slidefilms relating to safety edu- 
cation, including traffic, home, 
farm, industrial safet)', etc., are se- 
lected each year by the National 
Committee on Films for Safety with 



headquarters at 425 N. Michigan 
Avenue. Chicago 11. 111. 

Deadline for 1952 film entries 
uas February 23. 1953. If anv ex- 
tension is wanted within a few days 
of that time, contact should be made 
through William Englander, secre- 
tary for the committee, c 'o the Na- 
tional Safety Council in Chicago. 

All films will be returned via 
Railway Express collect early in 
April, as soon as possible after 
final judging. Announcement of 
winning films is usually made on 
or about that date. 

Freedoms Foundation Is Accepting 
Entries for Awards on '53 Films 

♦ The Freedoms Foundation, Val- 
ley Forge. Pa., sponsors annual 
medal awards for 16mm motion pic- 
tures which, in the estimation of 
a distinguished jury of prominent 
Americans, have made the greatest 
contribution during the year to an 
understanding of the American wav 
of life. 

This year's Freedom's awards I a 
partial listing appears on page 53 1 
were made at ceremonies held on 
Washington's Birthday at Valley 
Forge. Entries of 1953 productions 
will be accepted until November of 
this year at the Foundation's head- 
quarters. If rile for entry bknks and 
further infonnation to the address 
given above. D" 



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FILM DISTRIBUTION: ITS 


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♦ Featured in the March issue of 


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Business Screen will be a com- 


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"Out of the North" 

AN MPO PRODI CTION FOR NASH MTRS. 
Sponsor: Nash Motors 

Title: Out of the North, 25 iiiin. color, produced 
liy Ml'O Productions, Inc. 

■^ It is doubtful if any films have been more in 
demand in the past three years than Nash Mo- 
tors' two films. Fishing in Alaska and Hunting 
in Alaska. They have been called the greatest 
hunting and fishing films ever made — ^and with 
some justification. Their immediate success, both 
as fine films and as sales promotion vehicles, 
prompted Nash to plan another picture that 
would follow wildfowl from their breeding 
grounds in Canada to wintering places in the 
south. 

This film, which has been in production for 
three years, was finally released this month. It 
is called Out oj the North, and it is just about 
the best thing of its kind that has ever been 
done. It begins up near the Arctic Sea as 
spring thaws the marshes and muskeg lakes and 
the ducks and geese arrive back from the south. 
Soon a hush falls over the marsh — the time for 
concealment, the stealthy quiet of the laying sea- 
son. After the goslings and ducklings break out 
of their shells, they begin the lessons of trials and 
experiment, learning from the grown birds how 
to dive or dabble, tip or scoop, for food. 

As summer comes, and new flight feathers 
appear, the flocks whirl in trial flights, preparing 
with order and discipline for migration. Until. 
overnight, summer is gone, frost is on the bar- 
rens, and the flocks climb the sky and wheel 
away on the wind southward, along the age old 
flyways. If wings passed that way of old. they 
pass that way now. 

The gunners — who have planned all year for 
this time — wait for them, call to them, and take 
man's toll. But the abundant survivors finally 
reach the "places without fear" — in Louisiana. 
Stuttgart. Arkansas, or even farther, in \ucutan. 

Out oj the North should be winning friends 
for Nash for dozens of years to come. It is time- 
less, and as beautifully portrayed as a flock of 
Blue Geese on the wing. 

Distribution of the Nash film program is han- 
dled by Modern Talking Picture Service. Inc. 



"Roy Rogers, King of the Cowboys" 
Wins Visual Presentation First Award 

■^ Winners of the first national Visual Sales 
Presentation .\wards contest were announced at 
a recent luncheon of the Sales Executives Club 
of New York. First and second prizes, consist- 
ing of suitably engraved plaques along wilh a 
shelf of books on advertising and selling, were 
classified in three categories. 

First prize for the best oral sales presentation 
was awarded to Esquire Socks. Division of 
Chester H. Rolh Co., Inc. Seventeen Mac.\zine 
won second place. 

In the category, "best presentation other, than 
motion picture, where all or some of the sales 
talk is incorporated mechanically," the National 



VISl AL PRESENTATION AWARD WINNERS 




Receiving .\ward PLAytE are (I to rl Ted Cate 
of Cate & McGlone. producer: Conrad Krebs of 
Roy Rogers Enterprises; and Reg Evans, repre- 
senting the National Visual Presentation Associ- 
ation which made selection. 

Broadcasting Co. was honored with first place. 
Taking second, was the Metropolitan Sunday 
Newspapers Inc. 

"Best motion picture sales presentation of 
1952'" was awarded the film of Roy Rogers En- 
terprises. Hollywood. The Roy Rogers film was 
produced by Cate & McGlone of Hollywood. In 
this classification, a General Electric Company 
presentation was given a second award. 

Before presenting the awards, moderator Sid- 
ney W. Edllnd, president of the organization, 
stated that "it is the power of visual presenta- 
tions when properly used to generate business 
that would otherwise be lost." 

The panel of experts who served as judges 
were: Fen K. Doscher, vice president in charge 
of sales, Lily-Tulip Cup Corp.; Harold L. De- 
Benham. manager, general sales depaitment. 
Sunshine Biscuits, Inc.; Reg Evans, vice presi- 
dent, Ad-Film Distributors, Inc.; Walter Bru- 
nauer. director of sales personnel development, 
Lily-Tulip Cup Corp.; and W. Harry .Alexander, 
management consultant. ^ 



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BUSINESS SCREEN MAG.\ZINE 



Dowling Sound Slidefilm Presents 
Basic Public Relations Ideas 

♦ Basic {jrinciplfs of huniaii rela- 
tions are explained in Public Rela- 
tions jor Business and Professional 
People, a sound slidefilni in color, 
produced liy Pat Dowling Pic- 
tubes of Los Angeles. The film is 
especially intended for people who 
may be self-employed as well as for 
companies employing a few hun- 
dred persons. 

Defining the difference between 
publii' relations and the "tools" of 
communication, the film singles out 
a ".Mr. Yesterliver" as an example 
of one who tries to handle human 
relations policies as Grandpa did. 
\lso outlined are some of the com- 
mon misconceptions of human l>e- 
havior which science has uncovered, 
principles which the business and 
professional [MTson can put to use. 
and the procedure followed to be- 
{jin a public relations program. 

.Author of the production is Roy 
J. Leffincwklu director of public 
relations for the Hawaiian Sugar 
Planters" .Association and a mem- 
ber of the board of the Public Re- 
lations Society of America. Illustra- 
tions in color cartoon form were 
done by Honolulu artist. Raymond 
K. Lantkrman. formerly a Chicago 
illustrator. Distribution information 
may be obtained from Pat Dowling 
Pictures. 1056 S. RoberLson Blvd.. 
I. OS Angeles .'^5. 

New Sarro Film Deals With Color 

♦ The role pkni-il li\ lolor in every- 
dav living is the subject of a film 
being produced in Sarra's Chicago 
studios. Described as a "fihn pag- 
eant of color," the motion picture 
will feature Harold Lloyd and 
other noted personalities as they in- 
terpret color uses and trends in their 
particular fields. Sponsor is the 
Martin-Senour Company. 

Fielils represented in the film 
will l)c interior decoration, fabrii 
design, industrial design, anhiler. 
lure, publishing, industrial en<;i' 
neering. color physics, and relaterl 
field.s. The film will have its pre- 
miere in ("hicago at the March i on- 
vention of the Painting and Decor- 
ating Contractors. 

Squibb Film Explains Antibiotics 
to Layman on Non-Medical Level 

♦ Pe.ii. illin a>id ..ll.rr antibiotics, 
now taken for graiitcil by the la>- 
man. are explained to .Mr. and Mrs. 
•Average Citiwn in the new E. R. 
Svl iHit \M) Sons sponsored film. . . . 
Ami the f.nrlh Shall Give Hack Life. 
The highly teihnical and amazing 
process of manufacturing wonder 
drugs, such as penirillln. is simply 



and dramatically presented in this 
2.S minute. 1 6mm sound fihn. 

Produced by the I^OLIS l)K 
KociiF.MONT Corporation, this 
film explains clearly and siniplv 
where, when, and how the antibio- 
tics are used. The struggle lietween 
disease organisms and the wonder 
drugs is graphically sho»n. and 
the audience is permitted to look 
through the new electron micro- 
si-ope and watch the fantastic rate 
at which disease organisms repro- 
<luce themselves. 

This free film is excellent for 
showing to church groups, service 
and luncheon clubs, schools, etc. 
. . . Anil the Earth Shall Cite Back 
l.ije is available from the 27 na- 
tional oiri.es of Ideal Pictures Cor- 
poration b\ writing to the home of- 
fice located at 65 East South Water 
Street, ('hicago 1. Illinois. 

Death of Bud Pollard Announced 

* f ilni industrv frii-rhl> vvcrt- sad- 
dened recenlU li) the death of Bud 
Pollard, first president of the 
Screen Directors Guild of New 
\ork. In addition to being one of 
the founders and first president of 
the .*^creen Directors Guild, he was 
a charier member of Film Editors 
Local 771. I.ATSE. a member of 
\(»VA and of the Picture Pioneers. 
I ntil a few years ago he was asso- 
I iated with .A.stor Pictures of New- 
York and more recently was pur- 
suing his career in Hollywood. 



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CASK lllsroKlKS OF BrSINKSS FILMS 

Monsanto Shows MPO's "Garden Wise" 

for Consumer Promotion of Krilinm 

Sponsor: Monsanto Chpmical Company. 

Tillo: Garden Wise, 25 niin. rolor. produced 

l>v Ml'O Productions. Inr. 
if When Monsanto introduced its synthetic 
chemical soil conditioner. Krilium. a little over 
a year ago. it presented, conjointly, an "un- 
planned" motion picture. Soil Structure — Key to 
Productivity, that told of the research and de- 
velopment that went into the product. Two mil- 
lion people have seen the film since then, and 
wondered at the way Krilium "fixes" the soil 
for better crops. 

But, Monsanto was not long without competi- 
tors, and now with several dozen "' — ium" soil 
conditioning products of varying effectiveness 
on the market, the company is ready with a new 
film, aimed at home gardeners, which it will 
promote for the widest possible audience. 

Garden Wise, which has been in production 
since last May, has the expressed purpose of get- 
ting people to go right out and buy Krilium. It 
is visual advertising, but of a most palatable 
brand. It's a little story about a young couple 
who move into a new house and hopefully plan 
their garden for the coming spring. Neighbors 
advise them that their soil isn't too good, but 
they say. as she puts it, "We think it's just 
lovely." 

It's a disastrous spring in the young couple's 
garden. The ground either bakes hard, or floods, 
and such plants as come up at all look abused 
and starving. 

But enter Krilium. on the neighbor's advice, 
and the soil becomes, indeed, "lovely." The 
stuff reallv works, and the new garden and 
sloping lawn prosper. R' 



Freedoms Foundation Winner Tells 
Basic Philosophy for Free Enterprise 

+ The American Economic Foundation offers 
the film. Backfire, 13^<; min, b/w, produced and 
distributed by the Princeton Film Center, Inc. 
Film is based on an actual classroom incident 
that seeks to prove the fallacy of the Marxian 
line: "From each according to his ability, to 
each according to his need." 



TYPE TITLES 

Produced up to 
o standord—not 
down to o price 

Knight Studio 

1 59 E. Chicago Ave. Chicago 1 1 



Thomas J. Shelly, an economics teacher at 
Yonkers High School, devised a unique system 
of grading tests in his classes as an experiment 
to disprove collectivist ideas that some of his stu- 
dents seemed to support. He averaged all the 
marks, taking from the best papers, giving to the 
failures, until all papers were exactly equal and 
just barely passing. 

Putting this socialistic system into actual prac- 
tice provided a clear lesson to the students that 
no two human beings are ever born with equal 
talents and abilities and that, because of this, 
their performance in life is bound to be unequal. 
It presents the proposition that the idea of pro- 
tecting mediocrity from its inevitable results is 
so plausible and charitable that millions of people 
support it without thinking it through. But, they 
fail to see that talent does not merely elevate the 
individual — it elevates the entire nation. 

As far as it goes. Backfire is an effective film 
that should provide considerable discussion 
wherever it is shown. And it will be shown 
widely — the A.E.F. estimates that five million 
people will see it this year. It is described as an 
effective thrust against one of Socialism's key 
theories, one that in this narrow sense, at least, 
would undoubtedly find agreement from a great 
majority of Americans. 

One question, however, that may arise is this: 
How far does the basic idea of the film seek to 
go? By implication, does it mean that such col- 
lectivist, "socialistic." if you will, programs as 
social security, the graduated income tax, the 
anti-trust acts and labor unions are entirely 
wrong and "un-American"? 

The film's entire purpose is to negate a theory 
which is not completely basic to even our most 
avid social planners. It seems to state that since 
"black" has been proven wrong, only "white" is 
right. The truth is that most Americans today 
do not believe in the completely unrestrained 
capitalism of the late 19th century any more than 
they believe in Marxian Socialism. Most of our 
accepted economic beliefs lie in a great gray area 
between the two extremes. Some films like this 
that go into battle against the extreme left often 
have the underlying purpose of damning by as- 
sociation every single social and economic change 
that has been made in the past century. ^ 

Editor's Note: at presstime Backfire received 
a 1953 Freedoms Foundation honor medal award. 




Training jFilms 



I E 



Specialists in 
Audio and Visual 
Presentations 



^150 WEST 54TH STREET 
^NEW YORK 19 • CO 5-3520 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



Fresh Approach to Subject 
Lifts a New Kaiser Film 



Greater New York Fund 
Shows Need for Service 



Sponsor: Kaiser Aluminum & 

Chemical Corp. 
Title: Take a Look at Tomorrow, 

20 mill., color. Produced by John 

Sutherland Productions. 
M When the Kaiser Aluminum 
Company decided to make a film 
about its product, it faced a problem 
not uncommon to many another 
sponsor — it had already been done. 
"How aluminum is produced" was 
already recorded on the films of at 
least two other major aluminum 
companies and Kaiser commission- 
ed John Sutherland Productions to 
find a siimewhat fresher approach. 

Take a Look at Tomorrow is the 
result. Twenty-minutes of anima- 
tion and live action feature "Alum- 
inum" as a circus performer and 
magician and gives "him" an op- 
portunity to stretch, twist, bend — to 
show, in short, that aluminum is 
a lightweight, glamorous champion, 
outdistancing competitors Iron Man 
McCinty and Chief Copperhead. 

The method of mining aluminum, 
extracting it from the ore. bringing 
it to the Kaiser plant are also pre- 
sented in animated sequences. Live 
action then takes over and shows 
aluminum processing. Some of the 
most satisfying parts of the film 
show in really excellent color how 
aluminum pigs are rolled, drawn, 
and extruded. .Another excellent 
scene: the steady progression of a 
traveling crane along the length of 
a huge rolling mill. 

Also examined are the varietv of 
ways aluminum can be used — struc- 
tural I-bars. cast and molded parts, 
even microscopicallv thin foil for 
household use. 

The film will be available to all 
interested groups. Distribution is 
being handled by the Kaiser sales 
offices and warehouse distributors 
througboul the countrv. 



Interested in Bricks? Here's 
Hanley's Story of The Product 



Sponsor: The Hanley Company. 
Title: When Belter Bricks Are 
Made. .30 min. color, produced 
by Campus Film Productions. 
■¥■ Anyone interested in bricks — 
architects, engineers, builders — 
will get the full treatment in this 
film. It .shows bricks of all sizes, 
shapes and colors and follows 
them from the mine to the top of a 
skyscraper. 

Good .scenes: mining clay with a 
machine that looks like nothing so 
much as a live crab: bricks being 
baked in a red hot kiln. ^ 



Sponsor: The Greater New York 

Fund. 
Title: A Thought jor Your Pennies, 
20 min., color, produced by Cam- 
pus Film Productions. 
■K Every year, at this time, the 
Greater New York Fund conducts 
a campaign to raise money for the 
423 separate charitable and welfare 
agencies which are associated with 
the Fund and which receive part of 
their support from the Fund. 

Several films are being used in 
this year's drive, for various pur- 
poses — television, theatres, and this 
one — A Thought for Your Pennies 
principally in business concerns 
for employee showings. (The Tele- 
phone Company, as an example, 
uses twenty prints for this purpose.) 

Ties in Suburban Groups 
Emphasis in A Thought ... is 
on the Greater New York aspect of 
the Fund, to encourage suburban 
dwellers who work in the city to 
consider contributing to the Fund 
as nmcb their responsibility as it is 
their city resident co-workers'. 

The film shows just what hap- 
pens to the money collected — Fam- 
ily Counseling .Services, Settlement 
Houses, the Institute of Crippled 
and Disabled being among those 
benefitted — and how necessary 
these activities are to the people of 
the city — you and me. perhaps. 

The script is by Ralph School- 
man, uho likes to write about peo- 
ple, and the direction by Nat Cam- 
pus, who makes his cameras shoot 
non-professional "actors" without 
scaring them to ilealh. ^ 



WooJ W. 



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♦ Complete, Fabricoid bound 
volumes of a complete year's 
issues of Business Screen are 
available for important .sponsor 
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While limited quantities last. 


you can order Volumes Eight, 
.Nine. Ten, Eleven. Twelve and 
Thirteen in this case-bound 
form at ST.50 per volume, sent 
postpaid if your check accom- 
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BlSINESS S( KEEN -~ 7(1(4 


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1953 PRODUCTION RKVIEW 



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245 West 55th Street 
New York 19, N. Y. 

Phone: PLaza 7-3868 




The Texas Company's Rural Program 
Features "Buckshot Goes to the Fair" 
Sponsor: The Texas Company 
Title: Buckshot Goes to the Fair, 30 min. color, 

produced by Audio Productions, Inc. 
■♦t Buckshot, when you meet him. is one of the 
biggest, fattest hogs ever seen on the screen. 
He's the hero of Texaco's new farm film, and 
though he isn't handsome, and unfortunately he 
doesn't gel the blue ribbon, he does form the 
principal interest in one of the best of Texaco's 
long series of farm subjects, than which there 
are none better. 

In fact, though Texaco aims these pictures at 
farm audiences, it is a shame to call them just 
"farm films." for their interest is as wide as 
America. I'p until now. the series has covered 
chickens, apples, dairy cows, beef cattle and 
hogs: next year it will be something else. We 
have an idea that people everywhere would like 
these pictures, and, perhaps, even city dwellers 
in particular. 

Buckshot is the proud possession of a young 
farm boy, who has beaten all local competition 
as the owner of the best hog in the county. Go- 
ing on to the State Fair, Buckshot doesn't win. 
but the boy learns a lot about hogs he never 
knew before and vows to cop the prize "next 
year." 

The film shows prize herds of each of the 
eight main types of hogs, explains the merits of 
each in highly informative fashion. H" 

CAREFREE YOUTH at the fair in a 
scene jrom "Buckshot Goes to Fair" 



ri— ^- 





oilel in Chrysler film 



Chry.sler Shows Design of Models 

in Colorful Film '"Starring in Style" 
Sponsor: Chrysler Corporation 
Film: Starring in Style, produced by Raphael 

G. Wolff Studios. 
■¥ This film is a stylish presentation of how cars 
are styled. The opening of the film is a Wolff 
Studios trade mark, setting the scene with some 
beautiful fast-motion scenes of dawn touching 
the Grand Canyon. This is followed by the be- 
fore-your-eyes opening of one of the most per- 
fect and most perfectly photographed roses you 
have ever seen. 

The points being made are: "What makes 
st\le? Wliat is beauty? And how are they ex- 
pressed? Then the film goes into the basic prob- 
lems of stvling. First considerations are the com- 
fort and safety of the passenger. When these 
have been taken care of, styling follows: It takes 
form first on the drawing board, then in clay 
mockups, then in full size wood and/or plastic 
models, and finally in a full scale model of the 
new car hand-made in steel. The finale of the 
film shows the new '53 line of Chrysler automo- 
biles and associates each with some other beau- 
tiful object, in a very interesting kaleidoscopic 
pattern of music and movement. 

The film is one of the more subtle ways of 
introducing the new '53 line of Chrysler cars, 
and it will be of interest to all types of audi- 
ences. A 35mm version will be shown in thea- 
tres, and several hundred 16mm prints have 
been placed with Modern Talking Pictures. Inc., 
for free loan distribution via 27 exchanges. ^ 



for those who want 



of distinction 



SAM ORLEANS PRODUCTIONS 

— CXPERIENCE since' igii* — 



116 ikw. 3nd itreat 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



Equipment for Four New TV 
Stations Delivered by Du Mont 

* A half iiiillion dolliir<) worth <>( 
1 V fi|ui|iiiK-nt was !>hip|>rd hy the 
A. H. I)l MlINT I-AllOKATIIRIKS t» 
four wiilrls «<-|>arat<-il l'. S. •auliuii.'-. 
Thesf ^hipiiifiits wiTr made early in 
January tt> TV hruadoaMrrs who 
wrrr anxiou-i tn get on the air a* 
early in I'^S'l a* possible. 

Aiiicinf; thoM- i'oinpanie<i which 
re<ei»e(l ei|uipMient from the Tele- 
vision Transmitter Division of the 
Du Miint Company were Old Pueblo 
Broadiasting Company, Tucson. 
.Arizona; Lynchburg Broadcasting 
("orporation, Lynchburg, Virginia; 

< "rnhuskcr Radio and Television 

< "rporation, Lincoln, Nebraska; 
and I'urblo Radio Company, Inc., 
I'uebl", Colorado. Kacli of these 
tiriMs reieivcd a 5 kW VHF televi- 
sion transmitter plu.s complete as- 
-"ciated station and studio units. 

Theatre TV Unit Cost $47,946 

* .\ l»*lf\ i>ioM ron>^ulling riiiiinitT. 
Ir'<tif>liig before the Federal Com- 
munications Commission last month 
estimated that the average cost to 
'•'|uip a theatre with large screen TV 

".I- «-i:,»i6. 

Manfred K. ToepjH-n, s|M-aking 
■1 Ix-half of the Motion I'iiture As- 
- '< iation and the National Exhib- 
itors Theatre Television Committee, 
wild are seeking allocations sf chan- 
nels for theatre TV networks, out- 
lined a tvpiial svsteni encompassing 
Zi3 theatres with a total of I..St2,- 
738 seats, located in New York, 
Philadelphia, Baltimore, Washing- 
Inn. \( ilmington. Atlantic Citv. 
Trenton. MUmIowm ami Reading. 
This network would take an invest- 
ment of SII.ITl.CXX) in order to Ih- 
fully equipped to operate. 

Girl Scoutt Issue Flip Charts 

* n»- (,irl Souls of Aiiirrica has 
issued a new «4'ri<-s of camp-craft 
training ilevires in the form of threi- 
sets of 12 b) LS inrh flip charts. 
Young cam|iers can take these 
charts out in the field and learn 
about iM-ihin/:, f'irr Huililinf; aii<l 
Primiliir ('.amf> Sanitalinn while 

".,1, il,.. I. .I." F.i. 1, s,t ,..si. y. 




II tHIII.Il A. Lll.NKI.I. 

Sarro's Chicago Rim Processing 
Laboratory Begins Second Year 
• ^...r.is s|„-, ij||>-.l.-,-r,.d (hi..! 
go film processing laboratory en- 
ters its second year of operation 
under the continued guidance of 
Hamlil A. I.ignell. who was in- 
strumental in its development. 

Coming to .America from Sweden 
in l'.>24, Mr. Ligiiell joined Burton 
Holmes Films. Inc. and was instru- 
mental ill expanding its laboratory 
services throughout the midwest. 
For several years he also served as 
the com|>any'9 principal motion pic- 
ture cameraman. 

In adilition, he worked closely 
with Os< ar B. Depue, manufacturer 
of motion picture printing machines 
and light control boards, in the de- 
velopment of both 16nini and 3.Sinin 
printers of various types. 

Mis film experience also includes 
the dire<'tion of more than 50 mo- 
lion pictures as well as the cutting 
and editing of more than 12.S vari- 
ous industrial and governmental 
training hims. During World War 
II he supervised a weekly labora- 
tory output of 600,t)0() feet of film 
for I . S. .Army and Navy 16mm 
and 3.Smm releas<- prints. In addi- 
tion, he supervi-s«'d the production 
of a weekly average of one and one- 
half reels of various training films. 

In his present capacity with 
Sarra, Inc.. Mr. I.ignell is in charge 
of all lalioratorv operations for 
.New York and Chicago Sarra cli- 
ents. Sarra 's special processing of 
television prints, termed "Vide-O- 
riginal." i» one of his most recent 
...I.tisl,,,,.,,!-. 




You thould own the McGraw-Hill book 

FILMS IN BUSINESS AND INDUSTRY 

by 

HENRY CLAY GIPSON 

President of 

FILMFAX PRODUCTIONS 

Pilmfai produces motion picture* <ind tlide- 
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■.«\ (with a production backqround of over 
2 SO titles) in color filmstrips for use in 
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FIIMFAX »«O0UCTIONS 10 €.i» *^'■i S». N.- Y».k 17 NY. 




Clients of RKO-PATHE arc those who demand hiKhcsi 
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RKO-PATHE quality starts with the script, li develops in 
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RKO-PATHE success in film-making is based on the simple 
principle that films must have high entertainment value. 
Whether it instructs or sclls-in half-an-hour or half-a-min- 
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If you, too, demand highest quality, get in couch with Bob 
Johnson, who will happily give you the full story of RKO- 
PATHE accomplishments. 



Address RolMn S. Johnio 

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( S.'^l niMORY OF A BUSINESS FILM 

Report to Stockholders 

(General Mills Contiiuies a Scries 
Sponsor: General Mills. 
Title: A Report to Stockholders, 8 min. rolnr. 

produced by Dudley Pictures Corporation. 
■¥ General Mills' most recent annual report film 
(1952), A Report to Stockholders, an eight- 
minute animated cartoon in color, was pro- 
duced bv Don McNamara of Dudley Television 
Corporation, Beverly Hills. California. It was 
shown at \?> stockholder meetings held by the 
company in late 1952 and is now available from 
the Film Department of General Mills at Min- 
neapolis on a free loan basis. The film empha- 




KlUM- I'.H. Sll \KK »/■ ih- ci)mii,ni\\ iliillar ^n,-^ In 
jarmers antl other malerial suppliers. 

sizes the importance of reinvesting earnings of 
a corporation and introduces "The General" of 
General Mills who takes the viewers on a tour 
of the company. 

The film opens with the little ""General"" pilot- 
ing the "General Mills Special"" train loaded with 
company products. These products are turned 
into sales doUars and the film then shows how 
these sales dollars were distributed. At the first 
signal along the train's route a bar drops down 
and shears the company's expenses for the 
year, depositing the money in the hands of the 
farmer and the other suppliers of raw materials. 

Later Lfncle Sam ivields a heavy ax to col- 
lect his cut. Then the truncated train finally st- 
rives at Stockholders Junction where Mr. and 

Federal Taxes lake another big cut out oj the 
company's annual earnings jor its owners. 



3825 BRYAN ST. 



DALLAS. TEXAS 




STOCK^OLO£RsJuNcr,ON 




Rei.nvESTED Finds are the "workinii ilnllurs" 
which build the comi>any's basic physical plant. 

Mrs. Stockholder and family are waiting to re- 
ceive the earnings. But they do not get all the 
money — the "General" takes part of it back with 
him to reinvest in the company. Mrs. Stock- 
holder then sends her husband to General Mills 
to find out what happened to the rest of the 
mone)'. whereupon the "General'" shows how 
these dollars, put back into the company, be- 
come working dollars. These working dollars 
have industriously built the work of General 
Mills over the vears. until today .Mr. Stock- 
holder's company is valued at 8108.000.000. 
This informational tour, of course, makes Mr. 
Stockholder very happy and the film ends with 
the "General,"' Stockholder and the General 
Mills employee marching forward together 
"toward a future unlimited."" ^ 

These Working Finds have helf>ed build Gen- 
eral Mills value to a total of $108,000,000. 




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BUSINESS SCREEN M ,\ (; A Z I N E 



SJUW IPIB©IDW(P^i 



Audio- Visual Equipment and Accessories for Business 



J. A. Maurer, Inc., Distributes 
Automatic Recording Camera 

♦ \lTO C\MF,RA M\RK :^ \> the 

nainc of a new reiording camera 
now being distributed by J. A. 
Malrer. Inc. The camera was orig- 
inally designed for aircraft use by 
D. Shackman & Sons Ltd. of London 
and is now finding application in 
scientific, engineering, and indus- 
trial visualization. 

Accessories are available to per- 
mit the cameras use for time-lapse 
recording, photomicrography, nor- 
mal and stereo photomacrography. 




The Auto Camera-Mark 3 

aircraft instrument recording, chem- 
ical experiment recording, traffic 
and highway condition recording, 
etc. Photography may be automat- 
ically accomplished to speeds as fast 
as 4 pictures per second or at in- 
tervals from 'i second to as long 
as desired. In this way any number 
of events may be recorded over rela- 
tively long periods of time. 

Automatic in operation, the cam- 
era has a special spring motor 
which provides, with one winding, 
the exposure of 21 feet of 3,Smm 
tilm held in special cassettes. Both 
the exposure and film transport 
functions are effected by a single 
electrical impulse. 

Operating voltage is pre-set at 
either 12 or 24 V DC. .iVn electrical 
contact is incorporated to provide 
for an external exposure indication 



or to flash an electronic-flash light 
source for illumination. Besides 
automatic electrical operation, the 
camera may also be controlled man- 
ually. 

Five shutter speeds for 1/10 sec- 
ond to 1 ''200 second and "time" 
exposure are provided. The stand- 
ard lens furnished is of 36mra focal 
length, f .3. .5 in a graduated focus- 
ing mount. This lens is also avail- 
able in a special anti-vibration fo- 
cusing mount designed prmarily for 
aircraft work. Many other lenses are 
available and special models of the 
camera incorporate 6" or 9" lenses. 

Two models of the Auto Camera 
Mark 3 are available: the Mark 
3-A, providing 200 pictures l"xl" 
and the Mark 3-B. 300 pictures in 
3/4"xl". A wide range of acces- 
sories is available to adapt the cam- 
era to specialized function including 
intervalometers. power supply units 
for operation on 110 \ 60 cvile AC. 
photomicrographic stands, focusing 
magnifiers, and many others. The 
camera measures 8~/s inches long. 
S'^g inches wide, and 4 inches high. 
It may be mounted from the front 
or base. 

Further information may be ob- 
tained from J. A. Maurer. Inc.. 
Photographic Instrumentation Di- 
vision. 37-01 — 31st Street. Long Is- 
land Citv 1. \. Y. 



New Company to Make Colortran 

♦ Colortran- lighting equipment 
which has been manufactured for 
several years by the Hunt & Piper 
Company under a license from L. 
V. Grover, owner of the patents on 
the equipment, will now be manu- 
factured by N.ATiRAL Lighting 
Corp., 1124 E. Colorado Blvd.. 
Glendale 5. Calif. Mr. L. V. Grover 
will be the head of the new com- 
pany. The company will also manu- 
facture Groverlites and other photo- 
graphic products. 



TRANSLUCENT SCREENS for REAR PROJECTION 

We Manufacture a Complete Line for 
All 16mm, Television & Display Use 



NEW: Black translucent screens 
available for immediate ship- 
ment in any standard size. 



NEW: White or blue translu- 
cent screens in any size, with 
or without frames. 



PIPER MANUFACTURING COMPANY 

3146-48 W. Lake St. • Chicago 12 • SAcramento 2-6534 



Serving, the Upper yilid'tlJeJt . 

EMPIRE 

PHOTOSOUND INC. 

MOTION PICTURES 

SLIDE FILMS 

TV COMMERCIALS 



Complete production (acilitiei 
3500 iq. [t. iound ita^ 



1920 LYNDALE AVE. SOUTH 
MINNEAPOLIS 5, MINNESOTA 



£ib rur^ 



of 



MOOD & BRIDGE MUSIC 



A diversified librury of mu•^i^al rerordingp providing in- 
otdental and mood music in various lengths and rliaractere 
-ranging from fanfares, openings, endings and romantic 
moods to weird and frolic melodies. Suitable for every 
type of production: T\ programs. Idmm films, theatrical 
/hous. newsreeJs. sound slidefilms, etc. High Fidelity re- 
rordinps performed by full-size orchestras. Available either 
on a ijer seleriinn or unlimited use basis. 

I.irrnse Conditions and 
hull Ih'tails on Rrtfuvsl. 



AyOIO-MASTER Corp. 



;i4l Mutliiion \%r. 
New York 17. N. Y. 



19 5 3 r R o 1) t i; r i o n k k \ 1 1: ^ 





• PRINTING 

• RECORDING 

• PROCESSING 



All 16mm Motion Picture and 35mm Slide 

& Filmstrip Services. Radio Transcriptions 

Tape Duplicating 



224 ABBOTT ROAD 

EAST LANSING, MICHIGAN 



ATTINTION: Film Buyers, Program Directors, 
Film Producers, Agency TV — — 

Depts. 



STO 



Everybody 



CK A 



HOTS 



aiol^- 



,\,e usual '»■"• ' Cl,o*S 



^Tww" . 1. u^ out lor 

hul don I ru"^ c^r any 



. special".- >" ■ Black and -"•"„, up.,„-dai- -■ 



62 Wes> 45th bue 



We Sell 
We Kent 
We Semee 



A complete line of 3Smm — 
16mm Mitchell, Bell & Howell, 
Maurer and Arriflex cameras 

TV GROUND GLASS . . . 

(or Mitchell Standard, N. C, Bell & Howell 
35mni cameros. Shows TV alignment. 
Outlines octive receiving area and 
Acodemy (sound) aperture. 



CAMERAS 

MOVIOLAS 

DOLLIES 



Griswold 

HOT SPLICERS! . . . $65. 

Your Griswold Splicer, Models R2 and R3, 
converted to hot splicer $40. 



Expert factory repairs. We mount lenses. 



FRANK C. ZUCKER 



(7Bni6Rfl€ouipni€nT(o. 



New A-V 
Products: 

(co,nt"u from p. 125 1 

• 
Here's llie Victor 
Magnesound Recording 
Attachment Sh/jwn in 
Use with the Victor 
16mm Sovereign 
Projector. 



Magnesound Tape Attachment to 
Convert Victor 16mm Projectors 

♦ The application of magnetic re- 
cording and playback to existing 
Victor 16nini sound projectors is 
being received with interest by pro- 
jector owners according to Victor 
Animatograph Corporation of 
Davenport. Iowa. Use of the mag- 
netic sound fibiis with Victor 16nim 
optical sound projectors is made 
possible with Victor's new Magne- 
sound — a recording and playback 
attachment. 

The first commercial 16mm mag- 
netic sound attachment on the mar- 
) ket. the Magnesound, is priced at 
$199.45 complete with microphone 
and carrying case. It records and 
reproduces both voice and music on 
16mm magnetic striped films. The 
sound can be recorded, erased and 
re-recorded as desired. 

Here Are Major Components 
Major components of the Magne- 
sound include a magnetic drum in- 
corporating separate record-play- 
back and erase heads and a separ- 
ate magnetic amplifier in a com- 
pact, lightweight case. The Magne- 
sound drum is interchangeable 
with the projector's optical sound 
drum and is connected to the mag- 
netic amplifier. The Magnesound 
amplifier is. in turn, interconnected 
with the projector amplifier. 

In use. magnetic sound film is 
placed in the projector over the us- 
ual threading route, and the projec- 
tor is operated in the conventional 
manner. Recording and playback 
are accomplished as the film runs 
through the projector. 

Renr-N at Either 16 or 24 
Recordings can be made at either 
16 or 24 frames per second with 
the Magnesound. Erasure of a pre- 
vious recording is automatic when 
a new recording is placed on the 
film. A special safety device incor- 
porated in the record-play switch 
on the Magnesound amplifier elimi- 
nates possibility of accidental era- 
sure of a recording. 




Producers Use Eclair Cameretle 
for Current Stereo Production 

♦ The C\mkrf:ttf.. manufactured 
by Eclair. Paris, is being used for 
Stereo motion picture photography 
by several producers. One of the 
main reasons for its popularity for 
Stereo photography is its light 
weight. A single Camerette, with 
three lenses and loaded magazine 
weighs only fifteen pounds. The 
combined weight of two camerettes 
in a stereo mount is only sixty-five 
pounds. Consequently, it is ideal, 
either singly or in stereo pairs, for 
location shooting. 

The Camerette has a number of 
interesting features, among the most 
unusual of which is the convertibil- 
ity of the 16/35 model which con- 
verts from 16nim film to 35mm film 
or vice versa in just a few seconds. 

Among the companies now using 
the Camerette are Encyclopaedia Bri- 
tannica Films, who find the 16'35 
Camerette most useful for location 
shooting and 20th Century Fox 
which shot much of the under water 
work for The Frog Men with the 
underwater version of the Camer- 
ette. Louis DeRochemont, Sarra. 
Affiliated Film Producers, and 
MPO are all using Camerettes for 
current assignments. 



National Cine Equipment Offers 
New Three Wheel Collapsible Dolly 

♦ A three wheel dollv which folds 
into one compact lightweight unit is 
now being distributed by National 
Cine Eqiipment. Inc. Size of the 
"triangular" dollv when collapsed is 
20"x20"x36". 

Made of cast aluminum construc- 
tion, the dolly folds into one unit se- 



SPECIAL OPTICAL EFFECTS 
AND TITLES 



RAY MERCER & COMPANY 

4241 Normal Ave. • Hollywood 24. Calif. 

Semi jnr Free Optical Effect! Chan 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



cured by screws on a center mount 
casting, which also provides a hook 
for optional use of the tie down 
chains «hen using standard or baby 
tripods. 

Extra wide rubber wheels are 
used til prevent side sway. Bronze 
tie down clamps for all types of 
standard and television tripod legs 
are used to hold the tripod rigid. An 
adjustable spring mounted seat for 
the operator is provided. 

Floor hand jack screws are used 
for leveling or stationary position. A 
removable steering handle with fork 
and a quick lock for "'in line" steer- 
ing is provided. 

Further information may be ob- 
tained from National Cine Equip- 
ment. Inc.. 209 West 48th St., New 
York 36. 



lUll 







01,1 lump (topi n,.„ lamp (helow) 

Westinghouse Projection Lamp 
Provides Better Screen Brilliance 

* A new 16mm projection lamp 
said to produce up to 20 percent 
more screenlight was introduced in 
500 and 750 watt sizes bv the 
Westinghouse Lamp Dmsio-V in 
late January. The improved bulb 
was developed with the assistance 
of Bell & Howell Company en- 



gineers. 

The increased 



hciency stems 



tiiu hUO":"'^ 



V4cyyiii*H 



Buii 



Fill 



mi, tibraries. Advertising Com 
I Diilribulors, ere, Vocuumak 
oReri quick relief lor film head 



pom 

Corporal 

aches. 

BY TAKING OVER COMPLETE 
FILM HANDLING PROBLEMS 

• FILM PROCESSING 
• CLEANING 
• REPAIRING 
• SHIPPING 
• STORAGE 
All bookings promptly 
filled. 






••II. WriK 
NOW. 



from tighter winding and closer 
spacing of the filament coils made 
possible by a patented feature, the 
"Floating Bridge." Willett Wil- 
son, photographic lamp manager in 
the Division's commercial depart- 
ment, said the smaller filament al- 
lows the projector's optical device 
to pick up and deliver to the screen 
a record amount of illumination per 
watt. 

The quality of the filament wire 
has also been improved through 
metalurgical research according to 
William B. Gero, manager of com- 
mercial engineering. 

The "Floating Bridge"', which is 
the basis of the new lamp, is a sup- 
porting and guiding device which 
permits the filament sections to ride 
as a unit on vertical rods. When 
the tungsten coils expand when the 
bulb is turned on the rods control 
their movement. As the coils cool 
the new bridge allows them to slide 
back to their original design posi- 
tion. This floating action minimizes 
the forces which eventually cause 
reduced screen-light through fila- 
ment distortion. 

Application of the concentrated 
filament principle to the 1000-volt 
lamp is being studied as a possible 
future development. 



Par Products Announces New Frame 
Release Solenoid for Cine-Kodak 

♦ Par Products Corporation an- 
nounced its production of a new 
single frame release solenoid (115 
volts AC I which provides for push 
button operation of the single frame 
release permitting animation and 
other operations of single frame uti- 
lization. In addition, the solenoid 
eliminates camera unsteadiness 
which results from manual opera- 
tion of the release. 

It may be used with the Eastman 
Cine-Kodak .Special I and II. Addi- 
tional information on this product, 
as well as other motion picture spe- 
cialties, may be obtained from Par 
Products Corporation, 926 North 
Citrus Avenue, Hollywood. 



iajMMa»«j.iijin.m'i»L»^^nrg 




AT YOUR SERVICE >^CT/CL 





TV FILMS 

MOTION PICTURES 

SLIDE FILMS 



INDUSTRIAL 

COMMERCIAL 

PUBLIC RELATIONS 

SALES & TRAINING 



STUDIO & OFFICES 
1515 EUCLID AVENUE 
CLEVELAND 15, OHIO 



THE ONLY 

GUARANTEED 

SCRATCH 

REMOVAL 

PROCESS! 

RAPID FILM TECHMOIIF INC. 



Who 



RAPIDWELO Does 




l.Wosh. 2. Remove Scratches ond 
Abrosions. 3. Coot emulsion with 
RAPIDTREAT Scrotch Resister. 4. 
Repair all bad splices. 5. Rewind 

The pioneers in scrotch removal lor 
motion picture film. 16mm, 35mm, 
Originals, Kodochrome, negatives 
and prints. For full inlormotion 
write for Booklet BS. 

21 West 46th St., N. Y. 36, N. Y. 



35mm 
Model 11 



A TRULY GREAT 
CAMERA for TV. 

Newsreel and 
commercial films 



For tough and trying assignments, ARRIFLEX 35 is 
in a class by itself. Reflex focusing through photo- 
graphing lens while camera is operating — this is 
just one outstanding ARRIFLEX feature. 




Equipped with bright, right-side-up image finder, 
ty, X magniricatlon. Solves all porollox problems. 
3 lens turret. Variable speed motor built Into 
handle operotes from lightweight battery. Tachom- 
eter registering from to 50 frames per second. 
Cempoct,' lightweight for either tripod or hand-held 
nimlng. Talies 200' or 400' magoiine. 



SflmcRfl €ouipmenT (^. 
1600 snodOuiM \ n<ui lOdn ciii ^-- 



Write for free folder. 



19. i 3 PRODLCTION RKVIEW 



127 



A NATIONAL DIRECTORY OF VISUAL EDUCATION DEALERS 



EASTERN STATES 

• CONNECTICUT • 

Rockwell Film & Projection 
Service, 182 High St.. Hartford 5. 



• DISTMCT OF COLUMBIA • 

Jam Handy Organization, Inc., 

1730 H Street, Washington 6, 
The Film Center, 915 12th St. 
N.W., Washington. 

• MARYLAND • 

Howard E. Thompson, Box 204, 
Mt. Airy. 

• MASSACHUSETTS • 

Cinema, Inc., 234 Clarendon St., 
Boston 16. 

• NEW HAMPSHIRE • 

A. H. Rice Co., Inc., 78 West Cen- 
tral Street, Manchester. 

• NEW JERSEY • 

Slidecraft Co., 142 Morris Ave., 
Mountain Lakes, N. J. 

• NEW YORK • 

Association Films, Inc., 35 West 

45th Street, New York 19. 

Buchan Pictures, 79 Allen St., 
Buffalo. 

Charles J. Ciegerich, 42-20 Kis- 
sena Blvd., Flushing. 

Comprehensive Service Co., 245 

W. 55th St., New York 19. 

Crawford & Immig, Inc., 265 W. 

14th St., New York City 11. 

The Jam Handy Organization, 
Inc., 1775 Broadway, New York. 

Ken KiUian Sd. & Vis. Pdts. 
P. 0. Box 364 Hempstead, N. Y. 

Mognll, Film and Camera Com- 
pany, 112-114 W. 48th St., New 
York 19. 

S. O. S. Cinema Supply Corp., 

602 W. 52nd St., New York 19. 

Specialized Sound Products Co., 

551 Fifth Ave., New York 17. 
United Specialists, Inc., Pawling. 
Visual Sciences, 599BS Suffern. 

• PENNSYLVANIA • 
Jam Handy Organization, Inc., 

930 Penn Ave., Pittsburgh 22. 
J. P. LiUey & Son, 277 Boas St., 
Harrisburg. 

Lippincott Pictures, Inc., 4729 
Ludlow St., Philadelphia 39. 



• RHODE ISLAND • 

Westcott, Slade & Balcom Co., 

95-99 Empire St., Providence 3. 



• WEST VIRGINIA • 

Haley Audio-Visual Service, 

Box 703, Charleston 23. 
Pavis, Inc., 427 W. Washington St., 

Phone 2-5311, Box 6095, Station 

A, Charleston 2. 
B. S. Simpson, 818 Virginia St., 

W., Charleston 2. 



SOUTHERN STATES 

• ALABA3fA • 

Stevens Pictures, Inc., 217 - 22nd 



• ARKANSAS • 

Grimm-Williams Co., 115 W. 

Sixth Street, Little Rock. 



• WISCONSIN • 
R. H. Flath Company, 2410 N. 3d 
St.. Milwaukee 12. 



St., North, Birmingham. 



• FLORIDA • 



Norman Laboratories & Studio, 

Arlington Suburb, Jacksonville. 



• GEORGIA • 

Colonial Films, 1118 W. Peachtree 
Sl, N.W., ATwood 7588, Atlanta. 

Stevens Pictures, Inc., 101 Walton 

St., N. W., Atlanta 3. 



• LOUISIANA • 
Stanley Projection Company, 

211^4 Murray St., Alexandria. 
Stevens Pictures, Inc., 1307 Tu- 

lane Ave., New Orleans. 
Stirling Visual Education Co., 

1052 Florida St., Baton Rouge. 

Delta Visual Service, Inc., 815 

Poydras St., New Orleans 13. 



• mssissippi • 

Herschel Smith Company, 119 

Roach St., Jackson 110. 
Jasper Ewing & Sons, 227 S. State 
St., Jackson 2. 



• TENNESSEE • 
Southern Visual Films, 687 

Shrine Bldg., Memphis. 

Tennessee Visual Education 

Service, 416 A. Broad St., Nash- 
ville. 



• VIRGINIA • 

Tidewater Audio- Visual Center, 

617 W. 35th St., Norfolk 8, Phone 
51371. 



MIDWESTERN STATES WESTERN STATES 



• ILLINOIS • 

.\merican Film Registry, 24 E. 

Eighth Street, Chicago 5. 

Association Films, Inc., 79 E^st 
Adams St., Chicago 3. 

Atlas Film Corporation, 1111 
South Boulevard, Oak Park. 

Jam Handy Organization, Inc., 

230 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago 1. 

Midwest Visual Equipment Co., 

3518 Devon Ave., Chicago 45. 
Swank Motion Pictures, 614 N. 

Skinker Blvd., St. Louis 5, Mo. 

• INDLiNA • 

Burke's Motion Picture Co., 434 

Lincoln Way West, South Bend 5. 

• IOWA • 

Pratt Sound Films, Inc., 720 3rd 

Ave., S.E., Cedar Rapids, Iowa. 

• KANSAS-MISSOURI • 

Erker Bros. Optical Co., 610 

Olive St., St. Louis 1. 
Swank Motion Pictures, 614 N. 
Skinker Blvd., St. Louis 5. 



• MICHIGAN • 
Engleman Visual Education 

Service, 4754-56 Woodward Ave., 
Detroit 1. 

Jam Handy Organization, Inc., 

2821 E. Grand Blvd., Detroit 11. 

Capital Film Service, 224 Abbott 
Road, East Lansing, Michigan. 



• OHIO • 
Ralph V. HaUe & Associates, 

215 Walnut St., Cincinnati. 
Academy Film Service Inc., 2112 

Payne Ave., Cleveland 14. 
Fryan Film Service, 1310 E. 12th 

St., Cleveland 14. 
Sunray Films, Inc., 2108 Payne 

Ave., Cleveland 14. 
Jam Handy Organization, Inc., 

310 Talbott Building, Dayton 2. 

Twyman Films Inc., 400 West 
First Street, Dayton. 

M. H. Martin Company, 1118 
Lincoln Way E., Massillon. 



• CALIFORNIA • 

James Baron, P.O. Box 291, 
Phcjne Mu. .53.31. Los Angeles. 

Donald J. Clausonthue, 1829 N. 
Craig Ave., Altadena. 

Coast Visual Education Co., 5620 
Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood 28. 

Hollywood Camera Exchange, 
1600 N. Cahuenga Blvd., HoUy- 
wood 28. 

Jam Handy Organization, Inc., 
7046 Hollywood Blvd., Los An- 
geles 28. 

Ralke Company, 829 S. Flower St., 
Los Angeles 17. 

Spindler & Sauppe, 2201 Beverly 
Blvd., Los Angeles 4. 

Association Films, Inc., 351 Turk 
St., San Francisco 2. 

C. R. Skinner Manufacturing 
Co., 239 Grant .'\ve., San Fran- 
cisco 8. 

Westcoast Films, 350 Battery St., 
San Francisco 11. 

• COLORADO • 

Dale Deane's Home Movie Sales 
Agency, 28 E. Ninth Ave., Den- 



ver 3. 

• OKLAHOMA • 

H. O. Davis, 522 N. Broadway, 
Oklahoma City 2. 

• OREGON • 
Moore's Motion Picture Service. 

33 N. W. 9th Ave., Portland 
9, Oregon. 

• TEXAS • 

Association Films, Inc., 1915 Live 

Oak St.. Dallas 1. 
George H. Mitchell Co., 712 N. 

Haskell, Dallas 1. 
Capitol Photo Supplies, 2428 

Guadalupe St., Phone 8-5717, 
.\ustin. 

• UTAH • 
Deseret Book Company, 44 E. So. 

Temple St., Salt Lake City 10. 



CANADA - FOREIGN 

.-Vudio-Visual Supply Company, 

Toronto General Trusts Building, 
Winnipeg, Man. 
Distribuidora Filmica Venezo- 
lana De 16MM.. S.A.. Apartado 
706 Caracas. Venezuela, S.A. 



USE THIS DIRECTORY TO LOCATE THE BEST IN EQUIPMENT, FILMS AND PROJECTION SERVICE 



BUSINESS SCREEN M.\GAZINE 



TECHNICOLOR 

AGAIN IS EXPANDING ITS 

CAPACITY TO MEET THE 

EVER-INCREASING DEMANDS 

FOR 




TECHNICOLOR 



IS THE TRADE MARK OF 



TECHNICOLOR MOTION PICTURE CORPORATION 

HERBERT T. KALMUS, PRESIDENT AND GENERAL MANAGER 



I 




^^. 




"Wfngii tot Roper Windsock" p 
vitid picture of the iniportanre of aviation aniJ 
its influence on the peoples iif (he world. 
In a world of aero-fantasy, it is packed with 
plenlj' of real action. 

With an impact born of long profeasionai 

experience baaed on an underslanding of all the 

needs, this new sound motion picture, 

produced for the l'. S. Air Force, 

"»ock»" home it^ powerful message. 

So do other "pictures to a purpose" produced by 




ffinffs for Roger Windsock 



7^ 
lAM HANDY 




Visnalicatioai • P r e • e ■ t • t i o n« • Live Show* • Motion Picture* • Slidefilms • Training Assistanci 
Wew T««k !♦ WitfciaglM 4, D.C Piu.k«|li Jl DMrail 11 Borton 2 Chiai* 1 Loi Angelei M 

J775 Brai^way IT39 H S«r«w«, N.1P. 9S(W3I P«Ba A»«. Mil E. Gnad BM. 310 T.lboU Bldn. 230 North HicbiMn A»*. 7046 HaUywMd 



3U5IN 
SCREE 





Ht; 



API^<T?53 





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Feature Report — 

AUDIENCES: U.S.A. 

DISTRIBUTION METHODS & RESULTS 
NUMBER 2 • VOLUME 14 • 1953 






50c COPY 



SERVICE 





to serve 



SERVICE is the basis of Atlas Filmaturity. By rendering consistently efficient service, 

Service is much more than the mere will to Atlas has thrived through forty consecutive 

serve— a proper impulse in the right direc- years and has become the oldest producer of 

tion. The u'ill to serve must be coupled with business films in America. 

the ability to serve— the talent, equipment Take advantage of the wealth of Atlas 

and facilities. Fil maturity that is always at \our service. 



FILMATURITY 







CONSULTATION WITHOUT OBLIGATION 

ATLAS FILM CORPORATION 

Producers of Ouo/i/y Molior, Pictures, Sound SlldefUms, Theatrical Shorts, TV CommerciaU 

ESTABLISHED 1913 

1111 SOUTH BOULEVARD • OAK PARK, ILLINOIS • CHICAGO PHONE: AUSTIN 7-8620 

^ (he wealth of mature film sense, skill and iudgement achieved only through many years of actual produci 



BURLU 



THE MEASURE of a ^oo(l film is its power to get action 
— the KIND of aetion most desired b\ the sponsor. 
Hundreds of Caravel productions— for widely differ- 
ent purposes — have met this test successfully, ^e in- 
vite you to view any of these films and judge their im- 
pa<'t hy the impact they have on YOU. For exam|)le . . . 






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AGAii\. WE IINMTE vou to view these produc- 
■f^ tions— either at your offices or ours. Or— 
if vou have films of a different type in mind, 
let us select a show ing more in line with your 
specifio needs. Write or telephone toihiy. 



CARAVEL m FILMS, INC. 



7 3 FIFTH A \ K N I K 



iN i: W 1 O R K 



T K I. 



(. I R C L E 



6 110 



BYRON MOTION PICTURES 
BYRON MOTION PICTURES 
BYRON MO^"^N PICTURES 
BYRON Mf ■■•SS 



BYRON MOTION 
BYRON MOTION 
BYRON MOTION 
BYRON MOTION 
'''OON MOTION 
/V.-^'iON 






H ;'^'>, 









_'KILLED, EXPERIENCED 
TECHNICIANS AND MODERN 
EQUIPMENT GUARANTEE 
PROFESSIONAL QUALITY... 
FAST SERVICE ... LOW PRICES 






Bt^ 

BYRON Mo... 

BYRON MOTION Pic.^ 

BYRON MOTION PICTURES 

BYRON MOTION PICTURES 

BYRON MOTION PICTURES 

BYRON MOTinM DirTNRBC 



"ei- 1 ION 

* /ION 

/TION 

DTION 

OTION 

AOTION 

b . . MOTION 

BYRON MOTION 

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Soiiietiiiies even 
these woirt do • • • 

Many machine operations in a modern industrial plant are so 
rapid even the eye can't follow. Time and motion studies by usual 
methods often fall short of the needed exactness. 

Because accurate analyses can mean the difference between 
profit and loss, many plant engineers now depend on movies taken 
with Bell & Howell precision equipment. 

The experience of the Ramsey Corporation is only one of 
many. The extraordinary precision with which Bell & Howell 
cameras, projectors and accessories are built make them ideal for 
all industrial needs. 



Basic for industrial use... 

The 16mm 70-TM. shown here, is built both 
for heavy-duty and precision work. 7 accu- 
rate film speeds especially for time study ^ 
500. 750. 1000, 1500, 2000, 3000 and 4000 
frames per minute. Accurate spring drive. 
Adapted to take electric motor. The wide 
variety of accessories for this camera make 
it ideal for any industrial purpose. Special 
projectors for time study use also available. 

You buy for life when you buy 



&?^~^ '' 




Belle Howell 



How Ramsey Corporation solved 
vexing time study problem . . . 




Ramsey Corporation of St. Louis, makers of auto- 
motive piston rings and expanders, needed depend- 
able analyses of certain machine operations as a 
basis for piece rates. Usual observational methods 
produced unsatisfactory results. 




With the cooperation of Bell & Howell engineers, 
time studies were then made on film using Bell & 
Howell equipment. The result was the establishment 
of piece rates satisfactory to all concerned. The 
visual analyses also led to a number of improve- 
ments in operational methods. Shown is William A. 
Vogler of Ramsey Corporation exhibiting time study 
film to group of employees. 



BOOKLET SHOWS HOW MOVIES AID 
IN TIME-MOTION STUDIES 



Bell 8, Hov> 
7108 McCo 



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load, Chicago 45, III. 



Gentlemen: 

Please send me your free booklet 

"Measure Time Accurately." 




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switch the TSI Projector is on and running. 

Automatic Rewind— Due to exclusive 16mm film 
magazine — film is outomoticolly rewound — no re- 
threoding necessary — magazine is power driven. 
It's reody to go after every show. 



Daylight Operatioi 

draperies. Crystol 



d to draw shades < 
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Compact — Model D or H [DeVry 
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Write today for illustrated brochures feoturin 
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Technical 
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Incorporated 

— Dept. C-3— 
30865 Five Mile Road 

LIVONIA, MICHIGAN, U. S. A. 



al t'<;i<i';>men( 




G A Z I N E 



Issue 2 • Volume 14 

PREVIEW OF CONTENTS 

Trends in the \e»s of Business Films 10 

French Industry on the Screen, by Tom Hope 24 

The Birth of a Fihn: from Idea to Screen 40 

Case Histories of New Business Pictures 42 

"Northwest Empire" Film Saga by Vincent Hunter 44 

Progress in Stereoscopic Motion Pictures 46 

A Special Report by Edwin H. Land. Polaroid Corporation 

Pre-Testing to Insure Film Success by Charles Bigelow 48 

Armour Trailers UP Drive-In Sales 56 

Cannon Electric Company Previews "Contact" 64 

Tape Tells the Story at Pacific Electric Railway 62 

Report on Distribltion: Feature 

Audiences U. S A.: Present and Potential 33 

Major Areas for External Distribution 34 

What Have We Learned About Sponsored Films? _ 37 

Business Screen Survey of Film Distribution 38 

Business Screen Editorial Departments 

Executive Appointments in the Industry 14 

People Who Make Pictures: News of Personnel 54 

What's New in Business Pictures: Film Notes 58 

The Commercial Newsreel: New Sponsored Films 60 

New Audio-Visual Equipment and Accessories 66 

The Offscreen Voice: A Column of Editorial Comment 72 

Plus: The National Directokv of Visual Education Dealer? 




Office of Publication: 7064 Sheridan Road. Cliicafio 26 

O. H Coelln. Jr.. Editor Everett Davis. Art Director 

Ki-nrictli Duncan. I'roiluclion Mildred Jordan. Circulation 

Jane Ware. Eililorial Secretary 

Eastern Editorial Bureau Western Editorial Bureau 

Robert Se>niour. Jr.. Eastern Manager Edmund Kerr, Western Manager 



489 Fifth Avenue. New York Citv 
Riverside 9-0215 or .MUrrav Hill 2-2492 



3()3iS BeverK BouIe\ard. Los Angeles 4 
Telephone: Dl'nkirk 8-0613 



isue Two. Volume Fourteen of Business Screen iVlaKazinc, published March 30, 195.1. Issued 8 times .-uinually at six-week 
itcrvals at 7064 Sheridan Road. Chicago 26. lUinois by Business Screen Magazines, Inc. Phone BRiargatc 4-823-t. O. H. Codln. 
■., Editor and Publisher. In New York: Robert Seymour, Jr., 489 Fifth Avenue. Telephone Riverside 90215 or MUrray Hill 
2492. In Los Angeles; Edmund Kerr, i03S Beverly Blvd. Telephone DUnkirk 806U. Subscriptions $.1.00 a year: S5.00 two 
zars (domestic) : S4.0<) and S'.OO foreign. Entered .is second class matter May 2, 1946. at the post ofHce at Chicago. Ilhnois. 
Oder Act of .March ,!. I.>i;9. Entire contents Copyright 1952 by Business Screen M.igazines. Inc. Trademark registered V".S. 
atent Office. .Address advertising and subscription inquiries to the Cliicaeo office of publication. 



BUSINESS SCREEN .M .4 G .\ Z I N E 



w. 



ILDIING WRITES and proiliu-es a motion picturf to s«'II 
a product or a serviff. an<l it j;o«"s into the field. Months, 
sometimes years, later we hear al)out its continuing success. 
One of our productions.* released in 16nim. has been shown 
to small groups the «'ountry over since February of 1949. 
In February of 19.^3 we received what the Mriter called a 
letter of gratitu«le: 

The picture has hceii one of the factors that have forced 
us to expand our facilities repeatedly. Its impact on the 
market has been such that ue are doubling our capacity 
to meet the demand. From an average operation, ue have 
f!r<nvn to the city's largest. 

Ill our files are many similar success stories of Wilding films 
that stimulated sales. 



*A screening of this picture ran be arranged by calling any of the Wilding offices listed on this 
page. 



*CHICAGO 

1345 Argyle Street 

NEW YORK 

385 Madison Ave. 



^DETROIT 

1000 Dime Bldg. 



CLEVELAND 

1010 Euclid Bldg. 



^HOLLYWOOD 

5981 Venice Blvd. 



ST. LOUIS 

4378 Lindell Blvd. 



CINCINNATI 

Enquirer Bldg. 



PITTSBURGH 

Law & Finance Bldg. 
'Studio Facilities 



WILDING 

PICTURE PRODUCTIONS, INC. 

MOTION IMdl'RliS . SI 11)1 I II MS . II II \ ISI()\ I II \ls 




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barrier of heated air, which stubbornly surrounds 
the lamp, and forces a constant flow of fresh cool 
air directly against the lamp itself. 

But that's scientific talk! What it reoHy means to 
the user is a projector that is delightfully eool-to- 
the-touch- even after long periods of sfe " 
and vastly lengthens lamp life too! 

Specifically designed ana engineered for 500 won 



illumination which actually exceeds the illumina- 
tion delivered by ordinary projectors with 750 watt 
lamps! The exclusive LIGHT-MULTIPLIER optical 
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BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 




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H. H. SEAY JR., 
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Inc.. Columbus, Ohio 



PRODUCTS manufactured by Bell Sound Systems. Inc., 
are too heavy and bulky to carry, and catalogs do not 
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H. H. Seay Jr., however, has found Stereo-REALIST indis- 
pensable in his sales contacts. He uses the RtALlST both to 
photograph his complete line in full, natural color and 
three dimensions, and to take pictures of his distributors. 

RiALlsT pictures arc the next best thing to displaymg 
the actual product itself, because this precision-built 
camera duplicates exactly what you sec with your eyes. 

Why not consider using the Rkalist as a visual sales 
aid in your business? Chances are it will do the job better 
at loutr coil than you now believe possible. It you 
haven't seen Realist pictures, ask your camera dealer or 
commercial photographer to show you some. Or for tree 
folder on its business applications write: David White 
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buttons. Surface is powdered aluminum bonded firmly for maximum 
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Safety Film Awards 

.National Committee on Films 
for Safety ^lames *52 Winners 

'T'liK OLTSTA.NDIXC safety motion 
•*■ pictures and slidefilms of 1952, 
as stiecled by the National Com- 
niiltce on Films for Safety from 
i'Mioiig 6<) motion pictures and 
sound slidefilms accepted for screen- 
ing were announced in late March, 
just in time for the final forms of 
this issue. 

Nine sound motion pictures re- 
ceived top award plaques in the 
various categories judged by the 
committee. Just one sound slidefilm 
received the top award this year. 25 
Awards of Merit were extended to 
19 motion pictures and six sound 
slidefilms. Here are 1952's best 
safety -motion pictures in the opinion 
of this blue-ribbon jury of out- 
standing leaders in the field of safety 
education: 

Plaques to These Films 
Top award plaques in the "Gen- 
eral ' safet) group went to A'oi Too 
Hot to Handle, a fire safety motion 
picture produced by The Jam Handy 
Organization for Walter Kidde 
Company. On Post Safety, an .\rmy 
film produced by the Signal Corps. 
was another plaque winner; The 
Schvol Safety Committee, sponsored 
by the .Auto. Club of So. Calif, and 
produced by Sid Davis, won a 
plaque, as did Hands Off. sponsored 
by the Blue Cross and Blue Shield 
and produced by Iowa State Col- 
lege. 

Two top-award plaques were 
awarded Vogue-Wright Studios for 
Dark Daze, sponsored by the Na- 
tional -Association of .Automotive 
Mutual Cos.. and for Word of 
Honor, sponsored bv Kaiser-Frazer 
Sales Corporation. The other plaque 
winner in the Traffic & Transporta- 
tion motion picture group was 
Mickey's Big Chance, produced by 
F. K. Rockett Company for the AAA 
Foundation for Traffic Safety. 

In the field of Occupational 
Safety. You Can Take It Kith You. 
produced by Dallas Jones Produc- 
tions for the National Safety Coun- 
cil was one of two top-award selec- 
tions. Safe Every Second, produced 
by Gene K. Walker Productions for 
Standard Stations. Inc. was the 
other motion picture |]|aque winner 
in this group. 

One "Top" Sound Slidefilm 

I he only top award plaque given 
a sound slidefilm this year went to 
Sarra. Inc. for Pick Your Safely 



Target, a 13-minute subject spon- 
sored b\ the National Safety Coun- 
cil. 

Awards of Merit were shared by 
the U. S. Coast Guard, Jerry Fair- 
banks. Inc. (.3), Unifilm-s. Inc. (2 1, 
The Jam Handy Organization. Karig 
Motion Picture Company, Sarra, 
Inc., Atlantic Refining Co., Harold 
Kile S. Associates, Clark Eciuipnient 
Co.. Wilding Picture Productions. 
Paragon Pictures (2 1, the Pacific 
Telephone & Telegraph Co., Human 
Relations for Industry. Helio Pro- 
ductions. Aetna Casualty & Surety 
Co., A. Julian Brylawski. Coronet 
Films, .Michigan Inter- Industry 
Highway Safety Conmiittee. Lew 
Parry Film Productions, and Vogue 
Wright .Studios. Fairbanks' films 
were made for the National Board 
of Fire I nderwriters as was one of 
the subjects by Unifilms. 

The other Unifilm Award of Merit 
was shared by the Pennsylvania 
Railroad. National Electric Products 
Corp. shared the Jam Handy merit 
award: the Oregon & Washington 
Forest Fire .Assns.. Santa Fe Rail- 
way. Mine Safety Appliances Co. 
and Zurich-American Insurances 
Cos. were others who shared merit 
awards accorded their productions 
for 1952. Q- 

Chicago Film Council Has Program 
on "Film As a Tool in Business" 

♦ "The Film As a Tool in Busi- 
ness" was the title of the program 
at the March meeting of the Chi- 
cago Film Council. Miss Kay Pow- 
ers, education director of the Uni- 
ted Airlines, presented the film 
Operation of American .Airlines. 
Daily Safety Meeting was present- 
ed by Mr. J. T. Hawkinson, audio- 
visual director and producer, Illi- 
nois Central Railroad, film de- 
partment. 

Production on New A.T.&T. Film 
Goes on Location at Bell Labs 

♦ Studiii x-quences for the .AMERI- 
CAN TeLEI'HD.NE & Telecr.4j>h Co.m- 
PANy picture tentatively titled Vis- 
ible Speech have been completed by 
Audio Productions. Technical 
scenes are now being shot by Alex- 
;inder Gansell. producer-director, on 
location at the Bell Laboratories. 

The Technicolor picture shows 
engineers taking "sound samples" 
at a simulated broadcast of Don 
Voorhees and his Telephone Hour 
Orchestra, with concert violinist 
Zino Francescatti as guest star. Bell 
System engineers, with their "sam- 
ples," will show the film's future 
audiences somid in profile and 
depth, and some facts about the 
progress toward voice-dialing. 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 





Cannon Plugs are vital links in the 
electrical life lines so essential to airplanes, 
television cameras, guided missiles and 
countless other modern mechanisms. "Contact'.' 
a new Wolff color film is also an 
important link ... in transmitting pertinent 
information concerning these plugs from Cannon 
Electric Co. to its many customers 
and pmspoctivc users throughout the world. 



STUDIOS ^^^ 



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MECHAMCAL MEMORY . . . 
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Each iniJi\idual film has its own 
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termines printing exposures, filler 
changes (for color) and effects,and 
stores up this knowledge for trans- 
fer to the printing machine itself. 
This Contrui ^trip permits exact 
duplication at any time. 



YOUR ASSURANCE OF 
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15 Years Research and Spe- 
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Our Advanced Methods and 

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Precision Film iMboratories — a di- 
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Newest Facilities in the 16mm 
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PRECISION 

FILM LABORATORIES, INC. 

21 West 46lh St.. 

New York 19, N.Y. 

JU 2-3970 




Oi :i-[) .\.M) COLUK TtLEVlSiON 



Three-Dime.nsion"s revival by our cousins 
in the entertainment industry has all the 
fervor and urgency of its spiritual coun- 
terpart. There is really nothing new about it, 
technically, as yet. but as Hollywood throws its 
technicians into the fray and the experts of this 
business film industry are enlisted to help main- 
tain the box-oflBces of the nation against the in- 
roads of television, something new may well 
come of it all. 

George Spoor's "Natural Vision" large screen 
presentation is emulated in the Twentieth Cen- 
tury Fox Cinemascope technique; the familiar 
Polaroid viewers with which New York World's 
Fair audiences saw Chrysler's .3-D movies by 
Loucks and Norling are being produced in mil- 
lion-fold lots for current consumption; Ra- 
phael G. Wolff is furnishing the equipment and 
his rare artistr\ for Sol Lesser's forthcoming 
.3-D shorts program. Ray Wolff has also dem- 
onstrated new industrial ideas in 3-D showings 
last month before Eastern industrialists. 

Freedom from the interlocked twin projec- 
tors, which would hamper any really wide- 
spread distribution of 3-D films via 16mm at 
present, may come via Polaroid's single-system 
Vectograph film, now^ in advanced experimental 
stages (see article in this issue). But meanwhile 
business is having lots of fun and plenty of 
sales attention from stereo slide presentations. 

The Congress fand in particular Senator 
Johnson of Colorado) has been reminding the 
television set makers that thev shouldn't delay 
the certainty of color television. In late March, 
RCA affirmed the readiness of its color equip- 
ment and the National Production Authority 
obligingly took the lid off color set manufac- 
ture. This industry's experienced producers of 
color films will be in a remarkable service po- 
sition. But sponsors who have not taken ad- 
vantage of the lull to stockpile color footage will 
be missing the chance of a lifetime. 

Witness the interest of television stations in 
such material for sustaining, free use as pro- 
gram filler. .Millions of additional attendance 
has been secured by astute sponsors whose 
films were sufficiently in the public interest to 
warrant these sustaining requests. Lessons can 
be learned in color production now that will 
save millions of dollars when the public has the 
sets; 16mm distribution as well as theatrical 
showings will pay for the films right now. 

This is the year of technical advance; but its 
also the year of destiny for present film spon- 
sors. Thats the text of our own report on dis- 
tribution trends which appears on following 
pages of this well-filled issue. 1^ 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



Which groove are yo" in? 






NEW 10" MICROGROOVE 

Slide Film Record 






OLD 16" STANDARD 

Slide Film Record 



No difference in playing time bul a vast expense. Find out how Microgroove pays 

difference in packing, shipping and mail- you back its conversion cost, then keeps 

ing costs! Savings up to 50'/i ! And you can on saving you money. Call Columbia or 

make the same terrific saving right up the send this coupon today — if you are still in 

line — on processing, pressing and storage ihe old groove! 



COLUMBIA 
TRANSCRIPTIONS 

A DIVISION OF COLUMBIA HKCOHD.S 

ORIGINATORS OF THE MICROGROOVE RECORD 



Trad* mark Columella' Bx] U S Pal 



Columbia Transcriptions 

799 Sevenlh Avenue, New York 19, New York 



We ate inleresled in the lull cosi and quality jtory ' 

on Microgroove Recordi. ' 

I 

Company— ^ \ 

Addieis- ■ ■ — I 

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VICTOR SOVEREIGN 
(Model 60-2S) 




DAVENPOnr, IOWA 

rort • Dhlribulort 



Recognized world-wide for 
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excellence of performance, 
precision construction and de- 
pendability, \'ictor 16mm 
projection equipment is the 
first choice of thousands in 
schools, businesses, churches, 
institutions and homes. 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZIiNE 



Your best foot is always f or\vard 
Avhen your 16inin color release prints are on 

ANSCO TYPE 238 FILM! 




Don't take anyone's word for the facts... make this comparison yourself 



Compare a print dii Ansco 1 ypc 2.'X 
with one on any otiier color dupliLa- 
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Once you make this comparison, 
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Ansco Color lype 238 Duplicating 
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protecting & carrying your 
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^ battery operated with push-button switch. Lightweight, hord- 

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V lEVw ER °"^ ''» " x *" stereo mounts. 

#1265 Viewer (less batteries) .List $9.95 



STEREO 
FILES 

STEREO 
BINDERS 



Completely portable all-steel file, holds 50 metal or glass 
binders 'or 125 cordboord mounts), in groups. Has scrolch- 
proof compartment that holds your Stereo Viewer. A hand- 
some, complete unit-in-one . . . designed especiolly for the 
salesmen who needs a compact, lightweight soles kit. 

#1111 File List $3.95 

Also, other convenient sizes. 



The only all-steel binders with gloss, that outomolicolly center 
and align your transparencies. No kits, jigs, tape or masks 
required. Accurate prongs hold film correct for viewing in 
stondord projectors or hand viewers. Simple snap assembly. 

#1166 Box of 24 sets List $4.50 

Pol. Pend. 




Kodak Advertising Executive 
Gets Annual Leadership Avirord 

♦ W. li. I'ciTTKK. .linilnr c.f adver- 
tising. Eastman Kodak Compa.ny. 
has received the first annual leader- 
ship award of radio station WH.\M. 
the Stromherg Carlson station in 
Rochester, N. Y. 

The award cited Poller's 20 years 
in public service and advertising 
fields and his "leading influence" 
in the Rochester Advertising Coun- 
cil and the Association of National 
Advertisers after which the Roches- 
ter group was patterned. 

The Kodak executive was a 
founder and first chairman of the 
board of the Rochester Council. He 
is at present a member of the board 
of ANA and served as its chairman 
in 1949-50. 

WHAM's citation attributed inuch 
of the Rochester Advertising Coun- 
cils success in promoting charitable 
and educational institutions and 
causes to Potter's "great enthusi- 
asm, his high sense of civic duty 
and his planning ability." 




W. Allen Taft 

DuPont Names Sales Executives 

♦ W. Alle.n Taft. who for the past 
year has been assistant district man- 
ager of the Chicago sales office of 
the Du Pont Compa.ny's Photo 
Products Department, has been ap- 
pointed an assislant director of sales 
of the department with headquarters 
in Wilmitiglon. 

Mr. Tafts appointment increases 
to three the top sales management 
of the Photo Products Department. 
K. T. MoLiN is director of sales, 
and A. Cr.\wford Hibb.\rd is an 
assistant director of sales. 

Under the new division of assign- 
ments, Mr. Hubbard will assist Mr. 
Molin in the sale of motion picture 
film and radiographic products, 
while Mr. Taft will be concerned 
with the sale of photographic films 
and sensitized paper to industry and 
the general photographic trade. 

Mr. Hubbard. 42. has been assist- 
ant director of sales in the depart- 



inriil >inii- 1944. Iia\ing started 
with the company 12 years earlier 
as a technical representative in the 
sale of x-ray film. In the interven- 
ing years he was a sales representa- 
tive in various district offices. He 
is a native of White Plains. N. Y., 
and a graduate of Amherst College. 




Alden 0. Carlson 

A. O. Carlson Becoines Head of 
Columbia Transcription Division 

♦ Effective last month. Alden 0. 
C-U5LS0N, former senior sales repre- 
sentative of the Transcription Divi- 
sion. Collmbia Records Inc., has 
been promoted to the post of gen- 
eral manager of that division, re- 
placing Robert Clarkson who has 
resigned. Mr. Carlson joined the 
organization in 1942 in a sales ca- 
pacitv and has remained with Co- 
lujiibia Transcriptions ever since. 

DuKane Appoints R. L. Shoemaker 
Audio-Visual Division Head 

♦ Robert L. Shoemaker has been 
appointed manager of the .\udio 
Visual Division of the DuK.\NE 
Corporation. St. Charles, Illinois, 
according to an announcement by 
J. McWilliams Stone, president. 
Formerly sales manager of this di- 
vision. Mr. Shoemaker will now be 
in charge of all division activities. 

Robert L. Shoe^hker 




BUSINESS SCREEN M.\GAZINE 



-.4 ^IIBauBljHaMBy jHfphi 



' a«b«a«BS«iii mm 







TEAMWORK 



Our organization operates like a ball team. There are 
definite positions that require the special skill and apti- 
tude of individual players. But not only must each 
player be outstanding in his own job, he must also have 
the experience and temperament that make it possible 
for him to co-ordinate with the other members of his 
team. 

Sound Masters has just that sort of well organized 
team, fiftv-two weeks a vear. 



Whether it be a slidefilm or a multiple reel saga of 
an industry; whether the shooting locations are in one 
place or spread out over the map, the Sound Masters 
team of "star players" is at your service. 

With special skills and highly developed production procedures, 
we will deliver to you, at the agreed time, a film that will accom- 
plish the special purpose for which it was intended. 




LET US MAKE YOUR NEXT PICTURE 
WE HAVE A LOT OF GOOD IDEAS 

SOUND MASTERS, INC. 




MOTION PICTURES 
SLIDE FILMS 
TV SHORTS 
COMMERCIALS 



ESTABLISHED 1937 165 WEST 46TH STREET, NEW YORK 36, N.Y. PHONE PLAZA 7-6600 





This informative folder, packed with pictures, shows how 
ideally qualified for schoolroom use the VU-LYTE is. It points 
out the easy availability of the free projection materials at every 
teacher's hand. It explains how applicable these free materials 
are, to every class level and subject. And it fully describes the 
exclusive features that make the Beseler VU-LYTE such an out- 
standing, ultra-modern, professional-type teaching tool, embody- 
ing an entirely new principle in opaque projection. 

This new folder, just off the press, illustrates and explains the 
Vacumatic* Platen, that holds copy flat without need for pasting 
and mounting ... the Feed-O-Matic* Conveyor, that feeds new 
^_^ copy in and ejects the old automatically . . . 

~ lU^i - 'he Poiniext Projection Pointer, the built-in opti- 

IP ^ cal device that throws on the screen a movable 
m .-»V/ arrow of light which the operator can direct and 

control without leaving his place beside the 
projector . . . and other features of pronounced 
teaching value. 

~i> *Par. Pending tPatented 



■OPENINGTHEDOORTOTHEt^llND.' 



CHARLES 

6 Badge 



(Ssde&A:^ 



COMPANY 



Wor/d'i 
Opoque 



r^ct* Monufocrurer 
gfecflsn Equ/pment 



Eastman Kodak Company Report 
Announces Sales Up 6% in 1952 

♦ (:..„s„ll,lal,-,l ,K-t sales of East- 
.M.*\ Kodak Cdmi'anv increased to 
a new high in 1952 for the third 
consecutive year. They were S575.- 
022.750. up six percent from the 
1951 level. Thomas J. IIakgrave. 
chairman, and .Albert K. Chai'- 
MAN. president, said in the com- 
pany's annual report, recently re- 
leased. 

Hargrave and Chapman said two 
factors were largely responsible for 
the high sales volume. One was an 
iniportant sales gain in photog- 
raphy, and the other was increased 
volume of government and defense 
business. 

Their further comment on the 
company's 1952 business was, "Our 
sales increase in 1952 came chiefly 
from the excellent demand for our 
photographic products. Sales of Ko- 
dak color films and prints continued 
to grow rapidly and produced a 
large part of the total increase in 
photographic sales. Most of our 
major lines of films, papers, chem- 
icals and accessories equaled or bet- 
tered their 1951 volume." 

They reported that professional 
motion picture films accounted for 
nine percent of the 1952 sales. The 
rest of the breakdown by product 
groups showed: amateur photog- 
raphy. 27% : commercial and pro- 
fessional photography. 25/c ; cellu- 
lose esters products. 16% : military 
apparatus and equipment, 14% : 
chemicals and chemical products, 
6% : and other products, 3%. 

The Kodak statement concluded 
with. "Our estimates at this time 
show that we may look for a some- 
what larger volume of sales in 195.3. 
Earning should be at a satisfactory 
level and. if sales are increased, 
should exceed those of 1952. It 
looks now as if 1953 will be a good 
\car for the company."' 

Air Reduction Sales Company Has 
Technical Films for Distribution 

♦ Hakvk'^ Punts of the .\iR Kk- 
DUCTION Sales Company has an- 
nounced the availability of two new- 
films. Burning Blades and Tool of 
Many Uses. The first is a half-hour 
picture on machine gas cutting 
aimed at the production manage- 
ment level, but considered suitable 
for showing to top groups in the 
metal fabrication field. 

Tool oj Many Uses tells the stor\ 
of the revolutionary aircomatic 
welding process in mass production 
welding work. It is of primary in- 
terest to people concerned with 
welding and allied metal fabrica- 
tion work. Both pictures may be 
obtained through Air Reduction 
Sales Company district offices. 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



ANOTHER PRODUCTION THAT DEMANDS THE 



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-yAT PERRiy. Producer 'Uv Friend Irmn" 



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115 Volt AC 60 Cycle, Synchronous Motor. 
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Animation Motors tor Cine Special, Mauiet. 
B & H, Mitchell Cameras, Motors tor Bolex and 
Filmo Cameras, and Time Lapse Equipment. 

• LENS COATING 

• "T" STOP CALIBRATION 

• DESIGNING and MANUFACTURING 

of lens mountings and camera equipment 
for 16mm and 35mm cameras. 

• BAUSCH & LOMB "BALTAR" 

LENSES f^rid others for Motion Pictiue and 
TV Cameras. 

• RENTALS — SALES — REPAIRS: 

Mitchell, Eyemo, Bell & Howell, Wall, 
Cine Special Cameras. 

Write for full /nfermotion and prices 




JOHN CLEMENS 



ERWIN HARWOOD 



NATIONAL CINE EQUIPMENT, Inc. 

209 WEST 48th STREET. NEW YORK 36. N. Y. 



Standard Offers Vocation Ideas 
In New Public Service Picture 

* In Ilic li-c ,,f xaiatioii-liriH-. 
19.5:5. the .Nanilaiil Oil Coiiipain of 
Indiana has just roleasfd a public 
service film that is full of travel 
ideas. Miilwest Holii/nv has a lif;ht 
comedy-romance jilnt. and a set- 
ting that covers 15 midwestern 
states. Wilding I^icture Produc- 
tions. Inc. was the producer. 

Charlie Flynn is cast as a vaca- 
tioning Paris reporter, and Ka\ 
Marlin plays an artist whose first 
love is painting the Midwest's beau- 
tiful scener>. They are supported 
by a cast of landmarks made fa- 
mous by people — both real and im- 
aginary — and the scenic Midwest. 

Vacation spots which the picture 
explores include the Indiana dune 
country. Lincoln land, the Grand 
Tetons. Yellowstone, the Black 
Hills and Mount Rushmore. Min- 
nesota's land of 10.000 lakes. Wis- 
consin Dells, the Iowa State Fair, 
and the Mississippi at Hannibal. 
Missouri. 

Throughout Midwests Holiday's 
scenes and situations run mem- 
ories of things past, of people and 
places seen. The picture recalls 
prairie schooners on the wheat- 
lands, your first ferris wheel ride, 
and the time you read about Tom 
Sawyer getting his fence white- 
washed — but it remains interesting 
and modern. 

Special black and white prints of 
the sound-color picture were pre- 
pared for television. Modern Talk- 
ing Picture Service will handle dis- 
Iribution of Midwest Holiday 
ill rough its nationwide network of 
ri gional film exchanges. 



16mm Film on Overhead Projector 
Produced by State U. of Iowa 

* A new IGnnn sound motion pic- 
ture showing the fundamental pur- 
poses and many uses of the 10 bv 
10 inch overhead projectors as well 
as methods of producing transpar- 
encies for this equipment has been 
produced by the Bureau of Audio- 
Visual Instruction. Extension Divi- 
sion. State University of Iowa. 

The film was made to be used in 
teacher or industrial training 
courses to give a complete visual 
lesson on preparing and using vis- 
ual lessons. Some of the uses of 
the projector shown are cellophane 
rolls and prepared sheets, prepared 
overlays, transparent plastics such 
as gears, and mixing of liquids. 

Transparency production is illus- 
trated from the simple methods of 



lettering diid (Irawi.ig and the scnsi- 
li/.i-d diazo foil rTiethod to the more 
clab<jrate machine techniques. Copy- 
ing pictures by the autopositive 
method for use on transparencies is 
also diinonstrateil. 

The 16-minute lesson ina\ be 
rented for .S2..50 plus postage, or 
purchased for S60.00. less 10'; to 
schools, from Bureau of Audio- 
Visual Instruction at the State Uni- 
versity of Iowa. Iowa City. 

TRADE REPORTS 

Stancil-HofFman Will Produce 
New Magnetic Recording Head 

♦ 1)K. \Uktin Klkin. general man- 
ager of the Sta.xcil-Hofkmax Cor- 
I'ORATION. has announced a new line 
of magnetic recording and repro- 
ducing heads. The California corpo- 
ration has been assembling magnetic 
heads for use on its own tape and 
film equipment for three years, but 
il has now taken over all magnetic 
head tooling and inventory of the 
Indiana Steel Products Company. 

The new heads will have the same 
phvsical appearance as the Indiana 
Steel Model TD-704. but Dr. Klein 
said the new production techniques 
afford greater uniformity and 
broader frequenc\ ranges as well as 
increased head life. 

.Standard heads record a track 
.200 inches wide, but the new Stan- 
lil-Hoffman product, with a 1.000 
turn coil, has a gap width of ap- 
proximately .(XX)5 inches. Special 
heads are available for either re- 
cording only or reproducing only. 

The Admatic Corporation Succeeds 
Chicago Equipment Manufacturer 

♦ The AoMATii: CoRPORATiei.N has 
succeeded the Admatic Projector 
Company, initiated and owned by 
M. M. Mummert. as manufacturers 
and distributors of the ".Admatic." 
The principal financial backers are 
John Hobart and Cyrus L. McKin- 
iion of Chicago. 

Sales of the self-contained unit 
which flashes 35mni slides on a 16 
l)\ 2.3-inch screen are under the 
supervision of R. M. Ryan, vice- 
president and sales manager. Gen- 
eral offices and display rooms are 
located at TO West Hubbard Street. 
Chicago. 

Reeves Soundcraft Appoints Neely 
OS Southwestern Representative 

♦ Frank B. Kuckks. Jr.. \ ie.- presi- 
dent (d RkKVI-;s SolNDlRVKT COR- 
PORATION, announced the appoint- 
ment of Neely Enterprises. Inc., as 
manufacturer's representatives to 
the electronic industry. 

States covered by Neely and its 
branch offices will include Cali- 
fornia. Nevada. .Arizona and N. M. 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 




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a film. Our top quality creative and production personnel can help 
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motion picture film processing is rapidly in- 
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country, presenting an excellent opportunity 
for wide-awake film producers and local labora- 
tories. The Houston-Fearless Model 22 Devel- 
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this profitable service in your area with only a 
moderate investment. 

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Model 22 is the same high Houston-Fearless 
quality that has been standard of the motion 
picture industry in Hollywood and throughout 
the world for 20 years. Other l6mm and 35mm 
Houston-Fearless black and white and color 
equipment toserve your particular requirements. 

U"r//e /or information on specially-built 
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A BUSINESS FILM REFERENCE AND RESEARCH LIBRARY AT YOUR SERVICE 

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."Address: Film Guide Library. Business Screen, 7064 
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Du Mont Executive Sees Trend 
To Multi-Television Set Homes 

♦ Drliniti- signs of a trend to two 
and three television receivers in 

I les have been reported by Da.n 

I). Hvi.PlN. general sales manager 
of the receiver division, Allen B. 
DuMoNT Laboratories, Inc. 

Of an estimated 22 million sets. 
2 to .S million already are second 
sets in the homes, Haplin said. He 
gave television's popularity with 
children and the present wide va- 
riety of programming as reasons. 

flalpin predicted that the num- 
ber of multi-television set homes 
will continue to increase following 
a pattern similar to the increase in 
radios in homes 20 years ago. It 
was in the 19.30's, he said, that 
families began buying radios for 
rooms besides the living room. 
Only about two percent of the fam- 
ilies now buying new television re- 
ceivers are turning in their old sets. 
The old receiver goes to the chil- 
dren, a recreation room, or maybe 
a bedroom. 

Halpin said that the trend at 
])resent prevails in the middle in- 
come brackets. 

Kodak Executive Is Photographer 
For South Pacific Expedition 

♦ Walter Chappelle, on leave of 
absence as an EAST^LA?I KoDAK 
Company executive, will shoot 7.000 
photographs and 11.000 feet of 16- 
mm Kodachrome film during a 
three-month expedition in the South 
Pacific which began in March. He is 
a photographer for the South Amer- 
ican Scientific Expedition of Yale 
LIniversity. 

The expedition seeks information 
about the Humbolt Current, a cold 
stream that stems from the Antarctic 
and flows along the South American 
coast as far as Ecuador. The scien- 
tists, in a fleet of four boats, will 
study characteristics of the current 
and will check migration and life 
habits of fish. Humboldt waters 
have a reputation as one of the 
world's most productive areas for 
big game fish. 

Reeves Acquires New Plant 

♦ Hazard B. Reeves, president of 
Reeves Soundcraft Corporation, 
New York, has announced that the 
magnetic products division of this 
corporation has acquired a new 
plant in Springdale. Connecticut 
which will enable them to increase 
their production facilities. 

Mr. Reeves stated that the pur- 
chase of the new plant was a direct 
result of the wide consumer accep- 
tance and expanded market for 
Reeves magnetic recording ta]ie and 
fihn now in wide demand. 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 




/ff/i^cAe// Cante^a corporation 

«66 WIST HAIVARD STRUT • OlINOAll 4, CAIIFORNIA • CAtll AOORISSt -MITCAMCO" 



tS% •< >>•• MafUll pilturat «li«<«H I" Ikaatrat (iir«U«h«Ut l|i,t 



^MJ^^^I 



filmed with a Milchall 



N 1 MUM! 



I I 1 M » I I 




We were naturally a bit puffed up when the first 
film we ever produced,* back in 1948, won a top 
Award at the Cleveland Film Festival. 

* "HIGH-WAT TO HAWAII" jor United Air Lines 

Since then, awards have been coming with increas- 
ing frequency, until in 1952, Gate & McGlone films 
were honored at nearly every important film com- 
petition in the United States and Europe. Here's 
the list. . . 



NATIONAL COMMITTEE ON 
FILMS FOR SAFOY 
"Day in Court" 

(International Harvester 
Company) 

BOSTON FILM FESTIVAL 
"United 6534" 

(United Air Lines) 

"Day in Court" 



EDINBURGH FILM FESTIVAL 
"United 6534" 

VENICE FILM FESTIVAL 
"United 6534" 

PORTLAND FILM FESTIVAL 
"United 6534" 

TOLEDO BUSINESS FILM 
FESTIVAL 

"Day in Court" 



And now the latest! by the National Visual Pres- 
entation Association and the Sales Executives Club 
of New York, for the best sales presentation on 
film in 19.52 . . . 

"KING of the COWBOYS" 

(Roy Rofiers Enlerpriges) 

Maybe ire can help yon produce 

an au-ard-winning film in 1953 



GATE & McGLONE 



h'ilms for Industry 

1521 CROSS ROADS OF THE WORLD • HOLLYWOOD 28. CALIFQR NIA 




NAVA Sends Exhibitor Invitations 
For 1953 Chicago Trade Show 

♦ Till- (irsi in\il;ilii.nv Ici ixliiliit 
in 111,- IV.S.S Natl.. rial Aiiclio-Visual 
Assiiiiatiiiii Trade Show were 
mailed in late March. The .show 
will lip held at the Hotel Sherman. 
Chicago, opening on August I and 
extending through August 5. 

According to Don White, a.s.so- 
ciation executive vice president, 
"indications point to an expanded 
attendance of 2.500 ke\ people in 
llip audio-visual market." Increa.sed 
cxliiliit space, all air conditioned. 
u ill he available this year at a 
slightly higher rental. The increase. 
White said, is due to higher labor 
costs at the hotel. 

AAanagement Training A-V Aids 
Listed in New Film Bibliography 

♦ A researih study of educational 
films, film strips, and recordings for 
use in management development 
programs has been completed for 
the second I tility Management 
Workshop. The Workshop, for ex- 
ecutives of electric, gas. telephone 
and water utilities, will be con- 
ducted b\ Columbia University. De- 
partment of Industrial Engineering. 
May 18-29. 1953. to study the char- 
acteristics required in executive 
jobs and how these characteristics 
can be discovered and developed. 

Copies of the Annotated Bibliog- 
raphy of Audio-Visual Aids for 
Management Development Pro- 
grams will be distributed to the 
utility executives attending the 
workshop and are also being offered 
for sale to the public by Research 
Service. 353 West 57 St., New York 
19. N. Y.. at $2.50 a copy. 

Professor Robert Teviot Living- 
ston of the Department of Industrial 
Engineering, workshop director, 
said that an extensive review had 
been made of 16mm motion pic- 
tures, filmstrips. and tape record- 
ings to select those which had spe- 
cific value for executive training 
and management development pro- 
grams. The bibliography contains 
data and comments on 109 different 
items and is subdivided into the fol- 
lowing sections: Management De- 
velopment Programs. The Executive 
and His Job. Selection and Place- 
ment. Executive Training. Industrial 
Engineering and Management. Su- 
pervision and Leadership. Human 
Relations. Public Relations, and So- 
cial Problems. 

In addition to providing copies 
of the study to the executives attend- 
ing the Workshop, a collection of 
the audio-visual aids is being as- 
sembled and will be available to the 
workshop members for viewing and 
c\aluation at .Xrden House, where 
the Workshop will be held. The 



ulililv c\c,uli\cs will also he pro- 
vided with work kits of other re- 
search materials and .selected publi- 
cations, will have a reference librarv 
collection at their dispo.sal. and will 
be as.sisted in their studies by the 
Columbia University staff. 



Case History of a Cahle 
Sponsor: Phelps Dodge Corpora- 
tion. 
Title: Cable Crossing, 25 min.. 
color, produced by Science Pic- 
tures. Inc. 
M To provide a new reservoir of 
electric power for Staten Island, the 
(Consolidated Edison Corp.. last vear. 
had a cable constructed which 
leached across New York Bay and 
joined the company's power station 
cm the island to another in Brook- 
Ivn. 

This unprecedented engineering 
feat has been recorded in this new 
film, sponsored by Phelps Dodge, 
which supplied the compression 
cable that made the job possible. 

Con Ed's cable crossing consists 
of a continuous pipe buried 25 feet 
deep in the mud on the bottom of 
the mile-wide Narrows that separate 
Brooklyn from Staten Island. At its 
deepest point, the cable, in its 25 
foot trench, is 105 feet from the 
surface. 

The film shows how the trench 
was dug and the coated steel pipe 
hauled across from Staten Island to 
Brooklyn while up the river in 
^ (inkers Phelps Dodge constructed 
the fully-insulated copper power 
cable. 

Cable Crossing uses on-the-spot 
photography taken during the big 
job. as well as technical animation 
to show a cross section of the Bay 
with the pipe being laid. It will be 
made available to technical schools, 
engineers and other interested par- 
ties by Phelps Dodge district offices. 



EXPERIENCED 

MOTION PICTURE 

SALESMAN 

X^anted immediately 
by well established 
Southern Ohio motion 
picture producer. 

State experience and 
salary. 

Write Box 53-2A 

Blsinkss Screen 
TOfi-l Slitriilan Kiiail, Chicago 26. III. 



^ C K K i; N M A (, A Z I N E 




iptr 



by 

ound 



Sound can suggest, can create imagery, can captivate. 
As Robert Browning described the Pied Piper's rat-tempting 
shrill notes, it can suggest "scraping tripe, and putting apples, 
wondrous ripe, into a cider press's gripe." Or sound can 
suggest the "joyous land" which lured the children from Hamelin 
Town; the land where "honey-bees had lost their stings, and 
horses were born with eagles' wings." 

Yes, imagery-by-sound can captivate. And, when imaginative 
aural imagery is coupled with the imaginative visual, your 
film-message pierces deep into the mind and emotions. 

Here, at Unifilms, the uses of the psychology of sound 

are fundamental . . . and the imaginative application of sound 

is as basic as imaginative scripting and direction. 

You are cordially in\ited to hear— as well as to see— a 
cross-section of Unifilms' work . . . and hear about 
the economies in production effected by Unifilms. 

Why not make a date by telephone . . . now. 



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• FIELD REPORT ON" FILM I'ROflRESS OVERSE.XS . 

French Industry on the Screen 



l)y Tom Hope 



THE USE OF AUDIO-VISUAL AIDS in 
France is growing. There is a 
certain amount of glamorous appeal 
attached to the motion picture in 
training as well as to many of the 
other audio and visual media now 
being used in the United States. The 
sponsored film is not as common 
in France and other parts of Europe 
as in the U.S. Such producers as 
Sundial in Paris are turning out ex- 
cellent fibns for sponsors. If high 
quality is maintained, the sponsored 
film can make a great contribution 
in education — both in schools and 
for adult groups. 

Sponsored films in sales promo- 
tion and advertising are also mov- 
ing ahead. Merlin & Gerin in Gren- 
oble are making good use of films 
in sales work. Shell Francaise, the 
coal mining interests. Renault auto- 
mobiles. Electro-Mecanique in Lyon. 
Teleniecanique in Paris, Air France. 
Textiles Artificiels. just to name a 
few. are using films extensively in 
employee training, sales work and 
public relations. 

Tariff Bars on Equipment 

Generally speaking American- 
made equipment is not used to a 
great extent in Europe because of 
the high tariff rates imposed on for- 
eign equipment imported into such 
nations as France. That country 
alone has a number of well-kno^vn 
projector manufacturers. Most of 
the projectors now in use in France 
are two-case large size models. An 
Italian manufacturer has come out 
with the only single-case light- 
weight model we saw in Europe ex- 
cept for the few American ones 
which had filtered in. The Italian 
machine is the smallest single-case 
unit we have ever seen and per- 
forms quite well. 

The Ministry of Education Audio- 
Visual Center in Paris estimates 
that there are approximately 6900 
motion picture projectors in the 
French school systems. This 
amounts to an average of one pro- 
jector for each two high schools in 
the country. There are 73,000 ele- 
mentary schools. The Ministry of 
Agriculture Cinemagraphic Depart- 
ment estimates that there are some 
500 projectors in rural communities 
— used in farm organizations head- 
quartered in a growing institution 
in France — the conununity farm 
center. This center can best be de- 
scribed as the headquarters for 



what is something like our county 
extension service. 

In January a sur\'ey was to be 
started in industry to determine to 
the number of projectors in use and 
the extent of their training pro- 
grams. The FSNIC, a French pro- 
fessional engineering society which 
has put out the best film informa- 
tion handbook to date in France, 
claims that there are 500 projec- 
tors available to industry. (It must 
be noted there that some of these 
projectors might be and likely are 
included in the educational figures 
because there is a certain amount 
of borrowing of equipment back 
and forth between schools, rural 
groups and industry.) 

Projectors in Plants 
I personally visited about fifteen 
of France's leading companies. In 
those fifteen we found a total of 
eighty-seven projectors or an aver- 
age of about six machines per com- 
pany. Actually six firms had only 
one projector while five had more 
than ten. eighteen being the greatest 
number in any one company. All 
of these firms used the machines ex- 
clusively for training purposes with 
the exception of one company who 
had fourteen projectors which were 
continuous projectors looking very 
much like a television set. These 
projectors are used for a dual pur- 
pose — training and also sales and 
advertising. 

In AF.\P (the French productiv- 
ity center where 1 worked) we had 
105 Hortson projectors which had 
been purchased with Marshall Plan 
money and rented to the French 
government. The AFAP Audio- 
Visual Service (which was my 
prime responsibility) in turn rents 
the machines to companies not own- 
ing their own. The Hortson is a 
two-case job of very high quality. 
It operates similarly to our Ameri- 
can machines with one exception. 
There is a special button which is 
used in threading. By merely push- 
ing it runs the projector forward 
to check tlireading as long as you 
hold the button in. 

Europe's Filmstrip Machines 
Filnistrip projectors are radically 
different from ours. They are very 
small units about the size of a cigar 
box. In England they use double- 
frame almost exclusively. France on 
(continued on pace 26) 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 




and that's all there is to it! 



DULL PICTURES are visual double-talk. Like verbal double-talk, 
they confuse and annoy. But sharp, clear pictures, with or without 
words, are the most compelling medium of all. 

FOR 16 MM AUDIENCES of 100 or more people, there's only one 
way you can project sharp, clear pictures. That's with carbon-arc 
lighting ... 4 times brighter, Vi cheaper to operate than the next 
best source. And "National" carbon arcs are simple to operate; 
safe, silent, steady burning. 

IF YOU USE or intend to use auditorium projection of 16 mm films 
for training, business, education or amusement, don't overlook this 
simple and economical way to add new vitality, color brilliance 
and realistic detail to your showings. 




The term "National" is a rtgittered trade-mark 
of Union Carbide and Carbon Corporation 

NATIONAL CARBON COMPANY 

A Division of Union Carbide and Carbon Corporation 
30 East 42nd Street. New York 1 T, N. Y. 
Diilricl Sale, Offices: Allanla. Chicago. Dallas. Kansas City. New York, Pinsburgh, San Frai 
In Canada: National Carbon Limited, Montreal, Toronto, Winnipeg 



NUMBER 2 . VOLUME It 



How Vogue Wright films 
are used in training. 




To teach commercial 
vehicle drivers safe driving practices. 



,^o^^o^- 



The National Association 
of Automotive Mutual Insurance Companies. 




Ten high-way safet)' films covering 
major causes of accidents and how to prevent tliem. 

Talk over your particular problem with a Vogue Wright representative 




Report on Europe: 



{COMIMKr) FROM I'AUK 24) 

the otluT liaiid i> leaning toward 
single-frarm- although both are 
used. The projectdr.* do not click in 
position from one frame to another. 
In other i\ords when turning the 
film ahead it rolls .smoothly and the 
operator visually must stop on the 
proper frame line. As a result, the 
film movement from one frame to 
the next is slow and deliberate. It 
is next to impossible to use this type 
of projector with a recording, ie.. 
in sound filmstrips or sound slides. 
Likewise, the little projectors are 
not duo-type taking 2x2 slides as 
well as filmstrips. Because of their 
simplicity, however, they cost only 
S25.()(). roughly speaking. 

Filmstrips in Wide Use 
Almost every elementary school 
in France (59.000 out of 73,0001 
has at least one filmstrip projector, 
and 900 high schools have 1000 
projectors. Filmstrips are the prin- 
cipal audio-vi.sual aid used in the 
lower grades. Industry uses them 
very little. The sound filmstrip or 
sound slide projector as w'e know 
it is unknown in France. When a 
number of French industrial lead- 
ers saw an American sound slide 
projector at a special demonstration 
which we held just before leaving 
France, they were wild about it. Lp 
to this time the Mutual Security 
Agency has been steering clear of 
them because no equipment was 
available. Our session, however, 
showed that there was a great deal 
of interest in their use. 

Lantern slides, overhead trans- 
jiarency projectors, opaque projec- 
tors and wire recorders are catching 
on fast. The magnetic tape recorder 
is begiinning to find a market. One 
magnetic projector ( Frent-h make I 
is supposed to come onto the mar- 
ket in a few months. They are very 
interested in the Bell & Howell ma- 
chine which thev have seen at the 
MSA Technical Media Section. 
Minnesota Mining & Manufacturing 
opened a Paris branch this last fall 
which will stimulate the use of mag- 
netic film and tape. 
Vu-Grapli Favored in France 
The Beseler Vu-Graph is the most 
used overhead transparency projec- 
tor in industry and it is destined for 
a good future. The French have a 
smaller, simpler and much cheaper 
model which is used a little, but it 
lacks many features of the Ameri- 
can machine. Because of tariffs the 
Vu-Graph sells for about double the 
price in the States. The dealers in 
F^aris hopes to start manufacturing 




their own Vu-Graphs in Paris using 
the American patents. 

C(dor film is used very little. The 
cost is about the same as in this 
country but the photographic and 
sound quality is inferior to our 
c(jlor. Commercial Kodachrome is 
not available at all There is a great 
deal of interest in color, and un- 
doubtedly it will soon be u.sed when 
the processing is improved. Tech- 
nicolor is used some, but because of 
high costs and slow delivery of 
prints, it has only limited use. I 
did not see any Agfa color in 16- 
mm. There are some films in 35- 
nim Agfa which were marvelous. 
I Thev came niainlv from behind the 
Iron Curtain — Russia and Czecho- 
slovakia. I 

Beaded Screens Predominate 

Glass-beaded screens are used 
predominately in Europe. There are 
a number of manufacturers in 
Europe plus some importation of 
American makes. A deal of interest 
was evidenced in the aluminum 
coated plastic screen which can be 
used in a room only partially dark- 
ened. As yet there were no models 
of the Radiant "classroom" screen 
in France. 

lndustry-«-ide, Austria is consid- 
ered to be making the greatest 
strides with films. Denmark and 
Holland are effectively using film- 
strips. Germany is making great 
progress in film usage. Greece. Italy 
and Turkey have a long wav to go. 

Educational, industrial and agri- 
cultural leaders are extremely inter- 
ested in films and other audio-visual 
aids. The Ministry of Education is 
now building a new Audio-Visual 
Center at St. Cloud on the outskirts 
of Paris. For industry. A.F.A.P., 
the French Productivity Center, has 
just opened a new Audio-Visual 
\ids Center in Paris. 

The audio-visual manufacturers 
are coming up with new and inter- 
esting equipment and ideas. With 
our closer ties to Europe being de- 
velojied into a "two way street" the 
whole field of audio-visual educa- 
tion should benefit in the free 
world. ^ 

Ivii: Till- authiir is head of film arlivities 
at Cen.-ial Mills and served last year as 
:iu.li.ni»iial lonsultanl to the French 
(iuvernnienl, headquartered in Paris. 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 




SALES MANAGERS 

ARE LOOKING FOR YOU ! 



Today, 20,000 sales managers are look- 
ing for better ways to strengthen and 
train their far-flung sales forces and 
dealers. 

Many of these sales managers may not 
know it yet. but they're looking for you 
—a sound slidefilm producer. Because 
they may not know that the best way to 
train a spread-out sales force is with a 
sound slidefilm. The potential is there. 
And the time was never better to turn 
that potential into profit! 

Here's how you do it. Choose com- 
panies that depend upon salesmen for 
volume. Get in to see the sales manager. 




Tell him your story— show him how he 
can use sound slidefilm to do an effec- 
tive, economical job of training his 
salesmen and his dealers. 

Naturally, for the audio part of your 
slidefilm, you'll want to specify RCA 
■Victor slidefilm recordings. You know 
from your own experience that RCA 
Victor delivers the clearest, crispest 
sound attainable in slidefilm recordings. 
Use this point when you talk to your 
prospect; it can help you close the sale. 

Remember— the market for sound slide- 
film has never been better. Be sure you 
get your share! 



Sales Managers need Sound Slidefilms 
for telling Salesmen and Dealers: 

— how to get more display space 

— how to develop local promotions 

— how to use selling time more efticiently 

— how a new product was developed 

— how to localize national merchandising campaigns 

— how product quality is controlled 

and much more! 



For jtiil iletiiils on sliclefilin recordings, contact office nearest you. 

HOLLYWOOD 
1016 N. Sycamore Ave. 
Dcpl. E-30 
Hollywood 38. Calif. 
HILLSIDE 5171 



NEW YORK 
630 Fifth Ave. 
Dept. E-30 
New York 20. NY 

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CHICAGO 

445' N. Lake Shore Dr. 

Dept. E-30 

Chicago 11, 111. 

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ustom Record Sales 



HIS MASTER'S voice 



RADIO CORPORATION OF AMERICA 



RCA VICTOR DIVISION 



\ on M K I I 



Sound Slidefilm 

■^ The increasing success of the automatic low frequency 
system is making sound slidefilm one of the fastest grow- 
ing media for sales training, technical training, safety, and 
selling. 

LOW FREQUENCY "30/50" AUTOMATIC 

The low frequency "30/50" technique of automatic 
sound shdefilm has become the accepted system in a 
large number of major industries and organizations. 

OVER 1,000,000 "30/50" SLIDEFILMS 

Producers and their clients have distributed more than 
one million copies of automatic "30/50" slidefilms on 
a wide variety of subjects. 

OVER 20,000 "30/50" PROJECTORS 

A simple demonstration will show why there are more 
than 20,000 automatic sound slidefilm projectors in 
use. 



WRITE OR MAIL COUPON TODAY! 




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THE WORLD'S LARGEST PRODUCER OF SOUND SLIDEFILM PROJECTORSI 



Production Lines 



Firms Urge Retention of CMP 

♦ Retention of the Controlled Ma- 
terials Plan in its present form was 
strongly urged last month by the 
Sound Recorder Manufacturers In- 
dustry Advisory Committee meet- 
ing with the National Production 
Authority, Department of Com- 
merce. Committeemen made the rec- 
ommendation after revealing that 
copper and aluminum supplies con- 
tinue tight in the face of increasing 
military needs and a strengthening 
consumer and commercial demand 
for tape, wire and disc recorders. 

The industry representatives also 
pointed to difficulties in procure- 
ment of such components as motors, 
ruggedized tubes and special-type 
transformers containing scarce 
nickel alloys. 

Committee members said the in- 
dustry continues to be seriously 
threatened by shortages of engi- 
neer and tool and die makers. They 
estimated the current nation-wide 
shortage of engineers, placed at 50, 
000 is pyramiding each year, with 
only 15 to 18.000 graduates a year 
from engineering colleges. Shortage 
of skilled tool makers is attribut- 
able largely to a diminishing ap- 
prenticeship program, members 
said. 

Tape-recorder makers reported 
substantial increase in consumer 
demand for combination radio-tape 
recorders that the industry may not 
be able to meet. 

Kodak Sonotrack Coating Available 
for Double-Perforated 16mni Rim 

♦ The magnetic sound track coat- 
ing service offered by the Eastman 
Kodak Company now includes 
service on double-perforated 16mm 
film, available through Kodak 
dealers. 

"Sonotrack Coating" is applied 
to the base side of double-per- 
forated film in the same position 
sound tracks appear on single-per- 
porated film. The charge, for either 
type of film, is S.025 per foot with 
a SIO.OO minimum for each order. 
Any repair work required to put 
films in condition for coating is 
charged on a time basis. 

Dealers can order "Sonotrack 
Coating" when they return their 
customers' 16mm Cine-Kodak film 
for processing. 

Sound Transfer Facilities Offered 
by Maurer and Precision Labs 

♦ The transfer of sound recording 
in almost any form to and from any 
recording medium is a new service 
offered bv Precision Film Labora- 



TOKiES, 21 W. 46th Street, New 
York. 

The technique was developed in 
conjunction with J. A. Maurer, 
Inc., manufacturers of professional 
16mm sound motion picture equip- 
ment. 

Precision said its re-recording 
service features top quality transfer 
of sound from practically any type 
of magnetic or disc recording to 16 
or 35mm film optical track, and 
will provide producers with greater 
flexibility in the use of magnetic 
and film sound tracks in combina- 
tioji. 

Forecasts Closed Circuit TV 
Use Greater Than Home Field 

♦ The use of closed circuit televi- 
sion by American business and in- 
dustrv can easily become more 
widespread and important in the 
future than television in the home, 
a video executive forecast last 
month. 

Speaking before the Texas So- 
ciety of Professional Engineers, 
Herbert E. Taylor, Jr., manager of 
the television transmitter division, 
Allen B. DuMont Laboratories, Inc., 
told the group that while use of 
industrial television today is only a 
small fraction of the over-all tele- 
casting operation, its use is already 
spread over a sufficiently varied 
field to give a good indication of 
the all-inclusive role it will play 
in America's future. 

"Closed circuit television looms 
as a business, scientific and indus- 
trial tool whose potential is limited 
only bv the imagination and fore- 
sight of those who use it," the Du 
Mont executive declared. 

Taylor pointed out the advances 
made possible by television in the 
field of medicine as well as outlin- 
ing the extensive uses to which 
closed circuit video has been put in 
the field of general education. 

"Television offers a golden op- 
portunity to education generally 
and to the state of Texas specifically, 
with 18 channels allocated by the 
F.C.C. here to achieve greater edu- 
cational progress than has been af- 
forded up to now." 

Taylor told the audience that the 
present uses of television in the na- 
tional defense blueprint were tre- 
mendous but was prevented from 
elaborating because of security 
regulations. 

"It would probably stagger the 
imagination of the average citizen 
if the military establishment could 
lift the security curtain and reveal 
the iiianv advanced uses to which 
the industrial type of television is 
being used today by our armed 
forces.'" he said. 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 




CONSOLIDATED FILM INDUSTRIES 



NEW 16mm LAB 



Consolidated is proud to make available to 
users of 16nim film its new 16mm laboratory. 




This is the first large, fully-equipped, 
professional laboratory ever built for the 
processing of 16mm film exclusively. It 
incorporates every advanced facility for 
attaining the finest possible quality in 
16n]ni black & white and color. 



//I Every Field, One Name Stands Out. 

In Film Laboratories. It's ... V r I 

CONSOLIDATED FILM INDUSTRIES 



y.)9 Sfwnril Street 
llollynood 38, 
(California 



phone: llOllyuood 9-1441 



NUMBER 2 • VOLUME 14 



29 







NOTE: "Cine-Voice" Camera is being 
operated from 6 volt "Jeep" battery, 
using Auricon PS-14 Power Convertor. 



H^llo Folks! 



lO 



forrehse on 7e/emm/ 

The parents of American Gl's overseas are today visiting with their sons 
through the medium of "Talking-Pictures" shown on Television. The men 
are interviewed and filmed by the major News Services and Broadcasting 
Networks operating from military outposts all over the world. Auricon 
Equipment is providing high-fidelity, trouble-free operation under the most 
rigorous conditions of climate and travel. At home or overseas, Auricon 
Cameras are proving over and over again, that they can "take it!" 

Auricon 16 mm Sound-On-Film Cameras are ideal working tools for the 
production of Television Newsreels, Film Commercials, Dramatic Inserts 
and local Candid-Camera programming. Write for complete Auricon Catalog. 



BERNDT-BACH, INC. 

7387 BEVERLY BLVD., LOS ANGELES 36, CALIF. 



MANUFACTURERS OF SOUND-ON-FILM RECORDING EQUIPMENT SINCE 1931 




AURICON CINE-VOICE 16 mm CAMERA... 

$695.00 (and up), with a 30-day money-back guarantee. 
You must be satisfied. Write today for free illustrated 
"Cine-Voice" Folder describing this newest 16 mm 
optical soundonfilm Camera. 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



S GOOD BUSINESS TO USE i^GiJG7*G 




TAPE RECORDING 

REVERE TAPE RECORDER— Takes dicfolion, records important meetings, 
speeches, inventory, production detoils! Reviews important points for sales or 
employee training. Permits sales staff to practice and improve sales technique. 
Doubles as on entertoiner at company social offoirs. 



Modal T-700 — Btlngi you performance ond high 
fidelity heretofore obtainable only in costly pro- 
feiiional broodcoit equipment. E«cluiiye inde« 
counter permitj instant location of any port of 
recorded reel. Automatic "keyboard" controli. 
Full two houri play on each 7-inch reel of croi- 
obte, re-usable tope. Complete with microphone, 
radio attachment cord, 2 reeli (one with tope) 
ond carrying cole $225.00 



TR-800— Some o> obov* with buill-in 

""^'O $277.50 

Spatial Studio Modoli— Spood 7.50 

T-10 — Complete with microphone, radio attach- 
ment cord, 2 reels (one with tape) ond corrying 

^°" $235.00 

TII-20— Some as above with built-in 




MOVIE PROJECTION 

REVERE "\6" SOUND PROJECTOR-Projects your soles story at lis best! 
Brilliont, clear, natural picture and true "theater" lone, lightweight and exceptionally 
compact— for easy portability from company to company. So easy to thread 
and operate — your beginning salesmen will use if like an expert! 
750-watt lamp brilliance; fast 2-inch F 1.6 coated lens. Complete with speaker- 
carrying case and cord, take-up reel, 1600' reel extension arm, instructions. $325.00 




SOUND MOVIES 

REVERE SOUND-MOVIE SYNCHRO-TAPE- Increoses the volue of your 
old silent films — by adding sound. Use films again and again by changing the 
message to fit each new business siluolion. Moke revisions quickly, easily. 
Revere Sound-Movie Synchro-Tape is especially designed to enable yoo to 
synchronize picture and sound perfectly. One 5' reel provides sound for 
800 feet of 8mm film or 1600 feel of 16mm film. Complete with 
Synchro-Reflector, directions. Per reel, $7.85 



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CHICAGO 16, IlllNOIS 



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6039 HOLLYWOOD BLVD. • Phone Hollywood 9-7205 • HOLLYWOOD 28, CALIFORNIA 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



FOR THE sponsored motion picture 
medium as in newspaper, maga- 
zine, or radio advertising, the pay- 
off is in people. Circulation of 
iiiotion picture films has resisted 
siiund measurement practices until 
the last decade and. understandably, 
since the medium has been in the 
process of rapid evolution since the 
advent of sound in the early '3()'s 
and following the wartime lull in 
16nun sound equipment sales. 

Channels of Cinulation 

Sponsored motion pictures reach 
ihe American people through three 
primary channels of distribution: 

1. Films are distributed either di- 
rectly by sponsors or handled by 
commercial distributors to the or- 
ganized groups, institutions, 
churches, schools, industrial plants, 
etc. owning or having ready access 
to 16mm sound projection equip- 
ment, now reliably estimated to ap- 
proach 500,000 operating units in 
the U. S. 

2. Films of a sufficient public in- 
terest quality are accepted for pro- 
gramming in the regular theatrical 
channels. The number of theatres 
accepting sponsored short subjects 
is in direct ratio to the interest qual- 
ity of the films c^fered. New York's 
famed Radio City Music Hall has 
plaved sponsored subjects: thou- 
sands of neighborhood theatres are 
regular "free" out'.ets. 

3. Sponsored films have been 
«idelv accepted by television sta- 
tions for sustaining use. on the same 
basis as theatrical selection. Films 
acceptable to t.v. program directors 
must necessarily be of excellent pro- 
fessional quality, with a minimum 
of direct advertising, and a basic 
subject theme of real public interest. 
Networks have accepted and played 
lop-flight material on this basis. 

Merchant-Sponsored Showings 

The non-theatrical channel is sub- 
ject to variations in outlet. For 
example, merchant-sponsored enter- 
lalnnitnt film showings in rural 
low ns and resort areas I primarily 
during the sunnner season) have 
provided large audiences to spon- 
sors intrested in the adult, rural 
character of this distribution outlet, 
("onvenlion and county lair show- 
ings, etc. may also account for large 
audiences via 16rnm projection. 

The farm implpincnt companies 
have pioneered most successfully in 
special "enterlaimnents" for local 
dealer clientele, wherein large num- 
bers of farmers and (heir families 
iilli nd film showings of new j)rod- 
ucts. enjoy light entertainment and 
afterwards meet in neighborly 



\ ( I 1 I \I I". II 



AUDIENCES, U. S. A 

Editorial Foreword to a Business Screen Report 
on Current Trends in Sponsored Film Distrilmtioii 



fashicm nvcr coffee and doughnuts. 
Caterpillar. Deere and Harvester 
are among those companies follow- 
ing this friendly, effective practice. 

Huge audiences of employees and 
their families are often gathered in 
])lant town assembly halls for pre- 
miere showings of company-spon- 
sored films; cooking schools featur- 
ing home economics films attract 
thousands of housewives through 
the years. 

AM across the land, in this most 
"group-minded" of all countries, the 
16mm sound projector is the pro- 
gram chairman's best ally; the 
answer to the safety counsellor's 
prayers: the salesman's '"open ses- 
ame" when he is equipped with 
good films which his prospects uiant 
to see. 

.\d Films Date Back to '93 

Such is the sponsored motion pic- 
ture, the "new" medium as old as 
the flickering shadows which danced 
the Highland Fling for Dewar's 
Scotch on the wall of a Broadway 
building back in 1803 (the New 
York Police ordered the showings 
stopped because of snarled traffic, 
then as now I : as "dated" as Inter- 
national Harvester's Back to the Old 
Farm I vintage 1911 1 and as up-to- 
date as the Chrysler three-dimen- 
sional movies which drew' record 
attendance at the New York World's 
Fair a decade ago. (Now being 
emulated without any considerable 
technical improvement by the en- 
tertainment industry-at-large. ) 

Production and L SE of sponsored 
films are inseparable but it must be 
remembered that a single showing 
of such a picture may accomplish 
the sponsor's entire objective. (One 
such showing did just that for a 
major automobile manufacturer who 
had to present a clear, understand- 
able review of a plant improvement 
project to the board of directors. I 

Sale>. Not Totals. Count 

Small distribution figures arc of 
little concern to the company waul- 
ing to demonstrate the value of niml- 
cm sewage disposal systems lo lnwn 
fathers. The one showing that helps 
s<:ll a half-million dollar lot of 
i-quipnitnt is the one that counts. 

But if your product has wide- 
spread distribution or \our com- 
pain's problem is of concern to 



large numbers of ptuple, llie audi- 
ences are there — national, regional 
or localized, if need be. And U. S. 
business is learning rapidly that you 
measure the true cost of good spon- 
sored films by the following: 

Larger Audiences Lower Cost 

1. The total cost of a film, includ- 
ing production, prints, distribution 
expense, is divisible by the total 
audience. Such experienced sponsors 
as the Aluminum Company of 
America, for example, have brought 
the cost per person reached for a 
typical 27-minute Technicolor mo- 
tion picture down to one and three- 
quarters cents each, reaching 35,- 
000.000 people. 

2. The belter the film, in terms of 
concept and production quality, the 
longer its lije and the greater the 
audience available to amortize it. 

3. L nwise economies in distribu- 
tion budget raise the cost of film 
programs, lower the medium's value 
in the eyes of management. 

Most Complete of All Media 
These axioms are only part of the 
story. The sponsored motion picture 
is unique among media, for it is the 
most complete oj all modern forms 
of idea communication. Once an 
audience has gathered for a film 
showing, the immeasurable power 
of sight-and-sound are condiined to 
make the most complex facts under- 
standable: the screen is colorful and 
compelling, it has emotional qual- 
ities at its command. Its power to 
bring about decisive action has been 
demonstrated again and again in 



communltywide campaigns which 
films have stimulated; in dealer co- 
operation enlisted and in numerous 
instances of product sales stimu- 
lated. 

Printed advertising through news 
papers and magazines is simpler yet 
limited to the few fleeting seconds of 
impression gai/ted: once the com- 
plexities of production are over- 
tome, the film delivers for uninter- 
rupted periods of ten, tivenly to 
thirty minutes duration. 

Distribution Is a Big Story 

These pages of Business Scree.n's 
current report on sponsored film 
distribution progress were first in- 
tended to supplement the Third An- 
nual Production Review number re- 
cently published. It soon became 
?pparent. as it always has been, that 
distribution was another and full 
half of the sponsored film story. 

A book on the subject, however, 
would hardly begin to do it justice 
and yet a book would be outdated 
before its binding was set. For dis- 
tribution is a continual and expand- 
ing process. For example: 

Each year, the number of 16nim 
sound motion picture projectors in 
use ( and therefore available to 
sponsors for show ings I is increas- 
ing at about 40.000 units. These 
(irojectors are going to schools, 
churches, community organizations, 
elc. as well as to induslrv itself. 

Example of Constant Growth 
In 1945. one commercial distrib- 
utor ( Modern Talking Picture Serv- 
ice. Inc. I was handling 3.451 16mm 
prints of all subjects then in circu- 
lation through its network of re- 
gional film exchanges: in 1949. 
10.500 prints were in constant de- 
mand: by 1953 there were nearly 
22.500 16mm sound prints serving 
Ihe audiences arranged by this na- 
tional distributor. The number of 
(CONTIMED ON THE NE\T I'AGE) 




COMPARISON OF CHANNELS FOR FILM DISTRIBUTION 



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YEAR 







Television and theatrical bookings reach sizeable totals quickly 
but 16mni showings reach larger selective audience on rising 
curve during years of useful performance. 



AUDIENCES, U.S.A.: 

ICO-NTIMEU FROM PRECEDING PACE I 

bookings had increased from 10,538 
per month in 1945 to more than 
37.000 per month in 1949 and in a 
recent month of 1953. Modern ful- 
filled 65,000 bookings for its spon- 
sored film clientele. 

TV Stations Increasing 
Television has become a new 
"plus" factor in sponsored film dis- 
tribution. Sustaining use of the bet- 
ter sponsored subjects has been 
widespread during the past year: as 
the number of stations increases 
during 1953. it will undoubtedly 
continue to expand the audiences 
which ranged from 1 million to as 
much as 50 million for individual 
sponsors during the past year. One 
commercial distributor made 738 
bookings of sponsored films on a 
sustaining basis to t.v. stations, 
reaching a total audience estimated 



by Pulse ratings to approximate 
153.713.000 persons. 

The "operating'" story of distribu- 
tion begins to be told in the ensuing 
pages of the 1953 Distribution Sur- 
vey Report. ^ 

Commercial Distribution 
-tf Like the wire services and radio 
networks, the commercial distribu- 
tors of sponsored films are helping 
establish and build large, con- 
venient and comparatively in- 
expensive channels of distribution. 
Last year four principal com- 
panies in this field handled a total 
of 1,707.759 bookings in the 16mm 
field alone. They reached over 
160.000.000 people, plus additional 
millions via television and in 
theatres. Facts and figures on these 
individual distribution services are 
available to sponsors and are 
worthy of considerable study and 
comparative internal cost analysis. 



DISTRIBUTION AMORTIZES PRODUCTION COST 

As audience totals increase, the cost-per-person reached 
has gone as low as 1 '/2c including all costs of the picture. 



$75,000 
INITI AL COST 




Audience Data Helps the Sponsor 

Opinions of Ij.stTs Give \ aluulile .Advice on Films 
bv Vt illiaiii Oard. Modern Talking Picture Service 



NUMBER OF PEOPLE 3-000,000- 



iiT KNOW that two million peo- 
1 pie saw our film last year 
but I'd like to know ivliot 
good we got out of it," might run 
the plaint of today's film sponsors. 
And indeed. such unanswered 
questions point up a weakness in- 
herent in many distribution pro- 
grams. While distribution concerns 
itself mainly with securing large 
audiences of the proper kind, it 
can also provide top manage- 
ment with the information required 
for intelligent evaluation of the 
program. Even an '18c dollar' rep- 
resents a cash expenditure from 
which some analyzable return 
should be expected. How many 
budding fihn programs go on the 
rocks because of a lack of really 
incisive data on audience influence? 

Evaluation Data Lsable 

And so it becomes apparent that 
distribution is a many-pronged 
task. Not only must the sponsored 
film be made easy and convenient 
for its public to secure, but the 
distribution system itself must be 
so devised that the data for evalua- 
tion is produced in a usable and 
accurate form. 

This data breaks down broadly 
into quantitative and qualitative 
units of information. The quantita- 
tive statistic would include a 
tabulation of number of audiences 
leached, number of actual film 
showings, viewer breakdowns by 
age level, sex, geographic area, 
etc. Such information lends itself 
to automatic tabulation methods, 
such as IBM equipment now in 
dailv use at Modern's headquar- 
ters in New ^ ork. 

How Do Audiences React? 
The qualitative dimension, how- 
ever, is a bit more involved since 
it deals with opinion which cannot 
easilv be sorted into definite cate- 
gories. There are all shades of 
meaning from warm approbation 
running the gamut to complete 
disapproval. Producers and spon- 
sors owe it to themselves and to 
their future film plans to secure 
this complete statement of film 
user opinion. The results are some- 
times surprising but they are al- 
wavs useful. A glance at represen- 
tative comments indicates that the 
only way to reflect their diversity 
adequately is to quote thos? com- 



ments of other than a perfunctory 
nature. 

Occasionally the film that looks 
best to the producer and sponsor 
»ill draw a generally poor reac- 
tion: more frequently we are sur- 
prised by the enthusiastic com- 
ments received for an apparently 
pedestrian film. The point, of 
course, is simply that the ullimaU 
audience is the final arbiter of suc- 
cess or failure, and it is to this 
willing jury that we must turn for 
the true qualitative measure of our 
films. Tliose of us who see large 
numbers of films easily acquire a 
fixed viewpoint so that the need for 
true user reaction is all the more 
stringent. 

Steps to Insure Success 

What can producers and spon- 
sors do to give their films the best 
chance of meeting with favorable 
audience reaction with a high de- 
gree of assurance? One step is cer- 
tainly the reevaluation of past pro- 
ductions against recorded user re- 
;'ction. But it is questionable 
whether this, in itself, is sufficient. 
\^ ould it not be possible to subject 
new scripts and fihn plans to some 
type of pretesting? Perhaps a 
method as outlined here would be 
workable: 

1. Determine who will be the 
desired audience for a given film 
in the script jtlanning stage. Ap- 
proach a sampling of the pro- 
jected audience with a suitably 
worded questionnaire, outlining 
the general subject matter to be 
covered, and asking for prefer- 
ences as to running time, points 
to be covered, etc. 

2. \^'hen a finished script is 
ready, submit it to selected per- 
sons, representative of the poten- 
tial audience, for suggestions and 
comments. 

3. At the work print stage hold 
'sneak previews' for panels of au- 
diences to get specific reactions. 

How well would such a program 
work? It might be of considerable 
assistance at many stages in pro- 
duction and planning. But good 
films, like other products 0/ imagi- 
native creation, cannot be made 
according to any joolprooj, auto- 
matic formula. A'o matter how 
carefully surveys may he made, 
there is no substitute for creative 
skill. .\ol all films can be great, 
but for this reason the great ones 
are all the more appreciated ichen 
ihey come along. 9° 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 




m "Thread- easy" fllm path proves It with these amazing rc<«ulu: Many actually 

againi Guests at a recent trade show threaded the machine in less than 7 seconds. 

helped prove Ihc RCA "400" easiest to Some threaded it in less than 20 seconds. 

thread... 473 ol'them threaded this projector Most threaded it in less than 30 seconds. 

Easiest WatjTb Show Films 



Actual time tests pr(;ve the "thread- 
easy" RCA "400" projector is the world's 
fastest threading projector. But they prove 
more than just speed. They pro\c you 
can't beat the RCA "400" for downright 
easy operation. 

You can trust your RCA "400" 
No need to cross your fingers when you 
turn on your RCA "^IK)." ^ou Avion- 
you'll have a picture. .And you get a clear, 
steady picture— steadier than Society of 



Motion Picture and Television Engineers 
standards. 

Prove it yourself 
Mal.e your own test on the RCA "400" 
projector. Check it side-by-side with other 
16mm projectors. Prove to yourself that 
it's the easiest to thread, best in perform- 
ance. Quiet in operation. 

Ask your local RCA visual proilucts 
dealer to ,?/iv you a ilemonstralion. Or mail 
the coupon for complete, descriptive folder. 



FREE BOOKLET— MAIL COUPON NOW 




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n Easy to let up. Unpack the RCA 
^^ ■■4()0" projector, and set it up in 
less than 2 minutes. Actual tests show 
this machine can be unpacked and set 
up. with lilm threaded and picture on 
screen, in one minute. 42 seconds. 




PV Easy to pock up. Alter a showing, 
"^ pack up the RCA "400" projector 

lick time. Slip reel arms and cord 
nto place, close up the case, and carry 

", in less than three minutes. Cut 




designed handle and rounded confers 
of case help make it eslra<asy to carry 
the RCA "41X)" proicstor. 



VISUAL PRODUCTS 

RADIO CORPORATION of AMERICA 

£MGIM£€RIMG RRODUCTS Of RARTMf M7. CAMOtM. M.J. 

In Canada. RCA VICTOR Company l.m.lail. Monf*«ol 



I Visual Producis. Pept 

I Radio Corporation of America. Camden. N J 

I Please send me. without obligation, your n 

I free booklet "RCA '400' SrnioranJJunutr lf>, 

1 Sound Film Projeciors." 

1 






I Cily- 

I 

I 

I 



M .M B 1 1( ; . \ U 1. 1 M t 1 






^s 



Medical Pictures 
by Audio 



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^HE DOCTOR" i ,h,.r ."■P'"'""* " 

YOU'RE THE^lourh""'"-'''' 



Tbc =>'i'*'^^L„vc5t'"^" 



JELFOAM IN SUKCERY;' ,_,, „„ 

The pr""=H.l" "' ^1°"'' ^'°"'"'' 



.,„E MEmCAl. "OT.ON_PICTU^^-^,^^^ 
.J'^A'uI hln^ro,^ ho» .o msVc one. 



25 >">»■ 



20 W'^ 







^^^ -ul? PRO?,."'^' , (tM OF ,s roin» 



.R FOB A'*nr^'''>S" 



• Uf^ 



eOl^S 



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20 W'"*- 




■SUTURES SINCE LISTER" 



^0 mini 
l'"J'y and ,„<)„; 
1 of sulure manu- 



^"'5' f NTISEPTICS- 

^''^" i-x-ninmnr. . "*" (""cctivcness of tt. ^^ mins. 

•■ Pre-operatrv-T ■'^ femicides 

••"vc antiscpsij- 



■'Sh^;-'-''-o.=.^°°mi.,.. 

^- ' '°' Use in ), 









" min. 
'5 mini 
" mins 
21 mios 
. 20 mins 




"nun,,, ,„ ,. ^o mins. 









^°- 







Send for 
A FEW FACTS ABOUT Al DIO ' 



AUDIO PRODUCTIONS, IN 

PRODUCERS OF MOTION PICTURES 

630 NINTH AVENUE • FILM CENTER lUTLDlNG • NEW YORK, nI 



DIKING 1952. rough calculations by the 
Editors of Business Screen established 
that the weekly attendance by Americans 
in all walks of life, young and old. at sponsored 
film showings approximated 20 million i>toplf. 
This Distribution Report gives detailed factual 
reports of 73 large and small users of films last 
year and on the activities in 1952 of six repre- 
sentative commercial distributors of such films 
for industry. We have verified T.HOO.OOO of that 
weekly audience during 1952. not including sus- 
taining television and theatrical showings. 

This report covers a total of 2A()() individual 
titles now in current use; since it is reliably 
established that there are more than 5.000 spon- 
sored films in fairly widespread use in the I . >• 
today, the predicted 20 million weekly attendance 
is a modest estimate. Well over 1.500 new films 
were reported by 126 producing companies in 
the Third Annual Production Review of BlsiNESs 
Screen, published February. 1953. 

Includes Companies and Trade Groups 

This highly-specialized and purposely limited 
-ampling of sponsor distribution experienc-e in- 
rluded such prominent companies as .\etna. 
Ford. General Motors. Caterpillar. Deere. Har- 
vester. Aluminum Company of America. Inited 
States Steel. Westinghouse. Swift. Squibb. Shell 
Oil. Socony-Vacuum. Sperry. Lumbermens Mu- 
tual. Inited. and American .Airlines. 

Also included were such diverse trade groups 
as the National Association of Manufacturers. 
American Potash Institute. National Tuberculosis 
Association. Wine Advisory Board. Western Pine 
Association and the American and National 
Leagues of Professional Baseball Clubs. 

Less extensive film users such as the DoAll 
Company. Pacific Supply Corp.. J. M. Hoober. 
Detroit Edison (local showings only). New Hol- 
land Machines Co., etc., were included to give a 
fair sampling of typical distribution activity. 
Many "one title" programs are reported and 
some programs reported as many as 50 titles in 
widespread, daily use. comprising thousands of 
prints in active circulation last year. 

U. S. and state government agencies and bu- 
reaus are included in this sampling, with par- 
ticular attention to such large activities as the 
Bureau of Mines in the Department of Interior 
and the Motion Picture Service of the U. S. De- 
partment of .Agriculture. 

Reported Audience TotaU 381 Million 

These 73 direct samplings from industry, trade 
groups, foundations and government agencies 
Totaled 1.572 titles serving 214.80;5.960 persons 
last year, exclusive of television. In addition, six 
representative ( and leading! commercial dis- 
tributors with a total of 5.34 titles in use delivered 
K)6.27l>.380 attendance. Among the commercial 
distributors reporting to BisiNESS Screen were 
Association Films. Ideal Pictures Corporation. 
The Farm Film Foundation, The Jam Hand\ 
Organization. Modern Talking Picture Service. 
Inc., and I nitcd World Films. Four of these 
companies reported their sponsored prints in use 
totaled ■U).6!{0 last year. 

Three key factors interested the Editors in re- 
viewing these reports. The first of these is the 
average attendance [kt showing. This figure 



B¥Si: 



N 



Sponsored Film Dislriliiilion 

A Natioiiiil Siirvtv of Aiulitiici- Results. Channels. Print Aclivily and MellioiU 



lluctuates wildly in the tabulations but the ex- 
perience of the more stable distributors clearly 
indicates that the national average is now slif;htl) 
less than 100 persons at each sliowin^. Programs 
aimed at assembly hall showings will increase 
the average: others targeted at specific groups 
of prospective buyers may accomplish their ob- 
jtclive with as few as 25 or 50 persons. 

Faster Print Movement Key Factor 

The second important factor is even more diffi- 
cult to establish. This concerns the denominator 
of print movement per month. How many times 
per month can each print in the sponsor's library 
reach new audiences? Since this figure is easily 
diluted by inactive older films in the sponsor's 
library, the final column in the tabulated surveys 
on pag^s 3o and 39 is a rough comparative. 
But it is an important consideration and every 
sponsor should strive to increase this degree of 
activity which amortizes the film production and 
print cost investment. 

Anything less than 2 bookings per month per 
print is well under the desirable average: com- 
mercial distributors are working toward the goal 
of 4 bookings per month per print in their care. 
Decentralized libraries of films more closely re- 
lated to centers of population is one obvious 
answer to this rapid turnover of prints. Time 
lost in transit via express or parcel post for long 
distances wastes valuable showing opportunities. 

.\udience Demand Must Be Satisfied 

Large sponsors of film programs are reporting 
tremendous audience demand in the first months 
of 1953. Inless the most efficient handling fa- 
cilities are maintained for quick turnover, these 
bookings must be post-dated many months in 
advance. When such companies must book too 
far in advance or turn down booking requests, 
company public relations may actually be un- 
favorabh influenced by disappointed groups. 

The third factor of importance is the character 
of the 16nun audience. Sponsored films are the 




invited guests of these audience groups. '1 hey 
meet, on highly favorable ground, the receptive 
minds of their viewers. The audience has proven 
faithful in reporting its size and the degree of 
its interest in such films. Commercial distribu- 
tors such as Modern I further certify the size and 
nature of the I6mm audience by a highly useful 
form, the .\dvance Booking Notice. 

More and more adult groups are being reached 
to offset the early preponderance of school audi- 
ences ( formerlv the largest group of owners of 
16mm sound projection equipment I. Out of 
10.071 audiences reached for a motor car manu- 
facturer, for example. Modern was able to reach 
8.030 adult audiences including men's groups, in- 
dustrial plants, churches, etc. 

Sustaining Television Use of Films 

Figures on sustaining television use of spon- 
sored films were requested separately from these 
companies, where they were able to report any 
degree of activity. A dozen companies out o.' 
about 50 industrial sponsors had considerabl;- 
success. Showing reports read like this: 

"75 stations used films, some stations several 
times." 

■"10 prints of one subject cleared for television 
were used 75 limes with an estimated 10.000.000 
attendance." 

"One picture shown 95 times for total audience 
of 3.380.801." 

"19 titles with 20 to 30 prints available of each 
cleared subject brought estimated attendance of 
3.000,000." 

"11 titles were shown 302 times to estimated 
50.000.000 attendance." 

"12 prints booked 47 times to estimated 1,000.- 
IXK) attendance." 

"28 showings for 5.5(U.5I6 audience." 

TV a Plus, Helps Amortize Costs 
Television attendance could l>e calculated from 
such audience size ratings on stations as Pi use 
or the station's own rate card estimates, based 
on time of showing. But television is a "plus" 
and not a basic permanent factor unless the 
sponsor buys a definite segment of local or net- 
work time. Nevertheless it is a very desirable 
plus for national sponsors and it quickly helps to 
amortize cost of public interest films. If thiy 
are of a highly institutional character, they are 
more likely to get television bookings. 

Television's daily operating schedules often 
leave time gaps which program directors have 
been haupv to fill with interesting, useful spon- 
sored shorts. Here again, commercial distribu- 
tors arc performing an invaluable service for 

iCONTlMED <1N the following PACKS I 



N I MBEK 2 • \ O I. I M K II • 1953 



BUSINESS SCREEN SURVEY ()l iy.-,2 FILM DISTRIBUTION ACTIMTY 



Sponsoring Agenvy 




^0.0|Sh0H^S 

or llookings 


Aver. 
Attend. 


^o.oj 

Titles 


Apriculliiral Iinpleniriil C 


o's: 








Company 


No. 1 


9,733.2(»4 


42.327 


230 


37 


('onipany 


No. 2 


1,800,000 


1.2<I0 


125 


6 


Company 


No. 3 


152,323 


I.I2() 


130 


10 


Aircraft Mann 


facturers: 










Company 


No. 1 


Ty.sy."^ 


200 


309 


4 


Company 


No. 2 


11.758 


362 


40 


1 


Appliance Mannfactnrer; 


9,737.900 


106.550 


«8 


52 


Associations, Fonndations, 


Etc. 








Gronp No 


1 


15.000,000 


75,000 


200 


18 


Group No 


2 


227.603 


4.925 


.50 


3 


Gronp No 


2A* 


214,787 


2.338 


91 


3 


Group No 


3 


31,776 


725 


75 


2 


Group No 


4 


3,600 


12 


150 


1 


Group No 


5 


141,783 


867 


163 


2 


Group No 


6 


500,000 






3 


Group No 


7 


281,100 






2 


Group No 


8 


7,200 


90 


75 


1 


Group No 


9 


47.827 


283 


169 


1 


Group No 


10 


433,513 


7.746 


50 


8 


Gronp No 


11 


20.000 


500 


40 


1 


Group No. 


12 


11,283,432 


16.416 


78 


1 


Group No 


13 


187,950 


2,820 


35 


1 


Group No 


14 


11.650 


233 


50 


1 


Group No. 


15 


2,031,171 


22,035 


92 


1 


Group No. 


16 


26,100 


522 


50 


3 


Automobile Manufacturers 










Company 


Vo. 1 


9.884.193 


128,471 


77 


23 


Company 


\o. 2 


12,000,000 


207.000 


58 


51 


Banking & Finance Co. 


47,883 






2 



Chemical Company: 

Container Manufacturers: 
Company No. 1 



8,550 
2,928,212 



Company No. 2 

Food & Food Products: 

Company No. 1 35,000 

Company No. 2 116,922 

Company No. 3 2,275 

Comiiany No. 4 10,648,201 

Company No. 5 1,107,627 

Government Agencies (Federal) : 

Agency No. 1 13,198.186 

Agency No. 2 276,164 

Agency No. 3 13,758,412 

Government Agencies (State Groups) : 

Bureau No. I 41.000,000' 

Bureau No. 2 125,468 

Bureau l\o. 3 10,500 

Bureau No. 4 53,237 

Insurance Companies: 
Company No. 1 
Company No. 2 



2,364,854 
2,266,689 



12,000 



105 
31,852 



700 

204 

91 

76,337 

20,098 



213.045 

11,772 

195,794 



30.000 

1,328 

140 

628 



30.192 
4,253 



50 
150 

25 
1,39 

55 

62 
25 
70 



.50 
95 



85 



3 
1 
1 

24 
9 



62 
38 

202 

452 

3 

3 

18 

21 
2 



AV..„/ 



98 ea 
15 ca 



20-700 

30 

34T 

60 

7 

35 

950T 

221T 

6 

18 

478T 

6 

150 

42 

5 

173 

14 

6,001T 
7,450T 

54T 

50/200 

9 

215 

15 

6 

6 

2,393 

75T 

6.200T 

1,820T 

13,680T 



1/100 
HOT 

5 
1/3 

77 
779T 



I'M Per 
Month 



..59 
.63 



10 ea .42 

60 ea 2.6 



4.57 
5.72 

.5 

.14 
1.03 



1.25 
1.3 
1.35 
6.9 
9.12 
5.59 
3.89 
10.61 
1.03 

1.78 
2.32 



.97 
4.11 

1.3 

2.83 

1.28 

2.48 

2.86 

.54 

1.19 



.45 




TRENDS IN DISTRIBUTION: 

(CONTINLED FROM THE PRECEDING PACE) 

sponsors by maintaining readily available print 
supplies close to station operations where many 
last-minute filler opportunities can be handled 
advantageously. The cost of such t.v. bookings 
is only slightly higher than regular 16nnn serv- 
ices. 

A Humber of basic operating factors came to 
light during the survey analysis. It appears to 
be a general, accepted practice (for example) for 
16min audiences to pay return transportation 
charges. 

Very few sponsors take advantage of tie-in 
literature opportunities which some companies 
have demonstrated with great success. Armour 
and General Mills are among those sponsors who 
have successfully delivered recipe material, etc., 
to film viewers. More companies should look 
into this opportunity. 

Audience Figures .\re Indispensible 
The decentralization of company film distribu- 
tion by depositing prints in school film libraries 
appears to be an inexpensive method of picking 
up regular circulation without transportation ex- 
pense. The difficulty here is that most school 
and extension libraries do not report the audi- 
ences they serve nor do they feel any responsi- 
bility to the sponsor for such information, even 
if they got these facts from their regional or 
local audiences. 

Prints in use without audience data to account 
for their existence and cost soon tend to be re- 
garded as dispensible items on the company 
budget. On the other hand, the easily obtainable 
audience reports, tie-in promotion, good com- 
pany public relations mail from these audiences, 
and dealer arrangements all help to justify both 
production and distribution budgets. The me- 
dium has now achieved a distribution potential 
that is vast and accountable; anything less than 
measured achievement undersells and dilutes a 
powerful medium. 

The words "booking" and "showing" need to 
be defined. Since many groups "book" a film 
and then arrange multiple showings while it is in 
their possession, the term "booking" actually 
under-estimates the vastly greater immber of 
audiences which films are actually getting. Com- 
mercial distributors are paid only for bookings, 
for the most part, but their experience indicates 
from 1^/2 to 2 times the number of showings as 
their total reported bookings. 

More .Audiences for the Same Money 
Budgets were not made a part of this survey 
but they will be examined in subsequent studies. 
An interesting comparative is noted in the ex- 
perience of one national sponsor whose regular 



BUSINESS SCREEN M.^OAZINE 



apprupriations (or »poiuorrd iJuiribuliun via a 
riiriiiiirri'ial "iirlMurk" ha\r lirrii SHXt.lNNt an 
iiualU. Snrral traro ago llial ouiii rnalilril thii 
«|>oii'>or lo rrarh 2,<NIII.(tl)(l p<Ti>oii!i: la*! >rar in 
.itr^ of lO.IKKMMK) wrrr rrat Iml for tlir uiiu- 
Imnir t'o»l. 

Ilir comiiirrcial diitlribuliun ralp i» averaging 
"2.75 (or booking. Tbc n-ononiy of ihin rharjir 
I- illu.ilratrd in such auilirnm a» ihr ll.tNlll 
»orkrr» in one Midwnl pluni rrailird in a »inglr 
^J.75 booking. Taking into an ount ibr prnnil 
ncragr of 1(KI person* prr rrjiortrd booking, the 
. o«l is alHiut 2''ii' prr |>cr»on. Morr ttian a fen 
•punMim arr having a piravani tinir ilivicling that 
low ('o»i into the 2<l or 2.S niinuir M-gnirnls of 
liiMc taken by their (ihiiii on the •srem. ITie ex- 
lrrnirl> low "tost [>rr minute" lentU to make tile 
him the leant expensive of all nmlia. 

In summary, there are several kind* of spon- 
'"•reil film programs tthich may be ronsiderrd 
■typical" of industry's efforts: 

Film Type AfTeets .Vudienre Total 

1. The terhnical process or product him such 
.i> those offered by tool or machine com|Hinirs 
Mhiih obviously have a limited audience, do their 
job vshen they reach their kind of |ieople and do 
Mot account for any large lotaU, nor do they 
I ost very much. 

2. The consumer product, »crvice. or public 
relations films which are aimed at national audi- 
■ •me groups. They are made to interest large 
x-gmenls of the |M>pulation anil today they have 

1 lietter chance than ever liefore in history lo 
M-ach those people through 16fnm audiences. 
iheatres an<l on television- 

.<- The industrial relations film, aimed pri- 
>iiaril> at internal employee audieiice<> but <dlrn 

j-eful for outside public relations as well. 

I. file health, welfare, and safety films s|>on- 
••-reil by insurance compani(*«, automotive C4>n- 

■rns, trade groufis. etc., in the "public intercut." 
nl.viously of widespreail interest. Iirnefiting both 
•)Hin»ors and the public, these films |,erforni the 
highest kimi of service to the community and 
iheir s|Minsors. They are generally able to achieve 
widespread circulation, providing pr<i)ier han- 
• lling methiMis are employed to make them reail- 

K accewible lo their (xilential au<lience«. 
rhe distribution channels for these films are 

■ ar and wide. Tmlais 2II.IIIIIMNII) weekly audi- 
rM e is bul a small fragineni of the future jMilen- 

:i4l. Taking into account Uilh theatrical and 
lelevision outlets, it has already adtatterd liryond 
the lUMIINMNMI weekly mark. 

\iidience Facts Justify Film (U>»l 

Hut It take* strict adherence to the rules and 
l>> Miund measurement practices lo justify the 
kind of professional priHiuction whi<-h will sal- 
•fv these audiencrm Having juslifieil the highest 
I i.ilil\ of filnis by the |H>lential auilience avail- 
.•Me, industry can onlv maintain the comfietilive 
|n>silion of the film medium bv the most careful 
.mil thorough analysis of lite people it aclually 
'• .iche». 

rhe mo«l commendatile factor on which lo 

■ se this overview is the knowletfge that dis- 
ibulors are now using the most inodrrn n|iiip 
•-nt and melhoals (or audieixe data analtsi* and 

fur the accurate reporting of hiMikings i„ ihov 
firms ami traite groufn whom ihev fxyr. |f 



in .>l^l..^.^ .M.Ul.l.N .>IK\1,'> ol I'r.J III.M Dl.'siniUl HON Ai.ll\ll\ 



Sitonuifiiat Agmnt^ 
Maiiii(di'turing Companies: 
(iompany -Nu. I 
<\>iiipaiiy Nu. 2 
l^iiiipany No. rt 
(!oiiipaiiy No. t 
(^•iiipaiiy No. ."> 
Ooiiipaiiy No. (i 
l^iiiipaiiy No. 7 

Mi-I.il Kabricalors: 
tompany No. I 
t^impany No. 2 

(Ifiice Ki|iiipiiient Mfr-.: 
Company .No. I 
('ompany No. 2 

Personal Products: 
('oinpaiiy No. I 
Coiiipuny No. 2 

Petroleum Industry: 

Company No. I i local I 
Company No. 2 
(Ujuipany No. .1 
Oiinpany No. I 

Pliarniaceutical Mfr*. : 
(Ompany !Nu. I 
Oinipany .No. 2 iProfi 
I'ompany No. 2 il-ayi 

Kiibber Manufacturer: 

Traii-porlulioii < ioiiipjiiii— : 

(^•iiipaiiy .No. I 

Company .No. 2 

CUinipany .No. 3 

Company .No. 4 

Company No. S 

Company No. h 

Company No. 7 

i^inipany No. K 

(Uimpany No. '» 

I'lilily Companies: 
(Ompany .No. 1 
Company No. 2 

total Sourer* Kr porting: 73 



Tula/ 


No o/>A«i.. 


Iter. 
Allntd. 


No../ 
TuU, 


.V..O/ 
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3 


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I.MNI 


20 


2 


♦l« 


l.ll 


I.Vl.tMNI 


I.INNI 


l.^t 


1 


541 


1.67 


b,l)h<l 


2112 


30 


1 


19 


.88 


H..'i.'>tl.lNNI 


77J2WI 


no 


20 


10 7-.n 




l,l.-||.«l.V» 


l<),»7K 


70 


10 


.'lO 2'.o 




3.1.) N Ml 


I..S4NI 


31 


- 


t, 


4.16 


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23.'»7I 


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3 


171 


4.2 


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1 


20 


4.16 


l,34MI 


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10 


2 


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26.1311 


K..-> 


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1 


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2.5 


12.1 1 3..-. U. 


H7.W><t 


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8..i<NMHN) 


I2I.<NNI 


70 


21 


2I3T 


1.9 


l,.>.'>0.'»27 


1 1 .333 


I.3H 


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23 


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(lO 


17 


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\.m\ 


33 


17 


2.V ea 




2 1.'..Vk3 













I.B43 »7 



.77 



3'«I.IHl7 


2..'>.'»o 


107 


1 


IINI 


2.13 


XV)>I. I.">7 


Mi.t7«i 


7"» 


28 


l.tlNiT 


3.96 


2.'. 1.071 


1.620 


l.Vl 


3 


HT 


1.03 


K.INNI 


172 


45 


1 


20 


.71 


3"»3,'».1«i 


5.8.VI 




3 






(■<i3.07l 


.-..7tH 


1.3.-. 


4 


52 


2.28 


l,OKIi,72'» 


I3.INNI 


H3 


18 


I.IMNIT 


I.IW 


l.ilKINNI 


(I.INMI 


75 


10* • 


1 6<> 




.3.2MUNNI 






S 


im 1.5(1 




3,<NMI 


(■0 


.50 


1 


<l 


2J 


i(i,lV» 


616 


72 


29 


1 2ea 





Total 19.i2 \iidience l<e|M>rlr<l: 21 l.80K,96U |HTMins 



. . . Jndrr thottinut Jon'l tout hifh 
tml ikry Mp lo get tkotr tairt mulu. 



Or ttmr film cam m*H ik im ia m di .<: 
cofljumeri m Wge aiirmUift hkr iktt 



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Birth of a Film 



Fr 



om an Ohio Bell 



(asti.vg a Part are (I In rl Hoh U illiams. It illis I'rall. H. L. 
I anderford (A.T.&T. jUin production manager) and lite pro- 
ducer's represenlatire, F. C. W ood oj Sound Masters, Inc. 



A WORD OF EDITORIAL ACKNOWLEDGMENT 
We are indebled to the Editors of The Ohio Bell Magazine for 
this behind-the-scenes story of a typical A.T.&T. training film 
production. The story is told exactly as it was brought to Bell 
employees in that publication. 



The Ca.mera Pans I.n and a customer contact begins. The scene will reflect top treatment of oi'er- 
Ivnes in this Bell System training film, which originated at the Ohio Bell Telephone Co. 




idea to a Bell System 
training film 



SHADES of Hollywood! The familiar words 
"lights, camera, action" split the air and 
another Bell System training film got un- 
der way at Cleveland's Fairmount Test Center. It 
was a queer sight for most: huge camera dollies 
standing by to lumber across the room, power 
cables trailing along the floor, sound equipment 
and booms swinging into action, and the lights 
— mostly the lights, the thousand-watt variety, 
that heated the small room to an almost unbear- 
able temperature. 

Ves. this was the professional treatment. The 
cast was made up of regular Ohio Bell people 
uho worked side-by-side with New York actors 
and actresses. The technicians — producer, direc- 
tor, cameramen, electricians, make-up man. etc.. 
were for the most part, associated with the New 
\ork motion picture firm. Sound Masters. Inc. 
The advisors were the Ohio Bell people who con- 
ceived the idea for the film and their counter- 
parts in the operation and engineering (0 & Ej 
department of the A. T. & T. Company. This 
ivaining film is being produced for plant depart- 
ments all over the Bell System and shows the 
value of overtones in the rendering of good tele- 
phone service. Plans call for a showing to all 
testboardmen and repair clerks now on the job 
and to the trainees of the future. 



How the Film Idea Was Initiated 

About four years ago our plant training people 
were going along with their jobs — checking in- 
to new methods of doing the repair job and 
evaluating the old. Things were going along 
smoothly — the indices were at a high level but 
scattered observation of repair clerks and test- 
boardmen indicated need for some improvement, 
some refinement in these important customer 
contacts. Ever on the lookout for ways to im- 
prove the service aspect of the job, the training 
people, with the knowledge and cooperation of 
(he repair clerks and testboardmen. made wire 
recordings of practice contacts. The plav-backs 
revealed, most emphatically, the rough edges on 
some of our contacts. This method enabled those 
who represent the company on these telephone 
contacts to put themselves in the customers 
shoes — to criticize their own words. To ?ome it 
was a revelation. 

With these experiences to go by. the training 
jjcople rewrote the training programs putting in- 
creased emphasis on overtones of service. Re- 
cording machine drills became an established 



BtSINE.SS SCREEN M .\ G .A Z I N E 




Ohio Bell's Film suggestion reaches AJ.<^1. 
and planning and production are discussed by 
Bob Williams (left) oj O & E plant training 
and Willis H. Pratt oj public relations. 



With Ohio's Scenes completed. Edith Davis, 
senior repair service instructor, talks over N.Y. 
footage with Bob Williams, Carl Behner, super- 
I'isor of outside maintenance, and Art Galloway. 



Field Tkii' tu select suitable lucaliun fur shoot- 
ing" is made by Bob Williams. He is shown 
talking iiith Art Galloway, supervi.tor of plant 
training. Ohio Bell Telephone Co. 



practice in initial training. Contacts became 
more pleasant and service improved. 

The idea snowballed. We thought it was so 
good that other companies might be interested 
in our success with the program. It seemed a 
natural for a Bell System training film. 

We Look to A. T. & T. 

Our experiences with training on tone plus a 
recommendation that this material would make 
a worthwhile training film were detailed in a 
letter to the A. T. & T. Company, the parent 
organization of the Bell System. This organiza- 
tion is made up of telephone people from all 
over the country, most with experience in oper- 
ating companies. They serve as a centralized 
agency to help resolve System problems. They 
advise and suggest to one company on the basis 
of an experience with another company, they 
serve as an information pool, a master business 
consultant. To support and finance their opera- 
tion the operating companies pay a small per- 
centage of their income. For this payment the 
companies receive help along five major lines: 

Research and development 

Patent rights 

Financial advice and assistance 

Availability of materials 

Operating advice and assistance 
Ohio's suggestions for a training film were 
obviously channeled to the O & E group which, 
in itself, is just one of nine departments of the 
A. T. & T. set-up to aid the associated com- 
panies in the above five directions. 

The O & E Carries the Ball 

Our recommendation that the new testroom 

techniques would make a good training film was 

studied objectively by the plant training section 

(continued on the following pace) 



Camera Crew Sets Up a Long Shot of the test men. At left on the board is an actor who plays a 
role in the Bell film: the other men are regular employees in the Fairmount office. 




NUMBER 2 . \OLUME 14 




Semok Rei'air Instrlctok Edilk Davis has been 
associated ttith overtone idea from its inception 
in '48. She is demonstrating I'oice recording in 
training, using a tope recorder. 



BIRTH OF 



FILM: 



(CONTINl-ED FROM THE PRECEDING PACE) 

of the O & E. It looked good, especially in view 
of the fact that trouble reports for the System 
ranged between 15 and 20 million a year. But 
thev wanted to find out the national reaction to 
the proposal. So. with the help of A. T. & T. 
public relations people, a questionnaire was 
drafted and sent to all associated companies. 
The letter accompanying the questionnaire read 
in pari: "Attached is an outline of a proposed 
training film which is designed to portray effec- 
tive, efficient, and pleasant methods of handling 
customers" reports of troubles . . . \^ e should 
appreciate knowing whether your area would be 
interested in a film of this type . . . Estimates 
of production costs of this film should fall in 
(he neighborhood of .S45.000 to S50.000 I to be 
prorated among operating companies on the 
basis of gross operating revenues) . . . Any 
comments which \ou mav have to propose on the 
objectives or content of the film will be wel- 
comed."" We may note here that with the cost 
spread out over a large group, no one company 
would be saddled with the burden of paying the 
entire cost. 

The Critical Details of Production 
The questionnaire and the favorable response 
accorded it by the companies convinced the 
O & E group that the Ohio idea had real sub- 
stance. They analyzed the suggestions that 
poured in from North. East. South and ^S est 
and drafted a tentative script for the production. 
There was ground work to be done — lots of 
ground work. The script was turned over to 
Sound Masters. Inc. to be interpreted for tilni- 
ing. A representative of O Js E went into the 
field to select a suitable location for "shooting" 
(as it turned out. Cleveland s Fairmount office 
and one other in Brooklyn. N. \ .. were selected ) . 
The parts for the now semi-okayed script were 
cast with suitable actresses and actors. Edith 
Davis, of [he .Northeastern Area's general plant 
organization, was selected to be technical ad- 
visor for the fdm. Everything was in readiness. 
All that rcmaine<l was the task of coordinating 
the project. The pictures on these pages take \ou 
backstage for a look at the development of ihc 
idea and activities surrounding the planning and 
production of a training film. It is through an 
activity such as this that we appreciate the work 
of our training people, the people of A. T. Jl T.. 
and others whose cooperation made the film 
possible. y- 



Brass for Industry 



Titan Metal Spoii.>iors Color Film 
Sponsor: Titan Mclal Manufacturing Company 
Title: Brass Means Business. 27 min. ccdor. pro- 
duced by I nifilms. Inc. 
* With the release of it- iichc-I pripduclinn 
Brass Means Business. Titan Metal Manufai- 
luring Companj of Bellefonte. I'a . brings llii' 
dynamic story of brass manufacturing to the 
screen for the consumer. Produced by I nifilms. 
Inc.. from a script by Oevesti Granducci, this 
16mm sound and color film pictures the varied 
and intricate steps involved in the making of al- 
loys and the manufacture of mvriads of brass 
and bronze products. 

Giant Titan, the companv trademark, comes 
to life as narrator to stress the advantages of 
using the featured metal, but the real star of 
the picture is brass itself^and it gives a superb 
performance. 

Brass Means Business pictures the complex 
machinery and high level of skills required to 
produce precision-perfect brass and bronze 
Filmed on the brass mill production lines .the 
picture shows mammoth extrusion presses geared 
for half a million pounds of hydraulic pressure 
forcing metal through dies into fiery rods, skilled 
production workers presiding alertly over the 
glistening flow of parts, scenes of forging, an- 
nealing measuring, cleaning — all emphasizing 
the complexity of each dramatic process in mak- 
ing high-qualitv brass. 

I he film explains how much research goes 
into developing the right alloy to fit the specific 
need. Painstaking laboratory analysis, rigid and 
prolonged wear-testing, even design of machine 
tools for certain projects are all part of the story. 
Brass Means Business has an original musical 
score bv Robert Stringer, who also edited the 



fi m. !n(|uiries concerning use of Brass Means 
Business, which runs 27 minutes, should be 
made lo: Film Department, Titan Metal Manu- 
facturing Co.. Bellefonte, Pennsylvania. Q' 



Film Production in New York 

•¥ As a corollarv lo Business Screen's rep<»rt 
on the extent of the sponsored motion picture 
induslrv in the Third Annual Production Review 
last month, here are some figures obtained from 
an article. "Movie Making in New York."" pub- 
lished in the February issue of the New York 
Stale Department of Labor"s news magazine, In- 
1)1 STRIAL BlLLETIN. 

According (o the Industrial Bulletin: "About 
■iOII firms are engaged in the production, service 
and distribution branches of the motion picture 
industrv in New York State, and they employ 
approximatelv 11.000 workers: this ranks a re- 
spectable second lo California"s 5M> companies 
and 25.000 employees. Only about U.OOO per- 
sons are employed in the industry throughout 
the rest of the Lnited States."" 

The article goes on to say thai about 25'< of 
professional shooting stock is now used by New 
York producers. Records of the Labor Depart- 
ments Division of Employment show that the 
number of firms primarily engaged in motion 
picture production in New York State, including 
theatrical. TV. newsreel and educational, is 130. 
and the) employ 4.500 persons. This does not 
include firms whose operations are "within" the 
industry, such as laboratories, sound recording 
studios and other auxiliary services: nor does 
it include small outfits employing less than four 
people, which do not show up on the Labor De- 
partment"s statistics. It is estimated that there 
are 170 such small firms currently in the film 
production business, though this number fluctu- 
ates widelv. and is composed in part of single in- 
dividuals "whose total resources consist of little 
bevond a desk, a telephone and a prayer." ^ 



Tilun MelaW jamitiar Irudeniirii "Giant Titan" is lighleil jor production oj "Brass Means Business.' 




BUSINESS SCREEN M A G A Z I .\ E 



Document from Life 

Israel Means Hope and New Skill^ 
Sponsor; The Women? League for Israel 
Title: The Hi^h Tower. 25 min. b/«. |iro- 
duced by Dynamic Films. Inc. 

■¥■ The Women's League for Israel is a charit- 
able organization that operates school for girls 
in Israel. In the past 20 years it has graduated 
32.000 girls into useful jobs in a land that has 
need of every talent it can find. 

The Hiiih Toner tells this story by showing 
an episode involving three new girls arriving 
at the school for the first time. They have come 
to Israel from Iran. Egypt and Germany, and 
each has individual problems to be adjusted. 
Principally, the story centers around Rachel, 
who, since leaving Germany, had lost twelve 
years of her life on Cyprus before "coming 
home " to Israel. 

Rachel's difficulty in adjusting to a need to 
live again is finally solved and she goes on to 
become a teacher. Other girls learn weaving. 




Moder 



school scene in "//fjuA Toner 



bookbinding, cooking and other skills that are 
needed in Israel. 

The High Toner has been a tremendous suc- 
cess on television, playing over 200 dates thus 
far. Outstanding qualities: a superb narration: 
well interpolated scenes made from drawings 
of Nazi brutality obtained from the Museum 
of Modern Art. !* 



Nash Introduces New Rambler Line 

With a "Sidewalk Stopper" film 

Sponsor: Nash Motors. 

Title: Nash Rambler, 195.1. 9 min. color. Jiro- 

duced by Telefilm. Irii. 
+ A graphic presentation, with glamorous girls 
and settings, of the whole line of Nash Ramblers 
was provided by the Nash Corporation for use 
in conjunction with the nationwide introduc- 
tion of the 1953 models. 

The film and a T.S.I, continuous projector 
were provided as a package at cost to Nash 
dealers to set up both inside and outside of 
showrooms as a sidewalk stopper. Blsi.nk.ss 
Screen reviewed the film in a dealer's show- 
room and noted that everyone in or passing 
through the room gravitated toward the pro- 
jector unit. Salesmen reported that the film had 



\ O 1. 1 M K 1 ^ 



attracted quite a crowd at its continuous show- 
ing on the previous weekend evenings. 

The film features designing by Pinin Farina, 
a leading stylist, and introduces the whole line 
of cars effectively, especially for smaller dealers 
who cannot display each car in the showroom. 
From the reaction we found among dealers. 
Nash could hardly have provided a h;ttcr 
|ioint-of-purchase sales aid than this film. ^ 




Toi'S IN Travfx also is "Wings to Italy" from 
nhich this I' A A scene is taken. 

PAA's latest "Win^s" 

.Sponsor: Pan American World Airwa\s 
Title: Wings to Italy. 32 min. color, produced 

by Coleman Productions of New York. 
M Travel films of the "sun-sinks-slowly-in-the- 
West" school of scripting have been boring 
audiences almost since the first days of motion 
pictures. It is no surprise, however, to see in 
Wings to Italy a travelog with a well-articulated 
story line and believable main characters. This 
sort of travel "p'^) ' has been a feature of Pan 
American's Wings To programs for several 
years and few series of films have been more 
consistently popular. Italy, both because of its 
subject and because of the way it has been 
handled, should soon be leading the popularity 
list. 

The new film shows most of the principal 
tourist spots of the peninsula and does them 
strict justice — which is to say — they are extra- 
ordinarily beautiful. It uses the off-screen voices 
of its main characters, a voung couple just re- 
turning via PAA from Italy. The\ reminisce 
about their Italian vacation while thumbing 
through her sketchbook. Each charcoal drawing 
evokes some epi.sode from their trip. This 
method of flashback is made effective bv using 
tnatched dissolves from sketch to scene. 

The two vacationists wander about the ruins 
of ancient Rome, climb Vesuvius, walk about 
Pompeii, ogle 1 he does, anyway I the Bikini 
suits on the beach at Capri. They projwrlv ""do" 
Pisa's Tower. Siena's famed annual carnival 
and horserace. Florence, the Lakes, the Dolo- 
mites and wind up in Venice. Makes vou want 
to get right on the plane and take otT in the 
film's imaged footsteps. Q' 

OTHER FILM REPORTS ON PPS. 56, 58, 60. 64 



Steel for Defense 

U.S. Steel Shows a "Good Neighhor" 

Sponsor: United Stales Steel Corporation. 
Title: Good Neighbor. 26 min.. b/w. produced 

by The Jam Handy Organization. 
"^ Together with news and financial editors of 
Midwest dailies, news magazines and wire serv- 
ices. Business Screen' previewed this latest addi- 
tion to the motion picture library of I nited States 
Steel and its subsidiar\' companies on a ver\' 
pleasant March evening in Chicago. 

Good Neighbor reports, through the wide an- 
gle o^ the motion picture camera lens, from the 
air and via the narrated sound track of George 
Hicks, the immense construction project repre- 
sented bv the new Benjamin F. Fairless Works 
of L'. S. Steel, named in honor of Steel's Board 
Chairman. This is the largest integrated steel 
mill ever built and the 26 minutes of impressive 
documentary footage cover the building of Fair- 
less on the .3800 acre tract at Morrisville. Pa., 
from the artist's conception to the christening 
ceremonies. 

As no other medium could, the film reminded 
members of the Chicago preview audience that 
the best skills of the Gary. Indiana works 
helped to create Fairless. Good Neighbor will 
show' millions of Americans how American en- 
terprise rolls up its sleeves to meet the critical 
plant needs of the national defense program. 

You are there at the opening ceremonies when 
Mrs. Benjamin F. Fairless. wife of the chairman 
of the Board christens the Hazel Blast Furnace 
and when seven-year-old Nancy Fairless. grand- 
daughter of Mr. Fairless. ignites the fuse which 
lights up the Nancy furnace to begin steel mak- 
ing operations. 

Long before this climaiiit sequence. Good 
Neighbor takes its audience through the fascinat- 
ing detail of engineering. e.\cavation. and other 
phases of this big-scale building job. 

Companv public relations executives super- 
vised this dramatic film record, through all con- 
struction and comnmnity phases, while crews of 
The Jam Handv Organization capably executed 
the sizeable production assignment. S' 

First Steel Pours jrom the open hearth into 
200-ton ladle at C. S. SteeTs new Fairless Works, 
pictured in "Good Neighhor." 



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Northwest Empire jg^ 




FEW If .\ny Motion Pictures tiiiii out just 
the «ay they are planned. Even with the 
rather flexible type of script that we ordi- 
narily employ, when the chips were down, we 
would not have been able to follow it very close- 
Iv. So when it was decided that we were to pro- 
duce a picture on the Pacific Northwest — the 
states of Oregon and Washington — we decided 
to do it without a script. 

Doing the picture sans script did not mean 
that we started shooting without planning. The 
over-all idea or '"theme" for this picture had been 
stirring slowly in the mind of the producer for 
several years. We had quite a few huddles on 
this subject from time to time and finally \^ ill- 
iam R. Moore, General Director of Public Re- 
lations for Union Pacific said with commendable 
caution: 

"Go ahead and make the picture the way you 
feel it should be done — when the work print is 
ready phone me." 

Eighteen months later I phoned Mr. Moore 
and invited him to see the first draft of \orlh- 
uesl Empire — some 3200 feet long. 

In this film were innumerable miles of train 
travel, thirty thousand miles in our station-wagon 
camera car and a few thousand by boat, plane, 
on horses and on foot. All in all we really had 
quite a time. 

During the eighteen-month period, lest it be 
construed that we worked in luxury to take so 
long on one picture, my co-worker Jack Patter- 
son and I shot and poduced several other pic- 
tures which were called for in our regular pro- 
duction schedule. 

Union Pacific's policy on motion pictures has 
always been somewhat benign. Our executives 
have felt that motion pictures could perform the 
best service for the railroad in the field of public 
relations. With some exceptions, most of our 
efforts have been directed to the production of 
films designed in a very simple way to build 
friends in the territory which we serve. We have 
emphasized the country, its people, its industry 



,1^0^^^^^^*^^ 




Eye-filling Scenery of the Pacific Northwest region, such as this vieic 
Rainier, lifts Union Pacific s "Northwest Empire" to new high in audience 



of Mt. 
appeal. 



Rolling Surf and wide expanse of sand typi- 
fies scenery along the Oregon coast. 



Mt. Hood rises majestically above Lost Lake 
as the color camera sweeps the horizon. 



Only R.^rely (and then most effectively) is the 
Union Pacific emblem carried into this film. 




I LSI NESS SCREE.N .M .\ G .\ Z I N E 



Union Pacific's Vince Hunter 
of One of the Past Year's Out 

and agriculture. The railroad tie-in has been 
definite but secondary. The result has been that 
most Union Pacific films have not had a very 
strong commercial flavor and we feel that the 
films have been more successful because of this 
policy. 

With this policy behind us we knew that 
\orlhwesl Empire was to be a factual and ac- 
curate impression of the Northwest. It was not 
to be a railroad picture but would show the part 
the railroad lakes in the area and give a little 
information about our service to Oregon and 
Washington. 

Setting Lp the Shooting Schedule 
Our first step was to make a list of available 
subject material. This covered scenic areas, 
special events, industries and special features. 
By a process of elimination we narrowed down 
this list until, with a few exceptions, we had 
only subject material with a high interest and 
particularly adapted to a visual portrayal. Then 
we were ready to start shooting. We dispensed 
with a shot list since Patterson and I would do 
all the shooting of the picture. 

If this approach to a motion picture sounds 
rather casual it might be well to state that in 
our shooting huddles as we worked on the pic- 
ture we put a lot of emphasis on ways and means 
to make the picture interesting and outstanding. 
Part of the answer lay in the fact that we took 
plenty of time for shooting. Seldom did we 
compromise by shooting when weather condi- 
tions were not good. In addition we tried hard 
for unusual angles, scenery of special beauty. 
and unusual subject material. We felt tliat wild- 
life footage of sea-birds, whales, running ante- 
lope and bird-life would raise the interest level 
of the fihn. We also shot quite a lot of footage 
from a moving car. The running shots were 
made at 64 fps and these scenes added a psuedo 
stereo quality. We hoped that our overall treat- 
ment would give us a fluid and fast-moving pic- 
ture. Since the picture obviously had to be quite 
long, tempo was going to be a most important 
factor. 

During the first summer I worked mostly alone 
at odd times. We had other pictures to make 
and Jack was tied up on another job in the 
Rocky Mountain states. 

We Make the Most of Location Time 

Conserving on time as much as possible I 
worked on the more difficult material where one 
man could do just about as much as two. 1 
managed to complete most of the air and train 
shots, some scenic and agricultural material and 
some wildlife shots which are always very time 
consuming. I also worked in some of the special 
events such as salmon fishing derbies, clam frys 
and loggers' festivals. 




Tells the Proiluclion Story 
standing (^olor Travel Films 

Spending the following winter on production 
as usual, we headed into the Northwest in the 
spring to wind up the job. Working a sun-up to 
sun-down schedule it still took us until November 
to satisfy ourselves that we had what we wanted. 

While the states of Oregon and Washington 
offer .some varied and magnificent motion picture 
material it isn't there just for the asking. You 
have to work hard for it. Overcast skies and 
rain during some months give way to a dry 
summer with considerable haze. Smoke from 
forest fires does not help any. Jack had to wait 
eight davs in Seattle for the wind to switch and 
blow the smoke from distant forest fires away 
from the city. 

Good air shots presented some problems as 
the air over the mountainous areas was prelt\ 
rough. Earlv morning was the best time to fl\ 
hut it happened that most of the air shots we 
wanted called for afternoon light. At times we 
had some pretty good aerial gymnastics around 
the mountain peaks and in the Columbia River 
Gorge. Our light plane was tossed around like a 
cork. 

Oregon Coast Scenery Is Highlight 

Probably the most difficult time we experi- 
enced was in photographing the Oregon Coast. 
This beautiful stretch of coastline was set up 
for a highlight spot in our picture and we had 
some pretty definite ideas about the material. 
Some ordinary beach shots wouldn't do. 

■Mthough the coast may provide some delight- 
ful tourist weather we found it unsuitable much 
of the summer for good photography. We made 
repeated trips, patrolling the coast all the way 
from Winchester Bay to Astoria and north into 
Washington only to find off-shore fog or a 
richer brand that enveloped everything. Excess- 
ive heat in the inland valleys was the reason 
for this rather unusual circumstance. Wliere 
there was no fog there were likewise no pictures. 
.\nd so it went. .According to the word we got 



it was always clear when we were not there. But 
we stayed with it and eventually we got what we 
wanted — or a reasonable facsimile. 

To spread ourselves over so large a territory 
with as much economy of time as possible we 
lined up our work on the basis of a sort of 
loose shooting schedule which could be varied to 
suit the whims of the weather. Fog on the coast 
drove us to the inland valleys. Haze there headed 
us for the mountains. We put a lot of miles on 
our camera car but we did save time. .An intimate 
knowledge of the country was most helpful. 

Near the Finishing Mark— 20.000 Feet 

By the time fall rolled around we had North- 
nest Empire pretty much "in the can." Better 
than twenty thousand feet of film had been care- 
fully checked through the viewer during the 
evenings after our day's .shooting was completed. 
We had mentally "cut the film" a half a dozen 
different ways. Always uppermost in our mind 
was the musical score for the picture and we 
tried to "shoot for music" as much as we could. 

The only area that still had us stumped was 
the Oregon coast. We had made over fifteen trips 
down to the coast without getting our shots. 

I came back from an Eastern swing to find 
Portland shrouded in a soft November rain. Jack 
told me that a storm had just blown in from the 
coast. But I had a hunch. 

"Let's head for Yachats," I told him. "This 
time I think we are going to get it." 

"It" was the water climax for the picture. 
We wanted some spectacular churning surf and 
cresting waves to blend with music. 

Weather Sets Up Final Barriers 
Pouring rain and mist enveloped us all the 
way to the coast. It was still raining when we 
pulled into the motel at the little village of Ya- 
chats and the only way we could tell that the 
sea was out there in the gloom was by the roar 
of the surf. That night a gale practically blew the 
shutters off of the motel. We were up at five^ — 
fog so thick you could cut it with a knife. We 
were really nervous. We were running out of time 

I lONTI.NLED ON PAGE SIXTY-EICHTI 



The Michtv Collmbia River glimpsed from Crown Point on the Oregon 
side: providing both color ami grandeur for I I's ".\orthuest Empire". 



NUMBEK 2 . \()1. l\Ii; 11 . 1933 




Progress in Stereoscopic Motion Pictures 

A Special Report by Edwin II. Land. I'roidcnl. Polaroid (iorporatioii* 



To Kktain Our Pkkspective in llic prtsiiil 
cxcilciiiPiit civer three-dimensional pictures, 
it may be useful to review the sricntific 
basis for our interest in this field and to attempt 
to answer, in the light of recent developments, 
the two questions that we and the motion picture 
industry must kee|i in mind as «c |ilan our fu- 
ture course: 

Must theatre audiences continue to wear 
Polaroid glasses in order to enjoy three- 
dimensional stereo pictures? 
Will audiences feel it worthwhile to wear 
the glasses "after the novelty is worn off.''" 

What is a Stereoseopie Picture? 
To attempt an answer to these questions, it is 
necessary first of all to draw a sharp distinction 
between the stereoscopic three-dimensional pic- 
ture and the many depth "effects" thai ha%e 
nothing to do with stereoscopic vision. 

For our purposes, we can define a stereoscopic 
picture, in non-technical terms, as one that re- 
produces the scene as an observer would see it 
iiitli both eyes if he were actually present. 

T\vo steps are required. The first is to take 
two photographs of the scene from two slightly 
different viewpoints. This step corresponds to the 
viewing of the scene by an observer with his twd 
eyes. It \ields two different views of the scene. 
identical in subject but different in fine detail 
and in perspective. The second step is the presen- 
tation of these two views to bring the left-eye- 
view to the spectator's left eye and the right-eyc- 
view- to his right eye. 

Stereoscopic pictures, so presented, conve) a 
conviction of realism that can be presented in no 
other way. 

We presented to the public in January of 1936 
the worlds first stereoscopic movie in full color 
at the New ^ ork Museum of Science & Industry. 
To the thousands who canie to the premiere, and 
the tens of thousands who follow'ed over a period 
of years, it was a stirring, unforgettable experi- 
ence. Millions responded with equal enthusiasm 
to the first commercial stereo film, shown with 
the same Polaroid system at the New York 
^ orld s Fair and later taken on tour. Here was 
realism of a kind the movies had never offered 
before. 

Tiie.se Are the Alternative Approaches 
The statement that stereoscopic movies offer 
a unique sense of realism is not to be taken as a 
disparagement of other techniques for heighten- 




ing the realism of motion pictures. Many of these 
techniques have l)een brought to a fine state of 
refinement; among others, the use of distant 
haze to enhance the illusion of depth, the use 
of exaggerated perspective in set design, the 
u.se of traveling camera to accentuate change in 
perspective and the movement of foreground ob- 
jects with respect to the background. The de- 
velopment of non-stereoscopic techniques is en- 
joying a strong revival. One of them. Cinerama, 
achieves a spectacular effect by the use of ver\ 
large screen, on which three separate flat pictures 
are projected side by side to form a continu- 
ous panoramic view. The screen itself is deepU 
curved so that members of the audience see a 
picture that occupies a large part of the normal 
visual field. 

Another system. Cinemascope, fills a wide 
screen with a single projector instead of three. 
In recording the scene, special equipment com- 
presses a wider-than-normal image into a stan- 
dard film. In projection, a corresponding de- 
vice restores the picture to its original propor- 
tions. 

In each of these techniques, unusual effects are 
obtained by filling an extra-large screen with an 
extra-large picture. In each, the picture itself is 
a "flat" picture, despite the curvature of the 
screen, in the sense that it presents the scene as 
a one-eyed man would view it. 

Such developments can be thought of as com- 
petitive with stereoscopic pictures only in the 
way that, in the automobile industry, power- 
braking is competitive with power-steering. In- 
deed, in the ultimate development of motion pic- 
tures, it seems likely that techniques of this kind 
will be combined with stereoscopic techniques. 
A Picture for Each Eye 

On this point all serious workers are unani- 
mous: To obtain the truly stereoscopic three- 
dimensional view of the scene, two pictures must 
be conveyed simultaneously to everv member of 
the audience and every member of the audience 
must see one of these pictures with his left e\e. 
the other with his right. 

For over a century, research in the field has 
been directed to achieving this conveniently. 
Hundreds of schemes have been explored. Arthur 
W. Judge, in his standard text I Stereoscopic 
Photography), describes over a dozen schemes 
in detail. 

Onh one of these has seriously attempted to 
aMiid the use of some type of viewer by each 



' The text oj litis special report 
was prepared by Mr. Land, as 
president and director of re- 
search of Polaroid, for the di- 
rectors of that company. The 
principle of Polaroid stereo- 
projection is illustrated at left. 



indiiiijiial In ihc audience. This general scheme 
is known as the parallax stereogram. Two very 
able scientists devoted a good part of their lives 
to investigating it. Mr. Frederic K. Ives and his 
son. Dr. Herbert Ives. In I'W.^ the latter summed 
up the work in an address before the Royal 
Photographic .Society with the conclusion that, 
"These and other problems are somewhat appal- 
ling to contemplate. Along with the considera- 
tion of these difliculties. it must he borne in mind 
that the resultant relief pictures will tend to be 
of poor definition in front of and behind the 
image plane, so that scenes having great natural 
depth will not be rendered very satisfactorily." 
To my knowledge, nothing has occured since 
1933 that would change this conclusion, notwith- 
standing the improvements that have taken place 
in photographic materials and screens, and the 
efforts that have been de\oted to the scheme. 

After thirty years of study, it is my own con- 
sidered opinion that it is only by a fundamental 
new discovery concerning the nature of light or 
the physiology of vision that one could hope to 
circumvent the need for individual viewing de- 
vices. 

Possible Types of Viewer 

There are three basic types of viewers. One. 
the anaglyph, accomplishes the separation of 
the two images on the basis of color. One pro- 
jected image is green, the other is red. The eye- 
pieces in the viewer are colored to correspond. 
The system cannot, of course, be used for color 
pictures. A more serious fault, however, is the 
retinal rivalry set up by the different colors for 
each eye. Its most recent commercial use, in the 
thirties, demonstrated its technical inadequacy. 
There have been no developments in filters since 
that time that Wduld noticeably improve the sys- 
tem. 

The second type is the mechanical viewer, a 
shutter device alternately covering and uncover- 
ing each eye. synchronized with alternating left- 
and right-eye pictures projected on the screen. 
The technical and commercial problems are ob-' 
vious. 

The Polaroid viewer is the third and only 
practical type. It permits the use of color pic- 
tures. It is simple and inexpensive. It preserves 
the full definition of the picture. It is easy on 
the eyes. 

It is notoriously dangerous to make a flat- 
footed pronouncement in any field of science. 
It may be significant, however, that during all 
of our years of work in this field, no qualified 
scientist has come forward with a seriously con- 
sidered proposal for showing three-dimensional 
pictures for theatre audiences by any means 
other than the simple Polaroid system that we 
introduced some twenty years ago and that is 
now being used for showing stereoscopic pic- 
tures under various producers' trade-names. 

After the Novelty Wears Off 

The attendance figures for the first feature- 
length three-dimensional pictures. Bicana Devil. 
and the Festival of Britain shorts, leave no doubt 
about the drawing power of the stereo.scopic 
technique. Our advisers in the industry recall 
that in this respect the stereoscopic technique is 
repeating the history of other important imiova- 
lions in the art, the introduction of color and tin- 
I t; O i\ T I iV U E ON I' A C E S I .\ T \ - N I N K I 



ELECrRICALiy 

,NT£RLOCKED 

DRIVE 



f'lmlng off an Ira m m 




... A lii-w aiitl iiiomc-iiUius chapter in liisl(ir\ l)ci;aii Uiti' one suminer iiii;ht in 1S96 
wlicn Henrv Ford made the trial rnn ot hi.s httli- hanilmade "(juadro-cvcle " o\er the 
cohl)k'.sti)nes of a .street in Detroit. 

The laithtnl re-enaetiiient of that historical event is one of the many true-to-lifc scenes 
uhich \!1'() has re-created in the Ford Motor Conipanv's fortheominsl .5()th .\nm'versary 

inotinn piclure. "The American lioad". 

Tliis featiire-iengtli film has l)een l)r<)u<jht to tlie screen with the faithfnl adherence to facts 
and the hrlinnhiliti/ which distinpiish all MFO productions. 



J>«I^O 



^/- 10 duct i o )i i Lhi c . 



15 EAST 53rci STREET • NEW YORK 22 • MURRAY HILL 8-7830 



.MM It 1-. ){ 



\ LI .M 1: 1 I . I ')'. 3 



SPONSOR INTEREST IN AUDIENCE RESEARCH IS GROWING 

Pre-Testin^ to Insure Film Success 

A Report on tlie Application of the Cirlin Keactograph 
for Aiidienre Reaction to a Film for Kwikset Locks 



IN THE Back of a Darkened Auditorium in 
the Ambassador Hotel in Los Angeles a few 
months ago, three people sat intently watch- 
ing a square steel case about the size of a port- 
able typewriter. 

In the box. a roll of specially treated paper was 
slowlv winding from one spool to another. And 
tiny sparks flew up as the tape passed under a 
comb of 50 needle-like styli. each sputtering from 
time to time as it burned a line in tlie sensitized 
paper. 

The three onlookers had every reason to be 
intent. They had just produced a 16 mm film on 
the rather difficult subject of powdered metal- 
lurgTi'. And the lines etched into the moving tape 
would tell them how well they had succeeded in 
putting their story across to the audience for 
which it was intended. 

For in the front of the auditorium, hand-picked 
guests from local industrial plants were watch- 
ing a preview showing. With few exceptions, 
each viewer was holding a pair of plastic handles 
wtih push-buttons embedded in the ends. By 
pressing a thumb on the green "Like" button or 
on the red "Dislike" button, he registered his 
second-by-second reactions to the film he was 
watching. Two wires carried his message to one 
of the styli which burned a solid line when it 
was activated by the green button, a broken line 
when the red button was being pushed. The ma- 
chine was the Cirlin Reactograph, a research 
tool that has helped take the guesswork out of a 
wide range of film productions, from multi- 
million dollar entertainment features to modest 
educational and commercial shorts. 
By Way of M-G-M 

The Reactograph was developed just before 
the war by Bernard D. Cirlin, then director of 



research for a New York advertising agency. It 
was an outgrowth of the Program Analyzer 
which C.B.S. president Frank Stanton and Co- 
lumbia University's Paul Lazersfeld had built to 
measure listeners' enjoyment of radio programs. 

Holds Patent on Recording Method 
The Stanton-Lazersfeld machine, in turn, was 
an adaptation of the old polygraph principle. 
The first model was a cumbersome affair, accom- 
modating only ten respondents, each of whose 
reactions were recorded by a pair of fountain 
pens. Cirlin conceived and patented the method 
of burning solid or broken lines on specially 
treated paper. 

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer brought Cirlin and his 
invention to Hollyivood shortly after the war. 
and the machine was used in pretesting a score 
of major films. Cirlin later joined Facts Con- 
solidated, a private research firm, and used the 
Reactograph in studying radio programs as well 
as independently produced feature films and 16 
mm commercial productions. 

The latter field appealed to him so much that 
Cirlin set up his own producing unit, known as 
Audience Tested Productions. The operation has 
since expanded into a full-fledged agency. Audi- 
ence Tested Advertising, Inc.. although the pro- 
ducing unit has retained its identity and is hard 
at work making industrial shorts. 

1 ses of the Reactograph 

Usefulness of the Reactograph lies in its abil- 
ity to detect a picture's weak points before they 
have done any damage and while they can still 
be repaired at minimum expense. In testing a 
picture, therefore, the machine is used in record- 
ing audience reaction to the rough-cut version. 



l.y Charles Bigclow 

and its findings are used as a guide to final 
editing. 

In fact, his machine is so useful that Cirlin 
sometimes feels obliged to emphasize that it is 
not a mechanical director or robot film editor. 
"What it does." he explains, "is show where the 
audience reacts favorably and where the audi- 
ence reacts unfavorably. It does not — except 
perhaps by implication — show why the audience 
reacts this way or what the director should do 
about it." So the machine is no substitute for 
creative talent, as some have suggested. "On the 
contrary. " Cirlin goes on, "only the creative 
director can make full use of the Reactograph's 
findings." 

To help the director interpret these findings, 
Cirlin employs two other research devices: A 
questionnaire, fiUed out by respondents after the 
showing; and informal "depth" interviews. 
Here's how these steps tied in with one another 
at the Ambassador preview last summer. . . . 

The Technique in Action 
The film was being shown for some 50 guests 
who had been thoroughly briefed on the use of 
the push-buttons and who had demonstrated 
their understanding in a trial run. And in the 
back of the hall, three people sat around the 
machine. 

One was a timer, stopwatch in hand, jotting 
the running time on a copy of the shooting script. 
Another of the trio, holding a single push-button, 
performed another timing function by pressing 
down the button during every other one of the 
film's 40 scenes. And next to this record, at the 
extreme edge of the tape, another stylus auto- 
matically marked off one-second intervals with 
a broken line. When an error of five seconds 
can completely distort the findings, such split- 
second timing is essential. 

The third watcher was Bernard Cirlin and he 
was not concerned with timing. His eyes were 
on the tape rolling out from under the sparking 
styli. From long experience, he could detect 
changes in the proportion of solid and broken 

(CONTINUED ON FOLLOWING PACE FIFTY) 



KEY SEQUENCES TESTED FOR KWIKSET FILM: 
Hi^h point in the film was this closeup of a lock plug being ejected jrom 
a dual action press. Its money-saving implications ivere readily appreciated 
by assembled plant officials. This is scene 15 in chart on Page 50. 





Above Is Low Point (A) tihich production men considered a waste of 
lime, since it failed to show the ivheels in relation to the machinery. 15% 
registered dislike on the chart. 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



NO. 2 OF A SERIES 




on Better Selling, Training, Demonstration 
through photography 

Audio-Visual methods pay off in many ways ... a few 
examples from the files of Kodak Audio-Visual Dealers 

Machine company shoots own selling movies 

"Two and a iialf years ago we purchased a Cine-Kodak Special II Camera. 
Believe me when I say it has certainly paid oJJ. We do all our field work with 
it — taking movies of our farm equipment in use. We produced two feature- 
length company films and many product shorts for our sales organiza- 
tions. Being a professional piece of equipment and yet portable makes 
the Special II outstanding." — From a prominent manujacturer oj jarm 
machinery. * 







Movies important in gas-station dealer training 

In its dealer training, this large oil-and-gasoline refiner relies heavily 
upon sound movies to explain company policies as well as the merchan- 
dising of its products and services. Ten- to fifteen-minute films carry mes- 
sages from top executives. "Sound films in color give our dealers help on 
selling. In the Rochester District, we project with Kodascope Pageant 
Sound Projectors — quiet in operation and the finest we have ever used" — 
says the District Manager oj a large refiner. ' 




Slide projectors save thousands of promotion dollars 

Recently 1 7 Kodaslide Master Model Projectors were purchased by ooe 
of the world's leading soap manufacturers for previewing new promo- 
tional pieces. Previously, branch managers were called to the home office 
and shown actual pieces which were afterwards made up in quantity. 
Then they were shipped out for branch managers to use in their terri- 
tories. Material soon became "dog-eared." Sow colored photos of each 
piece are made into slides, sent out in sets for branch managers to project 
on Kodaslide Projectors. Thousands of dollars are saved in travel, print- 
ing, and shipping expenses — reports this manujacturer.* 




BUSINESS FILMS 

. . . demonstrate, train, 
dramatize, sell 



Sales versatility achieved with table viewers 

"Our use of your Kodaslide Table Viewers has been rather broad ... in 
direct customer presentation, small-group sales meetings, local- and na- 
tional-convention exhibits, and also in editing color-slide presentations 
for large audiences. It's surprising that so much interest can be developed 
with this simple piece of equipment. The durability of the slides and the 
equipment has been well demonstrated. In fact, at one busy engineering 
convention a group of 26 slides was put through the machine about 2 50 
times." — From a southern metal products company.* 

•Name on request 

These are but a few examples of the ways in which Kodak Audio-Visual 
materials are helping business and industry to make and sell better prod- 
ucts. For the name of your nearest Kodak Audio-Visual Dealer — one of a 
coast-to-coast chain of sales-service representatives — use the coupoit below. 



EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY, Rochester 4, N. Y. 

Please s*nd me nome of nearest Kodak Audio-Visual Dealer; also complete information on rhe 
products checked: 

O 16mm. mof,'on-picfur# cameras; O 16mm. sound projector*; O miniature still cameras; 
O color slide projectors and table viewers. 



NAME_ 



COMPANY. 
STREET 

an 




NUMBER 2 . \ O L UM E 14 



49 



MERCURY 



X' 

UNCOLN 



(isso) 

ESSO-STANDARD OIL 



INTERNATIONAL NICKEL 



MEAD 

CONTINENTAL BAKING 



van praao productions 

PRODUCERS OF COMMERCUL. INDUSTRIAL AND TELEVISION FILMS 

1600 BROADWAY 

NEW YORK 19, NEW YORK 

Plaza 7'2e57'268r2688 




13 POUNDS 

if Size of portable 
typewriter 

if Keeps 'em awake 
on both sides 
of the hall 

THE PICTUREPHONE 

Sound Slide Machine 

McCLURE 

1115V2 West Washington Blvd. 
CHICAGO 7 CAnal 6-4914 



Prc-Testin^ the Film 

ICONTIMKl) |-RO\l I'M.K K O KT V ■ K I (; 1 1 T I 

linos and could visualize the cliarl lliat lalir 
would sliiiw Ihr rdin"s liigli and low points. 

I!nl .1- h,- u^ilrlied. Cirlin planted eontinually 
al Ihi- iilllc' idnilifvinf; numbers aliove the styli. 
jollinf; down notes as he did so: A reminder to 
ask #12 whN he didn't like the shot of metal 
powders heiiif. Idemlcd. a.mther to ask #:5i; win 
he Mhhlenls suilehed from ■■I.iki'" In •■Dislike" 
in the ndddl.' of the furnace scpicnc,-. 

The time reipiired at the end of the showing to 
pass out and collect the questionnaires gave ('ir- 
lin additional jiiinutes in which to study the 
tape and prepare for the personal interviews 
that eonstitmc the final phase of this integrated 
technique. 

The questionnaire asked the respondent to 
write down how he liked the film, what he liked 
most and what he liked least, any sequences that 
he had trouble in following, and any other com- 
ments that he cared to make. Although he did 
not have to sign the form, the guest was asked 
to enter the number attached to his pair of j3ush- 
liuttons. This number was the same as that of 
the stylus which his buttons activated. When it 
appeared on the questionnaire, it made possible 
a comparison of his written replies with his 
recorded reactions. 

Anatyzinu the Findings 

The film. "Precision Parts From Powdered 
Metal" I whicli Cirlin's agency had produced for 
Kwikset Locks, Inc.). was shown twice, to a total 
of about 100 persons. Although this sample-size 
may seem small in terms of most quantitative 
research, studies have shown that Reaetograph 
findings stabilize at this point and that addi- 
ticjnal testing does not materialh affect the out- 
come. 

The two Reaetograph tapes were cond)ined 
and a chart was constructed, showing the per- 
centage of the total sample registering "Like" 
and "Dislike" during each ten-second segment of 
the film's nineteen and a half minutes. A five- 
minute excerpt from the chart, containing both 
the low point and the high point of the film, is 
reproduced in these pages. 

The low point (A), at which more than IS 
per cent registered "Dislike," was a montage of 
giant wheels in the lock company's tool and die 
department. Questionnaires and personal inter- 
views de\eloped the information that production 
men thought this sequence a waste of time, since 
it failed to show the wheels in relation to the 
machinery. 

Interest returned quickly in Scene 11. wliiili 
showed metal powders being poured into a 
mixer: but the chart reports that interest tended 
to lay toward the end of this 4<i-second scene. 
And another low (B) was hit in the following 
scene, in which a laboratory technician checked 
the quality of the blend under a microscope. 

Why should interest fall off at a shot of this 
kind? Here was .something too small for an\ 
respondent to recall voluntarily on the question- 
naire. But Cirlin had seen the broken lines, 
noted the stylus numbers, and asked the dis- 
pleased respondents to explain. As it turned out. 
they felt that the narrator's background discus- 
sion of the lock company's high quality standards 



»a- I omiiicnial: tlics were Hilling t.. assume 

lliat high qnalit) was maintained and didn't n I 

a sales talk on the subject. 

Two minutes later, in Scene l.S. came tin- high 
point ol the whole film. The scene was a close- 
up of a lock plug being ejected from a dual 
acti4)n press. Seconds before, a few ounces of 
loose powder had been poured into the die. And 
now. with a rhythmic thrust, the pressed part 
emerged. For the assembled plant oflicials, who 
reaflily appreciated the money-saving implica- 
tions of the process which the lock rompan\ had 
introduced to the West Coast, this scene was 
real drama. 

Bui (Cirlin was more concerned with negative 
reaction and its causes. Besides the two low spots 
already mentioned, there were two others. One 
resulted from iiii ongruous background nmsic. 
and the olhcr frnni a montage similar to that in 
Scene 10. The chart showed, however, that the 
audience was not opposed to the montage tech- 
nique as such. Another montage sequence, show- 
ing the different kinds of part that could be 
pressed from powder, was well received because 
it was thoroughly understood. 

As this is written, "Precision Parts " is being 
carefully edited to eliminate all four low spots. 
And the revised version will be tested again be- 
fore its release, 

A Form of Insurance 

Although films produced by his subsidiary 
unit. Audience Tested Productions, have first 
claiin on the Reaetograph, Cirlin makes the serv- 
ice available to any advertiser, agency or pro- 
ducer. 

Cost lor a complete test of a 20 or 25-niinute 
film ranges from .$500 to $1,000, while an 80- 
minute feature film might cost S3,000 to study. 
(In both cases, length is that contemplated for 
the finai print: rough-cut versions vary but al- 
ways run considerably longer. I 

In any event, the cost is a relatively small per- 
centage of the total production budget. Sf 

Chart shows audience reactions as recorded by 
two Reaetograph tapes and registering belli 
"Likes' and "Dislikes" during each 10-second 
segment oj the test film. 




BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



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Sarra's New "Pageant on Film" 
Explains Modern Color-Living 

♦ The full impact of color upon 
every phase of today's living is de- 
picted in the film Color Comes of 
Age, which received its premiere 
showing before the annual conven- 
tion of the Painting and Decorating 
Contractors of America in Chicago 
during March. 

The 45-minute color-pageanton- 
film was produced by Sarra, Inc. 
for the Martin-Senour Paint Com- 
pany, which will make the film 
available to interested groups as its 
contribution to better understand- 
ing of the importance of modern 
"color-living." 

Narrated by Milton J. Cross, the 
film pageant takes viewers on a 
crosscountry '"tour" to visit out- 
standing architects, designers, color 
physicists, magazine editors and 
other authorities — and to hear them 
give their own views on the impor- 
tance of color to today's style of 
living. 

Harold Lloyd, whose film com- 
edies have reached screen audiences 
everywhere, gives his views on the 
importance of color to motion pic- 
tures. 

Walter Dorwin Teague, who de- 
signed the principal buildings and 
exhibits for the World's Fairs of 
New York, Chicago, San Diego, San 
Francisco and Paris, discusses the 
importance of color in industrial 
design. 

Elizabeth Gordon, editor of 
House Beautiful Magazine, speaks 
on "Nature Colors"; Edith Brazwell 
Evans, editor-in-chief of Living for 
Young Homemakers, talks about 
color's effect on the "young mar- 
ried" market: and Albert Kornfeld, 
editor-in-chief of House and Garden 
Magazine, tells "how to live with 
color." 

Dorothy Liebes, called the "first 
lady of the loom," develops impor- 
tance of colors to textile design, and 
color's impact upon packaging of 
all types of consumer products is 
discussed by Walter P. Paepcke, 

Harold LtovD is one oj the featured 
players in "Color Comes of Age." (see 
above) 




mtmm m^m 



NEWS ABOUT FILMS AND PRODUCTION TECHNIQUES 



chairman of the board of the Con- 
tainer Corporation of America. 

Carl Poss. color phvsicisi: Wil- 
liam Pahlmann. designer: Richard 
V. Neulra. Los Angeles architect: 
Morton GoldshoU. Chicago design- 
er: and Jack W. Zucker. painter, 
explain the use and effect of color 
in their fields. 

The film presentation Color 
Comes of Age is the "first of its 
kind," developed to give broader 
understanding of an important 
phase of modern life, said William 
M. Stuart, president of the Martin- 
Senour Paint Company. 

Color Comes of Age was written 
by Helen A. Krupka of Sarras 



creative staff and produced by Jo- 
seph G. Betzer. director of film 
planning, and Harry W'. Lange, 
production manager, of .Sarra's Chi- 
lago studio. 



New Ethyl Film Is in Production 

♦ A iiiiition picture on valve rota- 
tors, important in the heavy-duty 
engine and tractor fields, is in pro- 
duction at Audio Productions, 
Inc. for the Ethyl Corporation. 
Herman Roessle. Audio vice 
president, is handling the picture 
which is being done almost entire- 
ly in animated drawings. Release 
date is set for Mav first. 



DE FRENES 




1909 BUTTONWOOD STREET -PHILA. 30, PA. 
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Dynamic Films Receives Plaque 
for Service to Auto Racing 

♦ Dynamic Films, Inc. is sporting 
a new plaque on the office wall "For 
Outstanding Achievement in Con- 
tributing the Most for Auto Racing" 
and awarded last month by Speed 
Ace Magazine as one of its annual 
kudos to racing's top performers. 

Though the company has a well 
rounded schedule of films for spon- 
sors in a great many industries, 
Di,-namic has been responsible for 
a great majority of recent racing 
films in the automotive field, pro- 
duced for such clients as The Cham- 
pion Spark Plug Company, the Fire- 
stone Tire and Rubber Company, 
the Pure Oil Company, Bardahl Oil 
Company, and Socony-Vacuum 
Company. 

In 1952. Dynamic covered the 
Indianapolis "500" and 17 other 
"big" car, stock and sports car 
events. A crew of eight cameramen 
and a sound unit are assigned to 
capture the events completely and 
authentically. 

Speed Age estimates that these 
racing films have been seen by ten 
million people in the last three years 
and have done much to further in- 
terest in the "sport of men."' 

Film Describes Controled Mixing 
Of Silicate Cement by Dentists 

♦ A Method oj Mixing Silicate 
Cement is an eight-minute color 
motion picture produced by the 
National Bureau of Standards and 
the Council on Dental Research of 
the -American Dental Association. 

It demonstrates a new method of 
mixing dental silicate cements in a 
closed container allowing maximum 
powder incorporation into a given 
quantity of liquid independent of 
atmospheric conditions. Differences 
in properties of the cement when 
mixed under summer and winter 
conditions show the marked effect 
of temperature and humidity. Ac- 
tual restorations in the mouth show- 
how research laboratory findings 
may be demonstrated in dental 
practice. 

The film is available on a loan 
basis or may be purchased at 
•S40.31 a print from either of the 



Plant Food Council Announces 
New Picture on Plant Growth 
♦ American Plant Food Coun- 
cil, Inc. recently announced a col- 
iir motion picture called AfaJcing 
the Most of a Miracle to be pro- 
duced by Aldio Productions, Inc. 
The film, under the direction of 
Hans Mandell, will include an 
unusual picturization of plant 
growth and photosynthesis execut- 
ed in technical animated drawings. 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



QUALIFIED SPECIALISTS IN COLOR 



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Telephone: HILLSIDE 8225 



NUMBER 2 • \OI.rMK II . 1033 



53 











W. E. Sawyer 


i 



People rail® BMfeaPicI ures 



Johnson & Johnson Promotes Two 
to Merchandising, Education Posts 

♦ bi. V,. Gkkdic. vire president of 
Johnson & Johnson, announced 
this month two promotions within 
thai rompany's Merchandising De- 
partment. This department is 
charged with the development and 
manufacture of Johnson & Johnson 
retail drug products, their promo- 
tion and advertising. 

W. E. .Sawver. Director of Edu- 
cation since 1946 when he joined 
Johnson ii Johnson, has been pro- 
moted to Director. .Merchandising 
Services. During the war. Sawyer 
served as a special agent in the 
F.B.I. Prior to that he was with the 
General Electric Company in vari- 




ous managerial capacities in adver- 
tising and sales promotion. 

M. D. ScHACKNER, former As- 
sistant Director of Education, has 
been given full responsibility for 
John.son & Johnson's extensive re- 
tail and consumer educational pro- 
grams as Director of Education. 
Schackner joined Johnson & John- 
son as a salesman in 1947. Before 
World War II. in which he served 
as a jiaratroop officer of the famed 
!-!2nd Airborne Division, he was on 
the public relations staff of a Holly- 
wdod film studio. Schackners ex- 
perience in contacting the retail 
drug trade and in public and trade 
relations work especially qualifies 
him for the position of Director uf 
Education, it was pointed out. 



Church Council Appoints New 
Film and Broadcasting Assistant 

♦ Wesley Goodman has been 
designated Assislaril Executive 
Director of the Broadcasting and 
liirn {^onnnission. National Coun- 
cil of the Churches of Christ in the 
li. .S. A. The Council is the largest 
cooperative church agency in the 
country. 

Mr. Goodman a veteran of 15 
years in religious radio and TV 
was made an administrative officer 
of the Commission in the Fall of 
1951. when he became assistant to 
the Executive director. Dr. Ronald 
Bridges. 



Management Consultant Firm 
Specializes in Film Industry 
* A management consultant firm 
specializing in the motion picture 
and TV film industries was opened 
in February by Brandt Enos. 

Mr. Enos, formerly business man- 
ager of The March of Time, re 
signed as business manager of a 
New York film studio to form the 
new company. 

Organization of Brandt Enos 
Associates resulted, Mr. Enos said, 
from the apparent need for man- 
agerial assistance on business prob- 
lems peculiar to the commercial and 
television film industries. 







112 West 89th Street 
New York 24, N. Y. 
TRofalgar 3-6221 










The Pure Oil Company 

wanted to show their 
product In action on the 
world's toughest proving 
ground. 



The Perfect Circle 
Corporation 

wanted to tell the story of 
the famous Indianapolis 
"500." 



The Champion Spark 
Plug Company 

wanted to tell a story about 
major racing events all 
over the country. 



motion pktwes 

for Television J 
and Industry / 



. they all chose 

dynamic 




Thomvs p. Marker 

Chrysler Names Film Executive 

♦ Thk Cmrim.kk Gori'dration has 
rerenlK announced the appoint- 
ment of Thomas P. Marker, for- 
mer Navy project officer and busi- 
ness executive, to the newly-created 
post of compan\ film executive 
in the Public Relations Department. 
Marker will be located at Detroit 
headquarters of the Corporation. 

Associated Film Labs Announce 
Technical Improvements in Service 

♦ Technical improvements said to 
increase the quality of 16mm color 
films have been announced recently 
by T. C. Hageman and Wilson 
Leahy, owners of Associated Film 
Laboratories. 

Sound reproduction, according to 
the announcement, has been im- 
proved by light valve recording 
from the original dub to the dupli- 
cating print stock. This eliminates 
the loss from contact printing. 
Leahy and Hageman said, and in- 
creases reproducible volume by 
about six db's with a great range 
of fidelity. 

Associated Film Laboratories say 
they have special printer shutters 
which prevent the appearance of 
negative splice on the screen. The 
use of this method in negative edit- 
ing of original scenes is said to 
permit the producer to preserve 
stock bv runi)ing any scene of the 
negative at full length. 

An electronic variable shutter 
designed and installed at Associated 
allows a range of dissolves from 15 
to 120 frames according to Hage- 
man and Leahy. They said the fa- 
cilitv is unique at Associated, and 
that up to now a 48 frame disolve 
has been the only practical length 
in most cases. 

In promising other improvements 
b\ Associated in the near future. 
Wilson Leahy said. "It remains the 
aim of Associated Film Laboratories 
to introduce methods that will as- 
sist in professionalizing the techni- 
cal quality of 16nim film making." 



BUSINESS SCREEN M A G .\ Z I N E 




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Motiuii picture liliiis arc (lie most powerful tools ever 
created for llic jiresenlatioii of ideas. Literally thousands 
of 16 iiini sound motion pictures, discussing virtually 
evcrv subject jria, are available for screening at no 
charge through libraries, associations, foundations and 
conunercial organizations. And many thousands more 
may be had for a modest rental fee or outright purchase. 
These lilms, which cost millions of dollars to produce, 
arc vours at the Hick of a switch with an Ampro pro- 
jector! Call your Amjjro audio-visual dealer for a demon- 
stration of the Ampro projector best suited to your needs. 
Leading commercial and institutional organizations all 
over the world prefer .Vmpro... Famous Tor The Finest! 



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CORI>ORATION 

(A General Precision Equipment Corftoraiion Stthiidiary) 
283S N. Western Avenue* Chicago II 




NV MBER 2 • \ (M. I \l K 11 



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Ibmm 

Color Printing 

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FOUR SEPARATE FACILITIES 
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Cue ro// printing eliminating notching of the original 
negatives. To you this means protection from handling and 
mutilation arising from the necessity of notching your original 
for light changes and dissolves. 

'^ Dissolves of any length from 15 to 120 frames. This 
feature of our service fulfills a long-felt need. Every producer 
has suffered at one time or another from the limitations imposed 
by the single-length dissolve when, in his picture, a much longer 
or shorter dissolve is indicated. 

^^ Western Electric Electronic Re-recording of all sound 
release prints. By light valve printing from 35-mm Mognostripe, 
35-mm Photographic, 17''2-mm Magnetic, or 16-mm Magnetic, 
to 16-mm Color Duplicating, a gain of approximately 6 db's in 
volume is obtained, together with an improvement in fidelity 
that is at once apparent even to the non-professional. 

Printer Equipment eliminating the appearance on the 
screen of negative splices. Automatic instantoneous shutters, 
activated by a cue roll notch, permit instant direct cuts back 
and forth from the A and B negative rolls as indicated by 
your editor. 

for Further Information Communicate with 

Associated Filivi 
Laboratories 

5631 HOLLYWOOD BLVD. • HOLLYWOOD 28, CALIFORNIA 
HILLSIDE 8195 



FROM .SCKKKN 1I)K\ TO DIKECT .SALES RESULTS 




Drive-ln The.\tres all over L. S. are showing Armours one-minute 
trailers plugi;ing company's "Star" products for direct sales. 

Armour Trailers UP Drive-In Sales 



■K This Spring. 1953. brings the 
opening of another drive-in movie 
season to operators seeking to sur- 
pass last years booming business. 

These outdoor theatres offer an 
excellent field for good sponsored 
films. Many managers have shown 
interest in commercial pictures 
for their regular programs and 
they have a special interest in 
shorts that promote sales in their 
own concessions. 

Four one-minute trailers intro- 
duced by Armour and Company 
last summer were received with so 
much enthusiasm that the Chicago 
company has prepared eight more 
for this season. They are designed 
to stimulate the viewers appetites 
during intermission not only for 
Armour Star frankfurters, but for 
other refreshments as well. Built 
around a singing commercial for- 
mat the shorts show mouth-water- 
ing scenes of people enjoying 
something to eat between features. 
Produced by Stanley Neal Produc- 
tions in Hollywood, these "short- 
ies" feature music by Bing Cros- 
by's "Starlighlers." 

Ringing That Register 
Offered at no cost to the opera- 
tors, the films alread\' have been 
shown in nearly 600 drive-ins. And 
owners around the country attest 
to the cash register-ringing ability 
of the films. 

The concession manager of a 
large Chicago drive-in noted a 
nine per cent increase in total busi- 
ness after using the trailers only a 
short time. The first night one of 



the intermission shorts was shown 
in the Dude Ranch Drive-in at 
Maryville. Missouri hot dog sales 
shot up 25 per cent. Total conces- 
sion business for the season was a 
third more than the preceding 
year. One of the big factors in the 
increase was hot dogs, making Ar- 
mour happy, and the overall 
growth in sales certainlv added to 
the theatre owner's appreciation of 
sponsored films. 

Gets Order on the Spot 
The best proof of Armour's suc- 
cess came when Charles Madden, 
general foreman of the Armour 
plant at Portland. Oregon, happen- 
ed to be in the audience at the 
Sandy Drive-in the first night one 
of his company's trailers was 
shown. During intermission he 
visited the concession stand and 
chatted briefly with the manager. 
A little while later a call came 
over the loudspeakers asking "the 
gentleman from .Armour" to please 
report to the refreshment stand. 
He did, and received an "emer- 
gency" order for 72 pounds of 
franks — an average four day sup- 
ply had run out in one night. 

The success of the Armour 
shorts from both the drive-in op- 
crators and the sponsors point of 
view should result in two things. 
The theatres should be willing if 
not anxious, to use more commer- 
cial films, and sponsors should 
take fuller advantage of the dis- 
tribution possibilities in outdoor 
audiences. S" 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 




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NIMBER 2 . VOLUME 14 



57 



Diamond State Phone Sponsors 
Film on "The Delaware Story" 
♦ The Delauare Story— first mo- 
tion picture of its kind ever to be 
made in Delaware — is now being 
distributed by the Diamond State 
Telephone Company in that stale. 
It is a 33-minute fihii in full color. 

The film, whirl] was produced by 
the DeFrenes Company of Philadel- 
phia and photographed entirely in 
Delaware, traces the history of the 
state from the first visit of Henry 
Hudson to the Delaware Bay in 
1608. through the later Dutch. 
Swedish and English settlements, to 
present-day times. 

Presenting history in an interest- 
ing, pictorial form, the film shows 
many of the world-famous buildings 
which played a prominent part in 
the early history of the United 
States. Included among the dozen or 
more churches pictured are the Old 
Swedes Church in Wilmington, one 
of the oldest in the New World, 
Christ's Church in Dover, and the 
Old Friends Meeting House in Wil- 
mington. 

The picture traces the develop- 
ment of the telephone in Delaware, 
from the first installation in 1878 
— only two years after its invention 
— through the founding of the Dia- 
mond State Telephone Company 19 
years later to the present-dav 100 
percent dial system, which links 
Delaware with the rest of the world 
in a matter of seconds. 

Delaware's industries, which have 
given the State the highest per 
capita income in the Nation, are 
also shown, with shots of many 
business firms and the state's farm- 
ing and chicken raising industries. 

The picture describes the import- 
ant part played by the telephone 
in the development of both large 
and small industry. Civil Defense, 
farming and the hundreds of other 
activities of the Diamond State. 

The film is a dramatic story of 
Delaware, told by Delawareans and 
showing hundreds of citizens going 
their many ways. 

The telephone company is making 
the film available for bookings be- 
fore clubs, schools, churches and 
other organizations throughout Del- 
aware, gp 

WiLMlNCTO.N is Delaware's fore- 
most city and chemical capital of 
the world. 




What's Mew in Easiness Pictures 

State and Miiiii(i|>al Piitiircs l-'catiircd in News 




"The Delawark Story." a new DeFrenes fitni. features this scene shotcing 
Leni Lenape Indians watching Henry Hudson sail ship into Delaivare Bay. 



GUTS CAN MEAN 
INFECTIONS 

And supposed wrongs in the minds of your 
employees, based on misunderstandings and 
lack of facts, can mean trouble. 

Stop it before it gets started ... by develop- 
ing supervisors who are alert to detect griev- 
ances . . . who have the know-how to handle 
them with an appreciation of human feel- 
ings. 

Develop tronhle-stoppiiiji supervisors nilh : 

"HANDLING GRIEVANCES" 

one of the sound slidefilms in the outstand- 
ing eight-part visual course supervisor 

TRAINING ON HUMAN RELATIONS. 

You may obtain a preview without obliga- 
tion. 

ADDRESS REQUESTS TO: 



6108 SANTA MONICA BLVD. t 



^--' 



HOLLYWOOD 38, CALIFORNIA 



Vital Problem of Water Pollution 
Presented in New York Picture 

♦ A billion gallons of polluted wat- 
ers flow daily from the homes and 
industries of New York City. A 
problem for all places where people 
live and work, for polluted waters 
are dangerous waters, this problem 
has assumed major proportions for 
the City of New York. 

To show what New York is doing 
about this situation, the City's 
WN\C Film Unit has made a new 
film for the Department of Public 
Works called The Waters .Around 
I s, 25 min., b.w. As the film pic- 
tures it. this sewage in the rivers, 
creeks and bays around the city be- 
fouls the waters, endangers the 
health of citizens who bathe in the 
Ijeach waters, creates a stench that 
wreaks financial havoc with real 
estate bordering the shorelines 
washed by that sewage. 

Dates Back Three Centuries 
The situation had begun when the 
city began in the 17th Century. And 
it continues into this centurv — an 
unending river of pollution, three 
centuries long. Remedies begun 
early in this century were largely 
ineffectual until the problem was 
tackled by the City's Department of 
Public Works in 1938. By 1951, 
seven modern sewage treatment 
plants had been designed, con- 
structed and put into operation at 
the more critical points. In addition 
to these plants which treated 40% 
of the City's sewage, eleven more 
were to be constructed to round out 
the solution to the problem that af- 
fected the entire City. This total of 
18 plants, the last of which will be 
ready by 1959, will take care of 
present and. it is to be hoped, future 
needs of the city. 

Shows Specific Operation 
The Waters .{round Us specific- 
ally takes up the case of the eighth 
plant. Owl's Head, in Brooklyn, 
which went into operation just a 
year ago. It serves an area of 22 
square miles, an area whose shore- 
line was being washed with the raw 
sewage of a population greater than 
Galveston, Sacramento, St. Paul and 
Memphis — combined. As shown in 
the film, 60,000 gallons of raw sew- 
age pours each minute into the 
plant, is screened and strained for 
floating solids. It is then processed 
in grit chambers where sand, peb- 
bles and cinders are removed. Then 
it continues to the aeration tanks 
where air is blown up from the bot- 
tom of the tanks to supply oxygen 
to the passing sewage. The oxygen 
supplies the necessary environment 
for bacteria and otiier organisms 
which destroy the organic matter of 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 




Around Cs" 



sewage. This is man's way of em- 
ploving nature's own method of self- 
purification of waters. 

The waste sludge captured by 
treatment is subjected to intensive 
bacterial decomposition in special 
concrete tanks, which results in 
combustible methane gas which sup- 
plies most of the heat, light and 
power requirements for the Owl's 
Head Plant operation. The residue 
of the bacterial decomposition is 
discharged from the digestion tanks 
into a sludge vessel which dumps it 
25 miles out at sea. 

City Film Unit Produced 
WNYC's Film Unit, which pro- 
duced this film, is a section of the 
Citv's highly-regarded municipal 
radio broadcasting set-up. It oper- 
ates on a very small budget ( in fact, 
the whole annual budget of all 
W.NYC activities is less than S400,- 
000 1 but it does more than a cred- 
itable and workmanlike job. Direc- 
tor and photographer Frank Rosa. 
Jr. cuts bills to the bone, does his 
opticals in the camera, and still 
turns out good films that are 
thoughtful, useful and have not a 
little inspired photography. 

The Waters Around Us is avail- 
able to all TV stations, educational, 
civic and technical groups, both in 
New York and elsewhere. 9 



Puerto Rico Labor Department 
Fights Migration With Film 
♦ ■•>>« York is Ji"t what it's 
cracked up to be," says the Puerto 
Rican Department of Labor in a 
new film released for showings 
throughout the island this month. 

A Friernl in Mew York shows 
Puerto Ricans that their health runs 
a grave risk in New York, that the 
housing shortage is acute and that 
jobs are hard to find for people who 
don't speak English. 

Unlovely scenes of '"Spanish Har- 
lem" illustrate that New York is not 
the land of plenty that many Puerto 
Ricans seem to think it is. The 
City's Puerto Rican population is 
now estimated to be 376,000 and 
increasing rapidly. Both New York 
and Puerto Rican officials are con- 
cerned about the northward migra- 
tion. 



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THE BUSINESS MANS 1953 GUIDE TO frOOD .\UDIO-VISU.\U EQUIPMENT 

Another big issue of Businf.ss Scrken is in the mak- Visual Friuipment Rev iew : the Business Man's Guide 
ine as we continue work n, I ih.- lirst annual Aiiill... I.. Kciuipnu-nl. I'nv i.w Thcalrc- .md Ntmc.s. 



NUMBER 2 . VOLUME 14 



59 




The Connnercial Newsreel 



NEW SPONSORED FILM PROGRAMS OF THE CURRENT PERIOD 



Bucket Fishing uilli a camera as 
Julian Gromer lenses a scene for 
"Keys t(i Ailvenlure'\ I story heloir ) 

Kiekhaefer Corporation Produces 
Film on Beautiful Florida Keys 

M The Kikkhakkf.r (;(ii!1'ohatiii\. 
manufacturers of Mtriury outlmard 
motors, shot about 25.0l>0 feet of 
film down in the southern tip of the 
United States last summer and came 
up with two pictures and enough 
footage for alternate versions of 
each. The first was award-winning 
W aler U ilrlerness I Business Screen, 
february. 19531 produced for 
Western Auto and the second was 
Keys lo Adventure, to be distributed 
through Mercury outboard motor 
dealers. 

The Keys to Adventure are the 
Florida Keys, a chain of coral 
islands off the southern tip of the 
Lnited States mainland. They are 
a semi-tropical wonderland with 
dazzling sights for the tourist and 
fishing to amaze the migratory 
sportsman. 

With a burst of colorful blue 
dolphin, silver-sided sailfish and 
sun reddened fishermen the picture 
opens at Pier 5 Miami as the 
worlds most famous charter boat 
fleet unloads. .\t the same pier is 
travel film lecturer Julian Gromer 
ready to embark on a cruise down 
to Key \^'est. His vessel, the "Reel 
I," is a jaunty little outboard cruis- 
er with provision for eating and 
sleeping. Incidentally it is powered 
by a Mercury outboard. 

On the trip down there are beau- 
tiful underwater shots as Gromer 
"bucket-fishes" with a camera. He 
tries his luck at deep sea fishing in 
the gulf stream and catches king, 
dolphin and barracuda. 

Six-hundred pound porpoises ca- 
vort whimsically for the camera at 
"Theatre of the Sea." a tourist at- 
traction in the heart of the Keys. 
For a tarpon fishing sequence Gro- 
mer accompanies the Keys guiding 
team, Jininiie and Frankie .Albright 
on a fishing expedition on the 
"flats." Sportsmen, many of whom 
previewed the film at major boat 
and outdoor shows throughout the 
country, could appreciate Mrs. .iM- 
bright's battle with a giant tarpon 
in the 75 to 100 pound class. 



An outboard showcr-lnith and 
breakfast aboard the "Red I" sug- 
gest to the audience the delights of 
outboard cruising, and Mercur\ 
outboard motors extends an under- 
standable invitation to "find the 
Ke^'s to Adventure . . . for your- 
self." 



"Peace of Mind" Describes Growth 
and Application of Insurance 

•♦t After many montli> of research 
and preparation the 24-niinute color 
film Peace of Mind is ready for 
general release to nationwide audi- 
ences by the America Fore Insur- 
.\NCE Group. 

Peace of Mind has been designed 



III meet a demand for a film outlin- 
ing briefly the world development 
cif property insurance and its appli- 
cation to every-day living. 

The film traces the insurance idea 
Irom its beginnings in Babylonia 
and China, through Far Eastern 
traders to the Port of Venice and the 
Coffee Houses of London. It then 
touches on the development of fire 
insurance in America, the earl\ 
struggles of the industry against re 
current catastrophes and the con- 
tribution insurance has made to the 
protection and growth of our nation. 
Pea^e of Mind also dramatizes the 
role played by the insurance agent 
or broker, his importance to the 
community and how he proves to be 




a "friend 
lo.ss. 

A 121/v-mi 
for general 
I iiuntrywide 
I lie producer 
lia\e the sue 
ica Fore pi 
other films. 

I)istriliuti< 
free loan ba; 
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tions. conn 
groups will 
r.S.A.. Inc.. 
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of 



nute version is planned 
release to TV stations 
by Ted Baldwin. Inc.. 
. Should Peace of Miml 
ci s^ anticipated. Amcr- 
i..s lo f.illow up »illi 

in of the new film on a 
is to ci\ ic and business 
industrial organiza- 
imnity and religious 
be handled by Movies 
729 Seventh Avenue, 



Several New Medical Films Are 
Being Made by Audio Productions 
♦ In various stages of jjroduction 
in the medical division of Audio 
Productions, Inc. are several new- 
films for the medical and allied 
professions. One of these is Oral 
Cancer, a 25-minute color film for 
the .American Cancer .Societv 
which is scheduled for a premier 
showing before 30.000 physicians 
at the annual meeting of the 
.'American .Medical Association in 
June. 

A second film. Lung Cancer, is 
expected to be released a few- 
months later. It will be the sixth 
in this continuing series which 
«as described recently in Business 
Screen as "a milestone in films' 
contribution to medicine." 

Also scheduled for early de- 
livery is a new picture for Merck 
\ Company. Inc. Earl Price, head 
of .Audio's medical division, re- 
ported other films in planning 
-lages for several areas of profes- 
-ional education, and in the field 
I public health education for dis- 
iiiliution \ia schools. .Among these 
- the series on Health Jul Living 
uhich is being scripted for Mc- 
i;raw-Hill Book Company. 

New Picture Takes Family Through 
The Canadian National Exhibition 

* A family Affnlr is a new 16mm 
sound and cidor film on the Cana- 
dian \ational Exhibition produced 
by Ixtern.^tional Productions 
Ltd., of Toronto. It is designed for 
use on television as well as for gen- 
eral distribution as a promotion 
feature on the world's largest an- 
nual exposition. 

Filmed during the 1952 Exhibi- 
tion. A Family Affair takes a moth- 
er, father, son and daughter through 
all of the varied phases — industrial 
txhibits. grandstand shows, sports, 
and the .Armed Services display 
over Lake Ontario. The 26-minute 
film is available for showing from 
the Public Relations Department of 
the Exhibition. 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 




Indian Giides' ruies and plans are 
explained by the ")'" secretary to 
a proup of younp members and 
their dads. Scene in "My Son's 
Dad" (story beiow). 

FILM CASE HISTORY 
Boys. Dads and the "\TVICA 

Sponsor: The Young Men's Chris- 
tian Association. 
Title: Wv Son's Dad. 27 niin. h «. 
produred by Hie March of Time. 
* What can you say in a half hour 
about the YMCA? Statistics? How- 
many buildings? How many boys? 
How much money it needs? Philos- 
ophy? "We at the "V believe in 
fair play, etc."? History? Organ- 
ization? .\ctivilies? 

.\ good film lecturer eould cover 
all those points, speaking at a nice 
quick clip. Phiitographers and ani- 
mators could illustrate it. too. 

Bui what would you have? The- 
-Y"? No. you couid get the statis- 
tics all in. but know really milliing 
about the "Y" at all. 

.\ Simple. EfTeelive Tale 
Noodling around with this prob- 
lem, the March of Time's Jack 
Glenn, an old Hi-Y boy. himself, 
came up with the idea of trying to 
compress the great big "^ " story 
into a simple series of incidents 
about a man and his son. 

The outline seemed attractive 
enough that (Ilcnn went on to write, 
produie and direct it. And he knew 
his subject well, for the film comes 
off. It just shows a man going to a 
meeting of the "Indian (Juides" at 
the "Y" with his son. No big crises 
develop, but in his thoughts of his 
own boyhood, in the (H-ople he talks 
to that night, the story of the "Y" 
develops by showing how the boys 
learn to help each other and de- 
\elop qualities of leadership and 
( iliziMi-liip. 

W hat Vbout Normal Lads? 
l/i Sun's Dad is not concerned 
with the rejuvenation of juvenile 
delini|uents, but rather with the boy 
who gets the least sociological at- 
tention, the average healthy, normal 
American boy, who docs not steal 
or become addicted to narcotics but 
who has endless time on his hands 



after school hours. In todays' world 
of working mothers and out-of-the- 
home activities for other members 
of the family, he lives with a sense 
of loneliness too often overlooked 
or misunderstood by the adult. 

The film is intended for use on 
television as well as theatre and 
small group showings. The require- 
ments of the TV .screen were kept 
constantly in mind in composition 
and the selection of camera angles, 
and the length 27 minutes is de- 
signed to til into a half-hour TV 
program slot. !f 



Southern Railway Shows 
High Cost of Atri.lents 
Sponsor: Southern Railway System. 
Title: The High Cost of Careless- 
ness, color, produced by the Rail- 
way with Campus Film Produc- 
tions. 
M Freight claim payments cost the 
Southern Railway System S;i.250,- 
000 last year. Small wonder that 
the railroad's new freight claim 
prevention film is called The High 
Cost of Carelessness. 

Southern Box Car #271722 is 
the star of the show. One half of 
ihe side of the car was replaced 
with wire mesh to show how con- 
tents reacted to various speeds of 
switching and coupling, safe and 
otherwise. One scene shows a staged 
sideswipe of two box cars resulting 
in a real mess of splintered lumber 
and twisted metal. 

The Southern's film shows the 
important strides that have been 
made in the improvement of the 
railroad's freight yards and freight 
handling operations. .Xutomatically- 
operaled switches and car retarders 
and intricate communications sys- 
tems contribute to safer and more 
efficient handling of cars hi yards. 
In case railroaders might think 
mistakes and carelessness are not 
too important, the film shows lines 
of heavy trucks on the highways, 
always eager to take over the rail- 
road's freight business. 

Other railroads will probably be 
borrowing the new film as they did 
its predecessor. ■( Job U orlh Do- 
ing. The Southern's visual educa- 
tion program in freight claim pre- 
vention has attracted favorable in- 
terest from other railroads and. 
particularly, from ship(K'rs advisory 
lioards. w 

Kling Opens St. Louis Office 

♦ Ki iM. Ml 0111-. ' Hii M.o. has an- 
niiunci'd the upeninj: of a St. Louis 
offiie at r.Ui Olive Street. The new 
oflice will Ih- under the direction of 
\\ll.l.l\M ^RK.llT. fi«rmerlv with 
Meldrum and Fewsmith, Inc. 



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\ O 1. 1 .ME It 



61 



¥TsE OF 35mm color slides and 
*-^ tape recordings (as a sight and 
sound combination) in producing 
effective employee films at low cost 
is paying off for a West Coast tran- 
sit firm — the Pacific Electric Rail- 
way Company in Los Angeles. 

The firm had three objectives in 
mind when it started work on its 
first production several months ago. 
according to Public Relations Di- 
rector James G. Shea. These were 
closer understanding between man- 
agement and the 5.000 employees, 
better cooperation between depart- 
ments uitbin the company, and im- 
proved public relations as the end 
result of better "team spirit." 

Now Going Into Series 

The first of the tape-slide presen- 
tations — the story of a day in the 
life of a typical motor coach opera- 
tor — has been so well received by 
the employees that an entire series 
is now under way. 

"Effectiveness was what we were 
after," Shea said. "We wanted a- 
production' that would drive home 
our message — not just entertain. 
How best to present the material 
was a major decision. Since we 
felt that a picture on a screen would 
hold the attention, but that the nar- 
rators \ oice would actually get the 
message across, we decided to use 
color slides rather than motion pic- 
ture*." 

This decision automatically cut 
costs considerably, but put a heavy 
burden on narration. Talks with 
the firm's training division — where 
magnetic tape was already in use — 
resulted in the decision to put the 
narration, music and other sounds 
on magnetic tape. 

"This soUed a number of prob- 
lems," Shea pointed out. "It provid- 

Showing Equipment used by 
PERC includes slide projector and 
tape reproducer shoivn in position 
at rear oj motor coach theatre (see 
feature article above). 





Motor Coach Theatre jor employe ■showings of the neu 
Pacific Electric Railway Company's slide-tape program, shnii ■ 
ing roll-up projection screen in background. 

Tape Tells the Story 

Los An^ele.s' Pacific Electric Railway Utilize.- 
Slide-Tape Profirani for Effective Eiiiployee Show 



Pitf the 
poor fihii 
that is 




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cd the effectiveness, since actual 
voices of the employees could be 
used. Since tape could he edited and 
and erased, we could virtually 're- 
write the sound until it was in its 
ticsl possible form. I'urthermore, 
since tape recording is nontcchni- 
cal we could handle the production 
ourselves, again cutting costs sub- 
stantially." 

Once the shooting script had 
been written, the photography was 
turned over to an accomplished 
amateur photographer in the firm's 
mechanical department, staff en- 
gineer Don Bowman, who shot the 
picture sequence on 35mm color 
film. 

Bowman accompanied one of the 
firm's drivers, shooting picture after 
picture, to show his daily, on-the- 
job routine and how the functions 
of the various divisions of the com- 
pany affected his job. 

The Finishing Touches 

Once the pictures were made in- 
to slides and arranged in sequence, 
rehearsals were held, then put on 
tape for the final release. Equip- 
ment used was a Brush "Soundmir- 
ror ' and all recordings were made 
on "Scotch" Xo. Ill plastic rec- 
ording tape. Working closely with 
the public relations staff was the 
A. F. Milliron Co., local audio- 
visual dealer. 

Once the recorded narration had 
been edited, color slides assembled, 
and duplicates made of both, the 
presentation was ready for showing. 

A standard motor coach was out- 
fitted to handle the tape recorder 
and slide projector, complete with 
blackout curtains and tiered seats. 
On pre-arranged nights this mobile 
theater is taken into the suburbs 
where the employees and their fam- 
ilies in those areas are invited to 
see the film. 

Reaction Highly Favorable 

Coffee and doughnuts served 
after each showing provide an in- 
formal atmosphere which promotes 
frank responses as to the effective- 
ness of the film. These reactions — 
in Avriting — have been highly favor- 
able." Shea said. 'So favorable that 
we're planning se\eral more of these 
effective, but inexpensive, tape-slide 
presentations." 59" 

Recorded Tapes Personalize 
Nationwide Financial Program 

♦ A stock market instructor in the 
midwest is currently giving more 
than 150 personal lectures weekl\' 
to clients in all parts of the coun- 
try without ever leaving his office, 
Robert G. Evans, president of a 
Chicago firm offering courses in 
stock market instruction, is an ad- 



62 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 




Robert G- Evans provides lessons on fin- 
ance via tape-recorded lectures. 

vocate of the spoken versus the 
written word. For years he had 
been searching for a way to per- 
sonalize a series of supplemental 
courses he offers subscribers to a 
statistical and market analysis serv- 
ice. 

Late in 1949. he began experi- 
menting by tape recording twu 
half-hour lectures a week for dis- 
tribution to students of the courses 
throughout the country. 

They contain Evans' explanation 
of stock behavior and include case 
history analogies which serve as a 
basis for the subscribers' own ap- 
plication of the course's principles. 
They do not aim at giving advice 
on what to buy or sell. 

Solves Equipment Problem 
The obvious difficulty was to find 
a suitable method of providing tape 
recorders to participating subscrib- 
ers. This problem was solved by 
Evans in 1950. when he devised a 
plan in cooperation with the Ampro 
Corporation, Chicago manufac- 
turer of tape recorders and motion 
picture projectors. 

Evans' program works like this. 
To interested clients in subscribing 
to the series, he sends an Ampro 
tape recorder, a tape explaining the 
series, and some sample lectures. 
They are invited to use the recorder 
for a month free of charge. Should 
they subscribe, he includes the re- 
corder as part of the series cost. 

Series subscribers are divided 
into groups of eight. After receiv- 
ing the tapes and hearing the lec- 
tures, they mail the tapes directly 



to others in the group. This not 
only speeds correspondence, but 
also reduces the over-all number 
of tapes needed. 

Tape Adds Personal Touch 

Evans is voluble in his praise for 
lecorded lectures as replacing the 
earlier-used written texts. Through 
tapes, he is able to present chatty, 
informal talks with the "personal" 
touch essential to a good lecture. 
He has also been able to "meet" 
manv more of his clients than 
would otherwise have been pos- 
sible. During the past year Evans 
has placed more than 100 inexpen- 
sive. 16-pound Ampro recorders in 
the hands of subscribers to his lec- 
ture series. 

Disney Film Tops Aviation 
List from Association Films 

♦ Association Films, Inc. is point- 
ing out the availability of six films 
in its four regional libraries that 
mark the 50th Anniversary of Avia- 
tion. A newly-released Walt Disney 
Technicolor film. History of Avia- 
tion tops the series, traces, in ani- 
mation, the development of avia- 
tion, starting with the home-made 
plane the Wright Brothers flew at 
Kitty Hawk in 1903. 

It covers such history-making 
events as Bleriot's flight from 
France to England, the first car- 
rier-tvpe take-off from the deck of 
a battleship, the airplane in World 
War I, long-distance flights by 
Lindberg. Post and Catty, and 
Hughes, the start of air-mail serv- 
ice, and many uses of aircraft in 
war and peace in modern times. 

Other films in the series include: 
Airlift to Berlin (how the Allied 
.\ir Forces broke the Russian 
blockade of Berlin) : Ainvays of 
the Future (Air Transport Com- 
mand's contributions to long-haul 
flight) : Air Transportation I feeder 
lines, charter lines, larger air- 
lines) ; Look to the Skies the role 
of tactical air support in modern 
war) : and Your Career in Avia- 
tion (job opportunities in avia- 
tion). 



V /A//,e 




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You should own the McGraw-Hill book 

FILMS IN BUSINESS AND INDUSTRY 

by 

HENRY CLAY GIPSON 

President of 

FILMFAX PRODUCTIONS 

Filmfax produces motion pictures and slide- 
films for all business purposes but special- 
izes (with a production background of over 
250 titles) in color filmstrlps for use in 
education. 
FILMFAX PRODUCTIONS. 10 East 43rd St., New Yoric 17, N.Y. 



GREAT MOTION PICTURES ARE PROCESSED 

EICROL FLYXX. 

hidepcudcnt Prodt/cc?; stivs: 

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and I chose Pa/Z/e'color because it gives mc LifeWke 
Color in every situation and on every set . . . and I'tiihe 
gives me ilail\ u-vermglil prucessing." 

You owe it to \ui(r next picture to see 
the /'(////('color demonstration reel to- 
day . Phone for a date : In New York it's 
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MUSIC ClfARANCE ON AtOVf CATAIOGS ARRANCfO lY OUR FIRM 



\ () I. L M K 11 



6a 




Cannon Electric Makes "Contact" 

No« K. (;. \\..IIT I'i.lur.- l<. S.iNc Elcclri.al liulu-ti\ 



Dksh'.n plays (IN imparhiiit purl in 
Cannon s ioliil fngincvrin^ ap- 
proach to needs of various indus- 
tries. 

* More than 300 engineers and 
technical instructors were guests of 
the Cannon Electric Company on 
March 5 for the premiere showing 
of the company's 30-minute sound 
and color film Contact, at the Insti- 
tute of Aeronautical Sciences. 7660 
Beverly Blvd.. Los Angeles. 

The outgrowth of an idea jointly 
conceived bv Cannon's Sales and 
Engineering Deparlments and their 
advertising agency. Hixson & Jor- 
gensen. Inc., of Los Angeles, the 
fibn was designed primarily to aid 
those in the electrical industry con- 
cerned with the selection of various 
types of connectors and plugs and 
to instruct various engineering per- 
sonnel. 

Aids Proper Selection 
Produced by the Raphael G. Wolff 
Studios, the film dramatizes this 
technical subject of selection and 
illustrates clearly and interestingly 
the basic characteristics involved 
in choosing the proper connector 
from among the many thousands 
available today. 

In clarifying the approach neces- 
sary to reach a decision in the tech- 
nical field of connector-selection, 
the movie utilizes such scenes as 
diving rocket planes, musical se- 
quences, radio and recording ap- 
paratus and television techniques — 
all operations vitally concerned with 
electric and electronic connectors. 

Builds L'se of Literature 

Included in the film are anima- 
tion scenes showing the Cannon 
Plug Guide, a publication designed 
as an accurate guide towards deter- 
mining the proper type of connector 
for any particular job. In this scene, 
viewers are shown how to use the 
guide and how to locate it in Sweet's 
Product Design File. 

Following the premiere, those in 
attendance were presented with a 
Cannon "Plug Guide" and a folder 
which carried facts outlining the 



jirficedure necessary to procure tin- 
film for future showings. 

" riic film was produced for any- 
niic working in the electrical or 
electronic industries," Croftoii 
Jones, Hixson & Jorgensen account 
executive, said. "It was made for 
those who design, engineer, make, 
install or service electrical or elec- 
tronic components. instrumenU or 
equipment. " 

Modern \^ ill Distribute 

By making the film available 
across the nation through the facil- 
ities of Modern Talking Picture 
Service Inc., Cannon hopes to solve 
one of its biggest problems — the 
problem of proper selection. 

The film and its accompanying 
guide and folder make little attempt 



to "'sell'' Cannon, specializing in the 
educational and informational aji- 
proach and emphasizing the proper 
nielhod of connector selection. 

Ill making its point, the film 
jioints out many of the important 
factors to be considered before se- 
lecting the best connector for an\ 
particular job. Covered are such 
considerations as voltage require- 
ments, number and spacing of con- 
tacts, polarization, mounting de- 
vices, disconnect systems, moisture, 
heat and flame resistance. And, par- 
ticularly, the film illustrates the use 
of a simple visual aid in selecting 
the plug best suited for a definite 
job. 

So engrossing is Contact that 
e\ en the sound technicians employed 



l¥HAT IS COLOR CORRBCTIOH??? 



If your laboratory can alter the color as- 
pect of any scene in your original and in- 
dependently treat each scene within a 
production as a separate picture, ONLY 
then have your prints undergone true 
color correction . . . 



THE STEP PRINTING EQUIPMENT 
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AlK(:li\K]- AssKMBi.v nilh its maze 
nj electrical cunneclurs shous com- 
plexity of Cannon's selection puide. 

in dubbing the sound to the film, 
technicians w ho see scores of movies 
a week, in their work, were fascin- 
ated by the thousands of other jobs 
performed by similar equipment. 

The film will be made available 
free of charge, except for transpor- 
tation costs, to all interested con- 
cerns. Cannon feels the film will re- 
sult in speedier, more economical 
and more accurate service to its con- 
sumers. »■ 

Flying Hunter Produces Picture 
For Piper Aircraft Corporation 

* L.-e \^ulff. world-famous author- 
ity on hunting and fishing, has pro- 
duced a 23-minute Technicolor film 
called Wings for the Hunter for the 
Piper Aircraft Corporation. The 
picture is a sequal to fp'ings for the 
Angler which Wulff made for Piper 
and Edo several vears ago. 

If'ings for the Hunter shows Lee 
\Vulff teaching proper hunting and 
good safety practices and the finer 
points of bird shooting to his two 
sons. Everything from hunting 
Hungarian partridge on Prince Ed- 
ward Island to some of the world's 
finest goose shooting on the west 
coast of Mexico is taken in by the 
film, with some excellent flying 
shots interspersed. 

A limited number of copies are 
available for showings from the 
sales department, Piper Aircraft 
Corporation, Lock Haven, Penn- 
sylvania. 

The Story of Reclaimed Rubber 
Is Told in Full Length Picture 

♦ llie si. TV of reclaimed rubber 
has been brought to the public in 
a full length color motion picture 
released early in March by the 
.Midwest Rlbber Reclaiming 
Company. East St. Louis, Illinois. 

Paragon Pictires. Inc. wrote 
and produced the film which is a 
dramatic presentation of how scrap 
rubber tires are transformed into 
new industrial materials. 200 tons 
of the product go out each day. B' 



BUSINESS SCREEN M A G .\ Z I N E 



Audio-Visual Trade Fare Perfect Processing Possible 



News Aloli^ tin- liliii I'roiliirlion ami l]i|lii|imfiit I. in 



"California" Receives 1952 Award 
From Freedoms Foundation Jury 

♦ Cttlijornia. fir«l in a serit-s of 
films fiuillcd "Stalfs .if Our Na- 
tion" produced by Moi u\ \M) 
Associates, received one of the 
1952 West Coast Freedoms Founda- 
tion awards. .Sponsored liy the Free- 
doms Foundation of Valley Forge. 
Pennsylvania, the awards are made 
by a jury composed of cliiet jus- 
tices of state supreme courts and 
officers of national patriotic and 
service organizations. 

The underlying theme of Calijor- 
nia is free enterprise. The iriipor- 
tance of that idea to the growtli and 
prosperity of the I niled States is 
shown through the history and de- 
velopment of California. 

The picture has been w idcly 
used in schools and colleges in 
courses which require a knowledge 
of American history. It is available 
through Moulin and Associates. 621 
South Lebanon. Los Angeles 17. 

Five Star Productions Will Make 
Theatrical Color Ad-Fllms in 3-D 

♦ F[\i. .-^ivK I'KiiDi I iiDN.-.. Inc.. 
Hollywood theatre and TV spot pro- 
ducer, has signed for exclusive ad- 
vertising use of Dunning color three- 
dimension cameras. Production will 
be in .'^.'imm color, geared to the 
12.000 theatres in the I nited States 
which now use commercial minute 
films. 

Theatres not equi])[)e<l for the new 
process will be able to use the films 
in normal projection with a single 
negative. "Single negatives also can 
be reduced to black-and-white 16mm 
for television usage." IIakkv W aynk 
McMaiian. president of Five Star 
said, "and the Dunning experts as- 
sure us that .'5-1) television, utilizing 
polaroid glasses, will be available 
before the end of the vi-ar." 

Commercials in .'^-D also can be 
reduced to 16mni color for projec- 
tion to dealer meetings and many 
in.stitutional and industrial uses ac- 
cording to MeMahan. 



William Van Praag Outlines Work 
Of Company's Experimental Unit 

♦ At the o|K-ning of his newly ex- 
panded facilities William Van 
I'lUAG. president of Van Hua.\i; 
I'UODI ITIONS. outliMe<l several im- 
proved techniques for filming TV 
commercials developed in his ex- 
perimental unit during the past 
year. 

Foremost among the processes is 
one used in the latest Lincoln-Mer- 
cury commercials which uses a new 
wide angle lens to film areas never 
before deemed practical. .\lso ac- 
cording to Van I'raag the company 
has perfected lighting techniques 
which eliminate the flatness and 
graininess of process backgrounds. 
He said these developments were in 
addition to "Fxpedited Production" 
which delivered 15 prints 45 hours 
after receiving the story boards. 



Ampro Appoints Sales Supervisor 
♦ Appointnu 111 of C. Ricil.VRl) 
.•^MlTll as regional .sales supervisor 
in the Tape Hecorder Division of 
Ampro Cokporation was an- 
nounced last month by How.UlD 
Marx, vice president and general 
sales manager. Smith will headquar- 
ter in Collingswood. New Jersey and 
coordinate sales and merchandising 
p.rograms of .\nipro distributors in 
New England. -New York and the 
mid-Atlantic states. 



Audio & Video Products Appoints 
R. D. Winston as Sales Manager 
♦ The a|i|i.iiiiliiiciil of KoiiKUT D. 
\\ l\sTO\ as sali-s manager of tin' 
(Commercial Products Division, 
Ai Dio & ViDKo Proulcts Corpo- 
HATION has been announced by 
Kknnkth B. Bootiik. vice president 
for sales. In his new capacity, Mr, 
Winston will be primarily con- 
1 cnied with radio. TV. film, audio, 
recording and music markets for the 
company's equipment and services. 



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Empire State Prod. — "Simple operation 

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AUDIO-VISUAL EQUIPMENT FOR PRODUCTION & PROJECTION 





The "Wireless Mike" 

New "Wireless Mike" Eliminates 
Boom Mike in Film Production 

♦ A complelc miniature KM radiii 
station has Ijeeii developed by the 
Stephens Manufacturing Com- 
pany', Culver City, California and is 
being marketed by RoTHFEDER, 
YuHL & Baxter. Inc. of Beverly 
Hills to liberate film production by 
providing a ""Wireless Mike" which 
is said to eliminate need for the 
boom mike, allowing shots never be- 
fore possible with conventional 
sound pickups and simplifying 
lighting. 

Inexpensive Stereo Slide Protector 
Introduced by Revere Camera 

♦ \ transparent plastic shield for 
holding and protecting stereo slides 
has been developed and introduced 
by Revere Camera Corporation, 
in conjunction with the marketing 
of its new ""33" Stereo camera. The 
new protector, the first of its kind, 
holds stereo transparencies, gives 
good visibility, protects the picture 
from fingerprint smudges, etc., and 
can be wiped clean with a damp 
cloth or easily replaced if scratched. 



Expert Faelory Repalrt 
Lento mounted — "7"" stopped ■ 
calibrated and teited. 



New RCA Professional Projector 
Is Designed Specifically for TV 

♦ A new Kmun film |irnjcctor spe- 
cifically designed to meet the pro- 
fessional requirements of television 
stations has been announced by the 
Engineering Products Department 
of the RCA Victor Division, Radio 
Corporation of America. 

The new Type TP-6A projector 
has been newly engineered from 
base to reels in order to incorporate 
improvements resulting from RCA 
research into means of improving 
the broadcast quality of filmed TV 
programs. 

These improvements include a 
new f/1.5 lens, framing system, and 
dual focus arrangement that con- 
tributes to picture quality, and a 
new broadcast-quality amplifier, the 
company reported. Large 4000-foot 
reels with compensation take-up, a 
2-3 claw intermittent operating in 
oil, and an automatic lamp change- 
over combine, RCA stated, to pro- 
vide maximum operating conveni- 
ence and "on-with-the-show" reli- 
ability. 

The new projector will be used in 
TV studios to project images from 
16mm motion picture sound fihn 
into the film camera of a television 
system, as well as to provide for 
accompanying sound reproduction. 



National Carbon Adds New Lamp 
To Its Line of "Suprex" Carbons 

♦ The National Carbon Company 
recently announced a new "Sup- 
rex" positive projector carbon for 




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the film and TV needs of llie universe. 
A complete line of 35mm and 16mm 
Cameras, Movlolos, Dollies and accessories. 

MITCHELL • BELL S HOWELL • MAURER • AURICOH 

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lighting S, Editing equipn 
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use specitiially m all mirror type 
variable feed ratio lamps. 

.'\t 42-.50 amperes the Tmiii 
""Suprex" positive carbon gives 
more light at the same carbon con- 
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reports, it will give the same light 
at less current and lower carbon 
consumption than its predecessor. 



•■•>• 




FRANK C. ZUCKER 

(Jflni€Rfl €c^uipm€nT (o. 

1600 BROflDUJflH HflU yORK CITy 



Edge Numbering Machine 

Need for Film Edge Numbering 
Met by New S.O.S. Machine 

* Widespread use of films in tele- 
vision and more recently the use of 
multiple films in 3-dimensional mo- 
tion pictures makes film edge num- 
bering almost mandatory. To fill 
this need S.O.S. Cinema Supply 
Corp. has placed on the market the 
S.O.S. Visible Edge Film Number- 
ing Machine, for both 16mm and 
35mm film. 

Various units of this device are 
mounted on a cast aluminum base. 
The film movement is non-intermit- 
tent. Numbering is effected by an 
automatically operated metal num- 
bering block which prints the foot- 
age number on the film at each 
revolution of the sprocket. The film 
subsequently passes over a series of 
drying rollers and elevators before 
being rewound. A bristle brush and 
felt pad are fitted to keep the num- 
bering block clean. 

The central lubricating point is 
provided for all working parts of 
the main mechanism. Film capacity 
of the machine is 2000 ft. and the 
printing speed is 50 ft. per minute. 
The 16nnn model prints between the 
perforations only but the 35mm 
model can be supplied to print be- 
tween the perforations or on the 
outside edge. 

Standard numbering block is for 
6 figures either with 2 handset and 
4 automatic figure wheels, or 3 
handset and 3 automatic. Botli 
negative and positive films can be 
numbered. Supply coupling is by a 
special plug, suitable to take flexible 
lulling, and a built-in switch is pro- 
vided. The finish is bright black 
i-namel and polished chromium 
plate. 




The Busch Cine 
New Continuous Rear Projector Has 
800 Fl. Power Driven Magazine 

♦ Cinksm.esman i, til,- name of a 
new l)pc of continuous, self-con- 
tained, rear 16mm sound motion 
picture projector. A recent develop- 
ment of the Busch Film and Equip- 
ment Company, Saginaw, Michigan, 
the '"Cinesalesman" offers a depar- 
ture from continuous procedures. 

Noteworthy among the new fea- 
tures of the projector is the 800 ft. 
capacity, power-driven continuous 
film magazine which slides into the 
projector mechanism and operates 
without exerting film tension on 
either the take-up from the projec- 
tor or the feed to the projector. The 
continuous film magazine is of low 
cost, making it feasible when a 
change in film subject is desired, to 
buy a replacement magazine and 
with film in place slide the maga- 
zine into the projector. 

Two '"Cinesalesman" models are 
available, one for continuous rear 
projection only and one model that 
can be used in three ways, namely 
as a conventional 16 mm sound 
projector using a regular screen, or 
the self-contained translucent TV 
simulated 91 square inch screen, or 
as a continuous projector with the 
picture projected onto either a regu- 
lar screen or onto the self-contained 
screen. 

As in all Busch continuous rear 
projectors the basic picture project- 
ing mechanism and sound reproduc- 
ing system is identical to the mech- 
anisms incorporated by the DeVry 
Corporation in its DeVrylite "5," 
single case 16 mm portable sound 
projector. The projector weighs 36 
pounds and measures 12" wide, 14" 
high and 22" long. Write direct to 
Busch Film & Equipment Company, 
27 Jarvis-Yawkey Court, Saginaw, 
Michigan, for details. 



COLORSLIDE AND FILMSTRIP 
DUPLICATING 

FRANK A. HOLMES 

7619 Sunset Boulevatnl 
Los Angeles 46, Californii 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



Development of Dual-Purpose Projection Screens 
Promises to Eliminate Need for Room Darkening 



•♦c Development of a series of revo- 
lutionary dual-purpose projection 
screens for third-dimensional 
movies or "daylight" showings in 
classrooms or homes has been an- 
nounced by the Glometer Corpora- 
tion, Buffalo, N. Y. firm. 

Built-in controls virtually guar- 
antee theatre-goers at third-dimen- 
sional movies perfect vision '"from 
any seat in the house." according 
to Agis I. Mihalakis, Glowmeter 
president. 

"While one new M a gni glow- 
screen is designed to eliminate dead 
spots in theatres where the third- 
dimensional movie may become 
fuzzy or fade," he said, "another 
does away with the need for room 
darkening procedures in class- 
rooms ... or industrial conference 
rooms wherever movies are shmvn." 
(Ed. Note: the italics are ours.) 

No Interference From Light 

The latter, which does dual duty 
for either 3-D or flat projections, is 
not affected by ambient light com- 
ing through windows, from electric 
lights or other sources, the Buffalo 
manufacturer pointed out. 

A durable laminated "sandwich" 
made of Monsanto Chemical Com- 
pany's Ultron vinyl and Vuepak 
acetate, the Magniglow screen is 
the approximate thickness of a con- 
ventional screen. The units were 
demonstrated recently to stock- 
holders, press representatives and 
other leading citizens of Buffalo by 
Glowmeter officials. Five major ad- 
vantages were claimed for the 
screen. 

1. Uniform brilliance over any 
specified field of vision. 

2. Maximum return of light en- 
ergy to all designated area of vi- 
sion. 

3. Dual-purpose in its ability to 
serve for both 3-D or color-stereo 
and flat projections. 

4. Maximum color fidelity. 

5. A tailor-made versatility to 
meet the precise needs of any pro- 
jectionist or audience. 

Radiant Will Distribute 
Other screens designed for the 
photographic supply stores and for 



SPECIAL OPTICAL EFFECTS 
AND TITLES 

On the "Fireside Theatre" TV Series 
by 

RAY MERCER & COMPANY 

4241 Normal Ave. • Hollywood 2T, Colli. 

Send lor Free Optical Effects Chart 



audio-visual use will be produced 
as soon as possible later this year 
for distribution by the Radiant 
Manufacturing Corporation of Chi- 
cago. Later. Glometer plans a 
fourth model for the outdoor thea- 
tre scheduling 3-D films. 

Adapted to Mass Production 

Glownieter's process for the Ul- 
tron-Vuepak combination is cov- 
ered bv patent application. The 
manufacturing process has been 
adapted to mass production at a 
cost that will make the new screens 
competitive with conventional 
screens, company officials said. 

In preparing for development of 
the screen for classroom, home and 
industrial use. Curtin investigated 
the needs of a number of schools 
between Los Angeles and San 
Frnacisco where intense sunlight 
hampered movie showings during 
school hours. 

"Room darkening methods such 
as heavy drapes not only were ex- 
pensive." Curtain said, "but also 
were only partially effective. The 
Magniglow screen for daylight 
showings is designed to overcome 
this problem. In effect, it ignores 
the ambient light coming from out- 
side the area of vision of the class- 
room and reflects the undiluted im- 
age to students within the specified 
observation range." 

Handles Like Present Fabrics 
Similarly, he claimed that the 
screen would show equal results in 
a home or conference room with all 
house lights on and curtains un- 
drawn. Another advantage reported 
bv Curtin was the control of the 
range of vision vertically as well as 
laterally. "The Magniglow screen 
does not waste any of the energy of 
the projection by reflecting it above 
the heads of the audience." he said. 
Conventional in everything but 
performance, the Magniglow screen 
looks like its ordinary counterpart, 
and rolls up for packing or storage. 
Glometer Corporation was form- 
ed to produce automotive instru- 
mentation equipment and provide 
engineering service. The Daylight 
Magniglow .Screen is a direct out- 
growth of the firm's experiments 
with a safety device for reflecting 
speedometer readings on the wind- 
shield at an angle visible only to 
the driver. A tiny screen for the 
windshield that would register the 
speed in daylight was required. In 
developing this device, the Magni- 
slciw screcTi was created. W 




PRINTING 

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& Filmstrip Services. Radio Transcriptions 
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NUMBER 2 . V L U .M E 14 



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GORDON ENTERPRISES 

5362 N. CAHUENGA • NORTH HOLLYWOOD. CAL. 



Northwest Empire 



ICONTIMKU IKOM PAGE FORTY-FIVE I 

— winter was almost upon us. \^e had to get 
this stuff and soon. 

About seven lhirt\ the fog thinned a little and 
soon a ray of sun shot out. Inside of a few 
minutes we were rolling south headed for our 
first shots. Ragged masses of fog were scudding 
across the sky before a stiff wind but the air 
was clean and sharp. 

That old .saying that anticipation is greater 
than realization didn't hold good today. Both 
Jack and 1 had built up this sequence .so high 
in our imagination that by all the rules of logic 
we should have missed a mile in transferring 
our imaginings to film. But the Pacific came 
through in great style for us. It had been coy 
long enough. Now wind, tide and all the forces 
that can conspire with this great ocean came to 
our rescue. I had never before seen such a magni- 
ficent show of wind-whipped, beaten, boiling 
surf. Great white streamers that looked like thev 
had been beaten like a milk shake writhed and 
twisted and broke; then shot up like a living 
thing. The wind whipped the cream-colored 
froth off the crests sending it tumbling in weird 
design. We were pushing film through the cam- 
eras as rapidly as we could. Much of the stuff 
we shot over-speed to slow down the amazing 
action. 

Meeting Nature More Tlian Halfway 

Finally Jack observed a place at the end of a 
cove where we could photograph giant waves 
coming full into the camera. 1 thought it was a 
good idea as he hurriedly sketched it yelling at 
the top of his lungs against the roar of wind 
and surf. 

"Okay! Okay." I yelled back. "Sounds good 
but what happens to us and the camera after 
the «ave breaks. I had been watching the spot 
and had seen some waves break almost thirty 
feet in the air. 

Jack grinned "'you know what you always 
say — nuts to the risk — lets get the picture!" 

He had me there. We struggled over the 
rocks and got into the notch at the end of the 
cove. A monstrous wave broke over the rock. 
You could actually feel the ground vibrate. As 
soon as it subsided we .slipped and slid out onto 
the rock hurriedly setting up the heavy tripod 
with the camera on it. \^Tiile I struggled to level 
the head Jack was standing back to the ocean 
to keep the spray off of the lens while he focused 
it and set the diaphragm. We were working 
frantically to get ready for the next big comber 
but we didn't quite make it. 

Our Big Try for a Great Scene 
With a roar like Niagara a big white wave 
hurtled into the rock, shot in a rising white crest 
into the sky and then fell — on us. Several tons — 
or so it felt — descending abruptly can give out 
quite a mauling. Jack and 1 hung onto each other 
and the camera. The only thing that kept us from 
being knocked flat was the tripod over which, 
when the wave subsided, we were draped like a 
couple of wet garments on a clothesline. We 
finally crawled off of the rock like a couple of 



».■! pu|,>. h mis iiTtainU no >|Fnt lo g.-t caught 
ill a second time. 

But the wetting did not Ixither us much and 
«r kept on shooting until almost dark. Then 
with our film supply almost exhausted and our- 
selves in not much better condition we piled our 
sodden bodies into the station wagon and 
headed for warmth and comfort. We felt that 
we had finally finished Norlhuesl Empire and 
we had a strong hunch that the finish was 
going to be a little out of the ordinary. And so 
il turned out. 

Team-Work on the Finisiiiiig Stages 
Iti Hollywood we put in the usual time in 
iditiiig. writing, scoring and recording. Here 
we have a small group of [leople who have work- 
ed together on the production phases of Union 
Pacific motion pictures for nearly fifteen years. 
Having worked together for so long we have de- 
veloped a team-work system that gives maximum 
freedom and good results. 

Since we were not locked down to any particu- 
lar treatment Hal Rice worked out several edi- 
torial ideas and we cho.se the one we liked best. 
The picture jelled pretty well much as we had 
figured it out as we shot it. Edward Paul, musical 
director, gave the fihn a ver\ effective musical 
score with particular emphasis on the opening 
and close of the picture. An interesting combi- 
nation of reverberated voices together with a 
large orchestra and an original score set the stage 
for the opening of the picture and takes over 
for the finale which is made up of an interesting 
blend of water-action and music in a manner not 
ordinarily found in industrial film production. 
In order to take advantage of the full force and 
effectiveness of the music the commentator is 
dropped about two minutes from the conclusion 
of the film. Tlie spirit of the northwest country 
is captured in the title backgrounds by Phvllis 
Tanner. Hollywood commercial art designer. 
George Brandt wrote the commentarx and the 
commentator was Gayne Whitman. 

"Northwest Empire" in 3 Versions 
We had hoped to come out with a picture of 
approximately thirty minutes screen time. How- 
ever, to do justice to the subject we were forced 
to extend the picture to thirty-nine minutes. A 
short version of the picture will be produced 
later as well as a twelve and a half minute tele- 
vision subject in black and white. ^ 



SALES MGRSJ. 



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— CXPERIENCE since' 19U 



Background on 3-D 

(CONTINUED FROM PAGE FORTY-SIX) 

introduction of sound. On its first appearance, 
each of these innovations set impressive box 
office records. 

By analogy we might expect the stereoscopic 
picture technique to go through a similar cycle 
of development: For a time the technique alone 
will attract the crowds: we might then expect a 
great number of three-dimensional films to be 
produced in haste and rushed to the theatres in 
an effort to exploit the first public surge of en- 
thusiasm. Because of the deficiencies of these 
hastily-produced films, we might then predict a 
flagging of public interest, a reaction of the 
industry against the stereoscopic technique as a 
consequence, and a period of relative inactivity 
in the field, followed in time by a steady and 
constructive growlh as the more far-sighted pro- 
ducers perfect the medium and incorporate it 
into the art. 

Reaction & Rebuilding May Follow 

Stereoscopic pictures may go through all nf 
these stages. Already the rush is on to get pic- 
tures before the public. There is good reason to 
hope, however, that the technique may not have 
to go through the stage of reaction and re-build- 
ing. Leaders in the industry are apparently mak- 
ing every effort to see that their first stereoscopic 
pictures are good entertainment as well as good 
examples of the stereoscopic technique. Many 
have summed up their attitude in abnost the 
identical words. ''There is no substitute for a 
good show.'" 

There is also good reason to believe that they 
are equally determined to make their pictures 
comfortable to look at. The human eye is exceed- 
ingly adaptable. It was often affronted, however, 
in the early days of the motion picture, until 
the artists and technicians of the industry search- 
ed out the ground-rules for comfortable viewing. 
Conventional movies are now easy on the eyes 
because they are made to be comfortable, never 
exceeding the now well-explored tolerances of 
the eye. Stereoscopic pictures can be equally 
comfortable. Shoot the picture correctly, pro- 
ject it correctly, and it will be comfortable for 
the audience. The Polaroid viewing spectacles 
are completely "neulrar' in this respect. They 
add nothing, sulttiact nothing, so far as visual 
comfort goes. 
Polaroid's IVext Contributions Are ReWewed 

Assuming, as it now appears, that the industry 
will apply their best artistic resources to the 
technique, we in turn ha\e several basic contri- 
butions to make: 

1. We can be of special service to the industry 
in setting forth the technical ground rules re- 
quired for effective and comfortable stereoscopic 
photography for theatre-sized screen.^. This can 
save the time and effort that might otherwise be 
spent in repeating research that wc anil nlhers 
have already completed. 

2. As the source of polarizing materials, we 
have a further opportunity in connection with 
the filters and viewers. We are preparing to meet 
the huge quantity demands of the whole industry 

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69 



A NATIONAL DIRECTORY OF VISUAL EDUCATION DEALERS 



EASTERN STATES 

• CONNECTICUT • 

Rockwell Film & Projection 
Service, 182 High St.. Hartford 5. 



• DISTRICT OF COLUMBU • 

Jam Handy Organization. Inc.. 

1730 H Street. Washington 6. 
The Film Center, 915 12th St. 
N.W., Washington. 



• MARYLAND • 

Howard E. Thompson, Box 204, 
Mt. Airy. 

• MASSACHUSETTS • 

Cinema, Inc., 234 Clarendon St.. 
Boston 16. 



• NEW HAMPSHIRE • 
A. H. Rice Co., Inc., 78 West Ce 
tral Street. Manchester. 



• NEW JERSEY • 
Slidecraft Co., 142 Morris Ave., 
Mountain Lakes, N. J. 

• NEW YORK • 

Association Films, Inc., 35 West 
45th Street, New York 19. 

Buchan Pictures, 79 Allen St.. 
Buffalo. 

Charles J. Giegerich, 42-20 Kis- 
sena Blvd., Flushing. 

Comprehensive Service Co., 245 

W. 55th St., New York 19. 

Crawford & Immig, Inc., 265 W. 

14th St., New York City 11. 

The Jam Handy Organization, 
Inc., 1775 Broadway, New York. 

Ken Killian Sd. & Vis. Pdts. 
P. O. Box 364 Hempstead. N. Y. 

Mogull, Film and Camera Com- 
pany, 112-114 W. 4Sth St., New 
York 19. 

S. O. S. Cinema Supply Corp., 

bU2 W. 52nd St., New York 19. 

Specialized Sound Products Co., 

551 Fifth Ave.. New York 17. 

United Specialists, Inc., Pawling. 
Visual Sciences, 599BS Suffern. 

• PENNSYLVANIA • 

Jam Handy Organization. Inc., 

930 Penn Ave., Pittsburgh 22. 

J. P. Lilley & Son, 277 Boas St., 
Harrisburg. 

Lippincott Pictures, Inc.. 4729 
Ludlow St., Philadelphia 39. 



• RHODE ISLAND • 
Westcott, Slade & Balcom Co., 

95-99 Empire St.. Providence 3. 



• WEST VIRGIIVIA • 
Haley Audio-Visual Service, 

Box 703, Charleston 23. 
Pavis, Inc., 427 W. Washington St.. 

Phone 2-5311. Box 6095, Station 

A, Charleston 2. 
B. S. Simpson, 818 Virginia St., 

W.. Charleston 2. 



SOUTHERN STATES 

• ALABAMA • 
Stevens Pictures, Inc., 217 - 22nd 

St., North, Birmingham. 

• FLORIDA • 
Norman Laboratories & Studio, 

Arlington Suburb, Jacksonville. 

• GEORGIA • 

Colonial Films, 7 1 Walton St., 
N.W.. ATwood 7588, Atlanta. 

Stevens Pictures, Inc., 101 Walton 
St., N. W., Atlanta 3. 



• LOUISIANA • 

Stanley Projection Company, 

211l^ Murray St., Alexandria. 

Stevens Pictures, Inc., 1307 Tu- 
lane Ave., New Orleans. 

Stirling Visual Education Co., 

1052 Florida St., Baton Rouge. 

Delta Visual Service, Inc., 815 

Poydras St., New Orleans 13. 



• MISSISSIPPI • 
Herschel Smith Company, 119 

Roach St., Jackson 110. 

Jasper Ewing & Sons, 227 S. State 
St., Jackson 2, 



• TENNESSEE • 
Southern Visual Films, 687 

Shrine BIdg., Memphis. 

Tennessee Visual Education 
Service, 416 A. Broad St.. Nash- 
ville. 



• VIRGINIA • 

Tidewater Audio- Visual Center, 

617 W. 35th St.. Norfolk 8. Phone 
51371. 



• ARKANSAS • 
Grimm-Williams Co., 115 W. 

Sixth Street, Little Rock. 



MIDWESTERN STATES 

• ILLINOIS • 
.\mericaii Film Registry, 24 E. 

Eighth Street, Chicago 5. 

-Association Films, Inc., 79 East 

Adams St.. Chicago 3. 
.\tlas Film Corporation, 1111 

South Boulevard, Oak Park. 

Jam Handy Organization, Inc., 

230 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago 1. 

Midwest Visual Equipment Co., 

3518 Devon Ave., Chicago 45. 
Swank Motion Pictures, 614 N. 

Skinker Blvd., St. Louis 5, Mo. 

• I]>fDIANA • 

Burke's Motion Picture Co., 434 

Lincoln Way West, South Bend 5. 

• IOWA • 

Pratt Sound Films, Inc., 720 3rd 

Ave., S.E., Cedar Rapids, Iowa. 



• KANSAS-MISSOURI • 

Erker Bros. Optical Co., 610 

Olive St., St. Louis 1. 

Swank Motion Pictures, 614 N. 
Skinker Blvd., St. Louis 5. 



• MICHIGAN • 
Fugleman Visual Education 

Service, 4754-56 Woodward Ave., 
Detroit 1. 

Jam Handv Organization, Inc., 

2821 E. Grand Blvd., Detroit 11. 

Capital Film Service, 224 Abbott 
Road, East Lansing, Michigan. 



• OHIO • 
Ralph V. Haile & Associates, 

215 Walnut St., Cincinnati. 

Academy Film Service Inc., 2112 
Payne Ave., Cleveland 14. 

Fryan Film Service, 1310 E. 12th 
St., Cleveland 14. 

Sunray Films, Inc., 2108 Payne 
Ave., Cleveland 14. 

Jam Handy Organization, Inc., 

310 Talbott Building, Dayton 2. 

Twyman Films Inc., 400 West 
First Street. Dayton. 

M. H. Martin Company, 1118 
Lincoln Way E.. Massillon. 



• WISCONSIN • 

R. H. Flath Company, 2410 N. 3d 
St.. Milwaukee 12. 



WESTERN STATES 

• CALIFORNIA • 

James Baron, P.O. Box 291, 
Phone Mu. 3331, Los Angeles. 

Donald J. Clausonthue, 1829 N. 
Craig Ave., Altadena. 

Coast Visual Education Co., 5620 
Hollyivood Blvd., Hollywood 28. 

Hollywood Camera Exchange, 
1600 N. Cahuenga Blvd., Holly- 
wood 28. 

Jam Handy Organization. Inc., 
5746 Sunset Boulevard. Holly- 
wood 28. 

Ralke Company, 829 S. Flower St., 
Los Angeles 17. 

Spindler & Sauppe, 2201 Beverly 
Blvd., Los Angeles 4. 

Association Films, Inc., 351 Turk | 
St., San Francisco 2. 

C. R. Skinner Manufacturing 
Co., 239 Grant Ave., San Fran- 
cisco 8. 

Westcoast Films, 350 Battery St., 
San Francisco 11. 

• COLORADO • 

Dale Deane's Home Movie Sales 
Agency, 28 E. Ninth Ave., Den- 
ver 3. 

• OKLAHOMA • 

H. O. Davis, 522 N. Broadway, 
Oklahoma City 2. 

• OREGON • 

Moore's Motion Picture Service, 

33 N. \V. 9th Ave., Portland 
9, Oregon. 

• TEXAS • 

.Association Films, Inc., 1915 Live 

Oak St., Dallas 1. 
George H. MitcheU Co., 712 N. 

Haskell, Dallas 1. 
Capitol Photo Supplies, 2428 

Guadalupe St., Phone 8-5717, 

Austin. 

• UTAH • 

Deseret Book Company, 44 E. So. 

Temple St., Salt Lake City 10. 



CANADA - FOREIGN 

.4udio-Visual Supply Company, 

Toronto General Trusts Building, 
^'innipeg, Man. 
Distribuidora Filmica Venezo- 
lana De 16MM.. S.A.. Apartado 
706 Caracas. Venezuela, S.A. 



USE THIS DIRECTORY TO LOCATE THE BEST IN EQUIPMENT, FILMS AND PROJECTION SERVICE 



70 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



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and applies our protective coating. RAPIDTREAT for new film: 
Our coating protects the emulsion side of the film against scratches. 

Among our hundreds of clients are: Eastman Kodak Co., Ansco, E. [. 
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21 WEST 46lh STREET • NEW YORK 36, N. Y. 



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"CALIFORNIA" 

First in a series of one-reel color 
and sound 16mm films for motion 
picture, school room, and televi- 
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Write for Information to 

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TYPE TITLES 

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Knight Studio 

1 59 E. Chicago Ave. Chicago 1 1 



BACKGROUND ON 3-D: 

^CONTINUED FROM PACE SIXTY-NIXEI 

for viewers both in the United States and abroad. 
We will keep improving the design of the viewer 
so that it will be even more acceptable to audi- 
ences, keeping it, at the same time, so inexpensive 
that every patron can continue to be given a per- 
fectly fresh viewer for each performance. If 
there is sufficient demand, we can provide per- 
sonal glass viewers for those who can afford 
them. 

.■}. We can make an even geater contribution 
to the success of the new medium by making 
available, for release prints. Vectograph motion 
picture film which carries the necessary left- and 
right-eye images on one and the same film. 

The Limitations of Linked Projectors 
The system currently used in Buana Devil and 
other pictures requires the linking together of 
the two projectors, already existing in the theatre 
projection booth, for the simultaneous projection 
of two separate films. The industry is success- 
fully handling tlie mechanical problems involved. 
The task nevertheless places a considerable bur- 
den on exhibitors, not only for the initial equip- 
ment but also for assuring correct projection of 
the pictures. Because both existing projectors are 
used simultaneously, the picture must be inter- 
rupted occasionally for the insertion of new 
reels. 

The Vectograph Motion Picture Film 

Our Vectograph film, when it is made avail- 
able, will eliminate all these annoyances. A 
single film of standard dimensions carries both 
of the images required. A single standard pro- 
jector, without any change, projects the film. The 
images themselves are polarizing images, so that 
no separate polarizing filters are necessary. No 
special equipment, accessories, linkages or other 
special arrangements are necessary in the pro- 
jection booth. The projectionist need not be 
aware that he is showing a stereoscopic picture. 

Vectograph will be made in color or black and 
white, and in both cases the system has the high- 
est possible optical efficiency, making full use of 
all light theoretically available. 

Aside from its obvious economic advantages, 
one of the most important results of this simpli- 
fication may be to release the full creative ener- 
gies of the motion picture industry from preoc- 
cupation with the mechanical aspects of stereo- 
scopic pictures so they can be concentrated on 
the mastery of the artistic aspects. 

Hero is the great challenge and the great op- 
portunity. Over the years, the motion picture 
industry has given the world a succession of 
spectacular demonstrations of the power of real- 
ism in entertainment, first, with the motion it- 
self; then with sound: then color. Now the 
talents of this same industry have, quite literally, 
a new dimension to exploit; all the space in the 
world (again, quite literally) to work in. This 
space can be thrown away, as a passing novelty. 

Or the industry can determine to use the 
space, the solid realism of the new dimension, 
as a true addition to the medium tliey have 
created. This would be our best assurance that 
people will be wearing glasses after the novelty 
has worn off; they will be enjoying themselves, 
carried away by the realism of the art. ^ 



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EDITORIAL NOTES A\D COMMKN TAIO 

Footnote on Distribution: Marathon 
Scores on Sustaining Television 
•♦^ The Budd Company's new film. Clear Iron. 
which was released early this year. has. in a 
manner of speaking, paid for itself in 38 days. 

On Januar\ .SO. i| was offered to television 
stations to he run on a sustaining hasis. By the 
10th of March. 10,3 stations had shown the film, 
some of them more than once, for a total of 
141 times. If this time had been bought, the 
cost would have exceeded 835.000. an aniounl 
more than the total cost of the film, including 
prints. 

This quick return of investment is only the 
beginning of the Budd Company's use of the 
film. For several years to come. Clear Iron will 
be shown to non-theatrical audiences in clubs 
and schools, on new television stations as they 
open, and in theatres. 

Production and distribution of sponsored 
"■public interest" films like Clear Iron is a spe- 
cialty of Marathon TV Newsreel. which besides 
the Budd film, has produced and distributed 
such pictures as The Guardian Angel for Sikor- 
sky .\ircraft (71 stations. 110 times played. 




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16-35n.n. BLOW-IP COLOR 

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lime value osi-r .•?2.5.(HIO I : 77ie I'ouer To FIy 
for United Aircraft (107 stations, 181 limes 
pla>ed. time value over .?30.000) ; and The 
Screen Slory for Chicopee Mills, fnc. (M sta- 
tions. <J1 times played, time value S15.983.23 1. 
Marathon's president. Konstantin Kaiser, 
says there is nothing mysterious about success- 
ful distribution of films to television stations. 
\ ou ve got to have an appropriate film — some- 
thing entertaining and in the public interest, it 
has to be planned for television use as to run- 
ning time and suitable film quality for good 
TV screening, and it has to be "non-commer- 
cial." Other than that. Marathon just sends out 
a letter describing the film and wails for the 
station requests. 

Possibly stations, from previous experience, 
feel pretty receptive to Marathon's current re- 
leases, because in the case of Clear Iron over 
half the stations now on the air requested it im- 
mediately and played it during the first three 
weeks after its release. 

Marathon keeps a careful record of the time 
and day a station plays the film and what the 
time svould cost commercially, but is leery 
about claiming any audience totals. ""We can 
startle ourselves by adding up station audience 
estimates, but we know that at best the\ are 
just guesses, and sometimes pretty rosy ones.' 
Mr. Kaiser says. Pressed for some method of 
estimating an audience consersativelv. Mara- 
thon sometimes uses a rule of thumb of 10*^ 
of the total TV sets in the station area. Tliis 
takes into account that there will be more viesv- 
ers at night than in the day time, more in single 
station areas than in locations like New York 
where seven stations compete for the viewer's 
interest, but the 10% overall figure is supposed 
to even out discrepancies reasonably well. 

Marathon sees an even bigger future in tele- 
vision film distribution as new stations begin to 
go on the air this year. Television eats up ma- 
terial so fast there is a constant demand for 
new films. Canny film sponsors who can offer 
good films and keep their names way in the 
background are filling the gap. ^' 

SMPTE's Progressive Program Helps 
Expand Wider I'se of J'isual Media 
"♦f A six-point program of expanded motion pic- 
ture and television technical services, authorized 
recently by the Society of Motion Picture and 
Television Engineers, has been announced 1)\ 
Herbert Barnett. president. 

In declaring the importance of long-range 
film and television engineering Barnett cited 
the industry's thorough preparation for the 
January FCC theater television hearings. The 
list of well qualified witnesses which appeared 
svas an outgrowth of three earlier appeals pre- 
sented before FCC by the Society. Experimental 
channels secured by the Society offered an op- 
portunity to determine by actual practice the 
form that national theatre television might take. 

The six points to be emphasized in the ex- 
panded program undertaken by the Society are: 

1. Form new SMPTE subsections in cities 
where film and television engineers need help 
and stimulation from joint meetings. 

2. Offer counseling assistance to colleges and 
universities interested in preparing engineering 
students for careers in motion pictures and 
television. 



3. Hnd gaps in the published engineering 
literature and offer a.ssistancc in filling them. 

4. Invite more active participation from 
oilier technical societies, trade associations and 
( ulliiral groups in •technical activities, and 
through these channels encourag? educational 
use of motion pictures, television and theatre 
television. 

5. Publish special engineering studies for the 
benefit of busines.smen. engineers and operating 
personnel giving information on the functions, 
applications and effects of current technical de- 
\elopments. 

6. The Society's public relations activities 
must emphasize (a) the nepd for special train- 
ing of young engineers for work in motion pic- 
lures, (bl the need for improved technical 
quality in classroom motion pictures and in 
the manner of presentation. Id the need for 
improved technical quality of films made for 
television to avoid a bad trade reaction that 
svould adversely affect future markets for such 
films and (d) the need for television broadcast- 
ers, motion picture companies and theatre cir- 
cuits to be constantly on the lookout for new 
products and processes available commercially 
or through research and development programs 
which they support wholly or in part. 

-As a final reason for the SMPTE expanded 
program Barnett cited the current public in- 
terest stimulated by three dimensional pictures. 
Cinerama new types of screens. These and 
other innovations likely to appear are the re- 
sult of many years of research. ^ 



The NATIONAL FILM BOARD 
of CANADA presents 

16nini Films of 

INDUSTRIAL & TRAVEL 
interest to BUSINESS MEN 

some recent lilies: 

ACCIDENTS DON'T HAPPEN (7 to 11 
mins. B. & \X . I — Six films on Safety 
in Industry. 

DATE OF BIRTH i 16 mins. B. & W. i 

— Important Plea for Over-45's in 

Industry. 
FAMILY OUTING 117 mins. col. or 

B. & W.I— Holiday in Banff National 

Park. 

CANADIAN CRUISE 1 14 mins. col. or 
B. & \^'. I — Through Eastern Canada 
in 40-fl. Iioat. 

MIGHTY MUSKIE 1 10 mins. col. or 
B. & V.I — Sportsmen match strength 
with inii-kelliinge. 

For latest CATALOGUES and full information 
on these and other recent releases 



The NATIONAL FILM BOARD of CANADA 

1270 Avenue of llie Americas 

New York 20. N. T. 



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An educational 

color motion picture 

on fire and 

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"NOT TOO HOT TO HANDLE" 

Successful handling of fire or motion pictures calls for ski 
and know-how of a professional character. 

Both of these techniques are exampled in the sound 
motion picture, "Not Too Hot To Handle," produced for 
Walter Kidde & Co., Inc. It is the privilege of The Jam Handy 
Organization to cooperate with Walter Kidde Co., Inc. 
In this activity designed to save lives, property and jobs. 

Whatever your business story ... it can be dramatica 
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5 SCREEN 

M A G A Z IN E 



UlH I 1953 




VOLUME 14 • 1953 



THE NATIONAL BUSINESS JOURNAL OF AUDIO-VISUAL COMMUNICATION 







/r\ 






FILMATURITY 



\J 




and fitter than ever 



ATLAS is the first business-film production company ever to reach its 40th Anniversary. 
Being among the first is a habit with Atlas. That's how we got to be forty! • Picture by picture, 
we enrich our Filmaturity, grow stronger and more vigorous • Screen our productions. 
Investigate our up-to-the-minute facilities. Consult with our people. Then you be the judge. 



CONSULTATION WITHOUT OBLIGATION 

ATLAS FILM CORPORATION 

Producers of Quality Motion Pictures, Sound Slidefiims, Theatrical Shorts, TV Commerciols 

ESTABLISHED 1913 

nn SOUTH BOULEVARD • OAK PARK, ILLINOIS • CHICAGO PHONE: AUSTIN 7-8620 



^ the wealth of mofure film 



skill ond iudgemeni achieved only (hrough many years of oc(uo/ produclion expe 




...but in films you need a 
4th dimension... 




REASONS-WHY are of little value — action-wise — until stirred to life 
by the emotions. That's why a factual message — even though 
beautifully pictured— needs the creative touch of imagination. 

This fourth dimension in the art of creating business films is not 
easily come by. Whatever the producer's instinct for promotion, it 
must be tempered by years of practical experience — not only in writ- 
ing, casting, directing, recording and editing, but above all else in the 
fine art of motivation. 

With Caravel this art has been acquired through serving repeat- 
edly many of America's leading business firms. For some of them we 
have made more than fifty motion pictures, and the work continues. 

\^'e will gladly show you why their confidence in Caravel is fully 
justified . . . and why it is nothing less than this time-honored 4th 
dimension— creative imagination— that brings them back to Caravel 
again and again. 



CARAVEL m FILMS, INC. 



7 3 FIFTH AVENUE 



NEW YORK 



TEL 



('IRC I. E 



6 110 



practically every 
film producer 
in the 
western 
hemisphere 
is a client of 



byron 




script 



cut 



location photography 



music lihrar 



J 



recording 



laboratory facilities 



titling 



animation 



sound stage 



sound effects 



Film producers use byron facilities 
for 4 reasons: quality, speed, 
economy, personal ser\ice. 
Visit our studios, or if you 
can't, ask for our 
neic illustrated brochure. 



editing 



color-correct* prints 



'Trademark — Exclusive nith byro 



byron 



Studios and Laboratory 



1226 Wisconsin Avenue, N.W. 
Washington 7, D. C. DUpont 7-1800 



lUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



"We taught 3 million teen-agers 
safe driving . . . indoors!" 



r I M It t H M K N > M I 1 t A I. 



I.TY COMPANY 





"....With SOUND 
:M0V1ES . . . and fine 
Bell & Howell equip- 
ment . . . tlie story really 
sinks in!" 

says James S. Kemper 

CHAIRMAN 




They learn faster, reniemlDer longer 

^vith SOUND MOVIES! 



In the public interest, Lumbermens Mutual 
Casualty Company, with the cooperation of the 
Los Angeles police department, has produced 
the Sergeant Bruce Reporting series of power* 
ful sound movies designed to teach better driv- 
ing to teen-agers. Only through this great, dra- 
matic teaching tool could so many have been 
reached so convincingly. 

In business and industry, church, school and 
farm, more and more group training leaders 
use sound movies to solve heretofore difficult 
and costly educational problems . . . and to do 
it belter.' No other training method so efficiently 



uses the tested principles of demonstration so 
economically, so easily. 

Bell & Howell, world famous for the develop- 
ment of fine audio-visual equipment offers you 
a wide variety of precision instruments to help 
you do the best job at the lowest cost. 

Bell&Howell 

imiLirs 11/ I III' imijil's fiurst 
(iiiilio-visiKtl rijiiijiinviil 



New! Magnetic Filmosound 

202 IGmm recording projector 
lets you add sound to movies 
easily, inexpensively. Add 
sound to old silent films, change 
sound to fit specific needs. Plays 
both optical and magnetic 
s.iund. From $699. 

()|>iir.il Filmosound 283 shows 

sound or silent films at their 
best ! Full, natural sound at all 
volume levels. From $449.95. 

FI.VD OIT TOD.W HOW 

BKl.L & HOWELL Al DIO- 

VISl AL F-Ol II'ME.NT 

(:4\ HELP I or; 



Bill & llnwrll Conip 
TI08 MrCormick Ro 
Chic-iKo 15. in. 



vithout cost 
. complete informa- 
equip. 



i Home C Church 



vol. I MF 14 



Sales Techniques 
Revolutionized with 

/^rtN ISmin 
(fgn "Suitcase" 
^-^ Projectors 



i{ r 



I iN E S 







Compfele Self Operoling Unit — No reels of film 
to thread — no screen to set up — no sound speaker 
to engage — all these features ore together in the 

"Flick" Ifs Ot>— Just plug into ony U5 volt elec- 
tricol outlet, AC or DC, ond with a "flick" of its 
switch the TSI projector is on ond running. 

Automatic Rewind — Due to exclusive 16mm film 
mogazine — film is outomoticolly rewound — no re- 
threading necessory — mogozine is power driven. 
It's ready to go after every show. 

Daylight Operotion — hJo need to drow shades or 
draperies. Crystol cieor pictures otq projected on 
the self contained screen in any lighted room. 

Compact — Model D or H (DeVry or Bell and 
Howell mechanism) — 135 sq. inch screen— only 
40 pounds. Eosy to corry. Cose size— 14"x22'j(12'. 

■^ Forced air cooling. 

■k Projects sound or silent films. 

Hr Projects black ond white or color films. 

if Mogozine copocity- 800 ft. 16mm film— (22 
min. sound — 32 min. silentl. 



projection (up to 2000 




Technical 
(q) Service 
Incorporated 

— Dept. C-4— 

30865 Five Mile Road 
LIVONIA, MICHIGAN, U. S. A. 




M A G A Z I N E 



Issue 3 • Volume 14 

PREVIEW' OF CONTENTS 

Trends in the News of Business Films 8 

New York Film Producers Hold Annual Aleetin;; 14 

Modern Installs Electronic Inspection Equipment 18 

Films and Producers Share National Honor Awards 22 

Panel Discusses Producer and Sponsor Responsihilities 30 

19.53 Calendar of Audio-Visual Events 33 

Christophers Bring Story of Hogan's Comehack to Screen 34 

lAVA Holds Seventh Annual Meeting 38 

Color Revolution by Courtney Hnfcla 43 

G.M. \ isualizes W oiuan's Viewpoint 46 

Studehaker Birthday 47 

Safety First Is Trucking's Goal as told by Dick Bt'nnett 48 

Standard Oil Presents "Midwest Holiday" 50 

Socony Improves on Loop Technique 58 

Background on Film Research 62 

An Abstract on Latest N.wal Research Plbi.ration 

Camera Eye: Late .Yen's About Business Films 28 

Wliat's New In Business Pictures: Film y'otes 52 

Picture Parade: .Veics About Films and Production 56 

The Commercial Newsreel: Veic Sponsored Films 60 

Television in the News 64 

New Products: Projectors and Production Equipment 66 

Peojde Who Make Pictures: News of Personnel 68 

Reference Shelf: Catalogue and Publications 71 

Plus: The N.\tio\al Directory of Vislal Edication Dealers 




Office of Publication: TU64 Slieridan Road. Chicago 26 

O. H Coelln. Jr.. Editor Everett Davis. Art Director 

Ken Duncan. Proiluction Mildred Jordan. Circulation 

Jane W are. Editorial Secrelarr 

Eastern Editorial Bureau Western Editorial Bureau 

Robert Seymour. Jr., Eastern Manager Edmund Kerr. Western Manager 

3038 Beverly Boulevard. Los Angeles 4 



4S9 Fifth Avenue. New York Citv 
Riverside 9-0215 or .MUrray Hill 2-2492 



Telephone: DUnkirk 8-0613 



I^sue Three. Volume Fourteen of Business Screen Magazine, published May 1, 1953. Issued 8 times annually at six-week inter- 
vals at /064 Sheridan Road. Chicago 26. Illinois by Business Screen .Maeazines. Inc. Phone BRiargale 4 8234. O. H. Coelln. Jr.. 
Editor and Publisher. In New York: Robert Seymour. Jr.. 489 Fifth .\venue. Telephone Riverside 9-0215 or MUrray Hill 2.'492 
In Los Angeles: Edmund Kerr. .!033 Beverly Blvd. Telephone DUnkirk 8-0613. Subscriptions $3.00 a year; S5.00 two years 



( tffice. .Address advertising and subscriptic 



B U S I .\ E S S S r. R E E \ .\1 .\ C .\ Z I N E 



*CHICAGO 

1345 Argyle Street 



What makes men good is held hy 

some to he nature, by others h(d>il 

or training, by others inslriirlion. 

—Aristotle (B.C.. .384-.^22). 



NEW YORK 

385 Madison Ave. 



^DETROIT 

1000 Dime Bidg. 



w« 



HAT MAKES good salesmen, most sales managers agree, 
is instruction in the (lualities and functions of the product, 
combined with persistent training in the proper presentation 
until it becomes habitual. Now and then, of course, is en- 
countered a natural born salesman, but most of that great army 
of men and women who are selling the good things of Ameri- 
can industry across the land, had to learn how. 

Over the years, it has been the privilege of Wilding through 
the use of words and pictures to make sales people more ef- 
fective whether the product was paint or pickles, newspapers 
or cheese, oranges or cement. 

If you have a selling problem — even before you have one — 
why not invite us to talk over with you the possibility of re- 
lating sales to pictures — Wilding pictures? 



CLEVELAND 

1010 Euclid Bidg. 



HOLLYWOOD 

5981 Venice Blvd. 



ST. LOUIS 

4378 Lindeli Blvd. 



CINCINNATI 

Enquirer Bidg. 



PITTSBURGH 

Law & Finance Bidg. 
'Studio Facilities 




WILDING 

PICTURE PRODUCTIONS, INC. 

MOTION PICTURES . SLIDEFILMS . TELEVISION FILMS 





SALES MANAGERS 

ARE LOOKING FOR YOU ! 



Today, 20,000 sales managers are look- 
ing for better ways to strengthen and 
train their far-flung sales forces and 
dealers. 

Many of these sales managers may not 
know it yet, but they're looking for you 
—a sound slidefilm producer. Because 
they may not know that the best way to 
train a spread-out sales force is with a 
sound slidefilm. The potential is there. 
And the time was never better to turn 
that potential into profit I 

Here's how you do it. Choose com- 
panies that depend upon salesmen for 
volume. Get in to see the sales manager. 




Tell him your story— show him how he 
can use sound slidefilm to do an effec- 
tive, economical job of training his 
salesmen and his dealers. 

Naturally, for the audio part of your 
slidefilm, you'll want to specify RCA 
Victor slidefilm recordings. You know 
from your own experience that RCA 
Victor delivers the clearest, crispest 
sound attainable in slidefilm recordings. 
Use this point when you talk to your 
prospect; it can help you close the sale. 

Remember— the market for sound slide- 
film has never been better. Be sure you 
get your share! 



Sales Managers need Sound Slidefilms 
for telling Salesmen and Dealers: 

— how to get more display space 

— how to develop local promotions 

— how to use selling time more efficiently 

— how a new product was developed 

— how to localize national merchandising campaigns 

— how product quality is controlled 

and much more! 



Fur full dclails i 

NEW YORK 

630 Fifth Ave. 

Dept. E- 50 

New York 20. N.Y. Chicago II. Ill 

JUdson 2-5011 WHITEHALL 4-3215 



licJc'filni rcconlini^s. contact office nearest yott. 
CHICAGO HOLLYWOOD 

445 N. Lake Shore Dr. 1016 N. Sycamore Ave. 
Dept. E- 50 Dept. E- 50 

Holly\vood 38, Calif. 

HILLSIDE 5171 



Custom Record Sales 



RADIO CORPORATION OF AMERICA 



RCA VICTOR DIVISION 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 










Sa^ 



RICHARD R. BRANGAN, advertising i 
National Automatic Tool Company In 



HEAVY machinery manufacturers have the- ideal solu- 
tion for their sales promotion problems in the 
Stereo-REALIST Camera. Short of the actual product itself, 
Realist pictures can't be beat for true-to-life realism. For 
the Realist exactly duplicates what you see with your 
eyes — in full, natural color and life-like three dimensions. 

What's more. Realist sales kits consisting of slides 
and a viewer weigh only 40 ounces. Small wonder that 
salesmen like them! And they also appreciate the impact 
that Realist pictures have on their customers, the atten- 
tion they gain, and the lasting impression they leave. 

Sales managers the nation over have proclaimed the 
Realist to be "the world's finest visual selling tool." The 
variety of its applications is universal. Investigate the 
possibilities of its use in your field. If you haven't seen 
Realist pictures, ask your camera dealer to show you 
some. Or for free, informative folder write: David 
'White Company, 319 W. Court St., Milwaukee 12,'VVis. 



f—^it 




$159.00 (Tax Inc.) 



•Realist 



STEREO 

The camera that "sees" — in 3 tlimensions — the same as you 

Cameras, Vieuers. PrnitctOTS, and AccestorifS are products 
of tbe David White Company, Miluaukee 12, Wisconsin, 



NUMBER 3 • VOLUME 14 



this 



rlli,,;. |,, 




U. S. (iO> ERN^IENT FILMS 



16mm SOUND MOTION PICTURES AND 
35mm FILM STRIPS 



itself t<i 




>(c)®(D 

Instructional Films 

/ iihide for iiccuidcy by 20 iiiljcrcnt \ 
\ ci^einies of the Federal Gort. I 

\ ^ 

Some 1953 releases now ovoiloble: 

ARMED FORCES SCREEN MAGAZINE ^502 
Current happenings in the Armed Forces. 

A NEW BEGINNING 

Servires of the United Mine Workers Welfore Board. 

HASrr SIGN MAKING 

Silk screen process in sign making. 

LOOKING AHEAD 

Benefits of new Socio! Security coveroge. 

Rx AniTUDE 

Relationships between hospital personnel and potients. 

UNION LOCAL 

Operation of a machinist's union, including its monogement 

relationships. 

ETHIOPIA IN THE FREE WORLD 
Ethiopia's participation in the Koreon War. 



1445 Pork Ave, New York 29, N. Y. 
Use coupon for I9S3 catalog of over 3000 filn 

UNITED WORLD FILMS, INC. 

Government Film OepI 

144S Pork Ave., New York V> 

n Send "le your 1953 colalog. 

n Add me to your regular moiling list. 



School _ 
Addreis 




IN THE NEWS OF BUSINESS FILMS 



H,-T, 



I Dialer Triiining I'rofiriiin Thai 
Ihv H.arl <./ Busiiirss I'rohl,,,, 



■K Tlie pride we hold in these sight sound media. 
nou lieing so widely applied in business and 
education, is justified from time to time as the 
clouds of detail and function part and the bright 
sliining light of results cuts through like sun- 
shine in the spring. 

Such a moment came to us at a recent luiu hcoii 
meeting hosted by a pttrideum company execu- 
tive who.se nationwide dealer training program 
was just then taking effect all over the countrv . 
This concern spends millions each year for ma- 
jor TV and radio programs, color ads in the 
national magazines and a tremendous direct mail 
activity. But it also shares, in common, uith 
most petroleum companies, the annually large 
number of business failures among service sta- 
tion operators. 

Advertising Alone Can't Hold Line 

All the king's horses of consumer advertis- 
ing can't pull inept managers out of the holes 
they dig for themselves through inadequate 
record-keeping nor can they drag a prospect in- 
to an ill-kempt service station if any nearby 
competitor looks or serves better. So that last 
critical mile to success can only be measured on 
the amount of "heart"' and workable ideas for 
self-improvement that help these countless thou- 
sands of service people hold and manage their 
businesses. 

That s where ice the film medium, come in. 
At this vital stage out in the field. SO valuable 
minutes of a one-day meeting program with all 
dealers are taken up by films. And these films, 
this year, were especially down-to-earth. One 
of them showed, by story example, how one 
Joe licked his bookkeeping problem. Another 
film showed the dealer's local marketing prob- 
lem and what to do about it. A third showed 
the scope of the company's national ad program 
and interpreted its meaning to each individual 
dealer, in terms of personal followup. 

The main feature, dealing w ith service station 
record-keeping, charge accounts, inventories, 
etc.. was the '"kicker" in this deal. 

Film Suggestion Ls Getting Results 
Suggesting that even a part-time bookkeeper 
was the answer for this manager's problem, 
the picture also worked in some ideas on im- 
proved employee relations. We hear that the re- 
action has already been remarkable. The hiring 
of women on this basis by .service stations is 
being widely reported to the sponsor. 

As these thousands of dealers meet an<l ab- 
sorb the messages of the films, we are reminded 
that no other method of presentation could 
possibly be as unjailingly similar and vomplele. 
Nor. in this instance, as vitally important to a 
big segment of the nations basic economv as 



If lou want the answer in cold, hard cash. 
Ihise films probably cost less than S2(M).()()0. If 
ihcy save just a few key stations or increase 
business through a belter-balanced sales pro- 
gram in a few hundred locations, their cost will 
lie a minute fraction of the tremendous dividends 
their sponsor already figures they are earning 
bir him. Bl' 



7'/ic Ilcl/iiiig Hand l)i'i>arlm<'nl If'orks 
Overtime During Activo Ediliirinl Month 
+ In these eventful days of I'JS.'j. wc"re writing 
script for a travelogue of our own, a sort of 
visual "Pepy"s Diary" detailing the missionary 
efforts which onlv a business magazine pub- 
lisher could find himself doing. 

For instance, the night of April 27 found ye 
Editor in ""The Best Location in the Nation" 
I Cleveland, of course I doing some moderating 
for a panel of our peers in the auditorium of 
the Cleveland Public Library where some 150 
good citizens came to hear about '"Producer and 
Sponsor Responsibilities in the Production of 
Motion Pictures."' Next a.m. l.so early I we de- 
planed at Chicago for a keynote talk to old pals 
and some new ones at the Industrial Audio- 
Visual Associalirjn's 7th Annual Convention just 
assembling. 

Out of three davs of lAVA meetin" and learn- 
in" we're back to our "regular" job as film 
chairman for Chicago's '53 Community Fund 
Champaign, wherein public relations are ably 
guided by brother Ed Logelin. I . S. Steel's head 
man of that department. 

Betimes, as diaries go. theres a new series 
of very specific Film Guides to edit, a new Pro- 
jectionist"s Handbook to whip along, these big- 
ger and better issues of Business Screen you're 
seeing: and. lab deadlines, where are thy 
sting?! a long overdue article for the .American 
Trade Association Executives' Forum. 

Mix that batch with a little guidance for the 
.'\merican .Association of Film Producers I good 
idea, that) and you get a fair idea of why we 
occasionally cast a longing glance at the fair 
water and the high pines of our Northern Wis- 
consin lodge. Come and see us at Totem Bay 
some time! Jg" 

A Stffd Exjtortt'r L'srs Some Handy Tools 
to Make an Effrctivr Meeting Show 
M (Jeorge W. Wolf, president of the United 
States .Steel Export Company, recently made a 
presentation before top executives of the L^.S. 
Steel Companies at a semi-annual meeting in 
Pittsburgh which involved a talk and the com- 
bined effects of glass color slides, motion pic- 
tures with magnetic sound track and a printed 
manual for take-home purposes after the meet- 
ing at Steels headquarters. 

For the one-shot presentation, several films 
(m the subject. Canada, were purchased and 
edited, and Mr. Wolf dubbed his connnentary 
on the Reeves magnetit track with which the 
film had been coated. The introduction to the 
speech and closing remarks were illustrated with 
4 b\ 5 inch glass Ektaihrome slides projected 

(coxTiMEi) (IN Tin-: KDi.i.ow INT. page) 



B L S I N E .S S SCREEN M .4 G .\ Z I N E 




lighining 
masiets 



Lightning, the violent force which for many years plagued electric 
power transmission systems, has found its master. To emphasize the 
important part lightning arresters play in transmitting an uninter- 
rupted flow of electrical energy, we have produced a new color film, 
"Lightning Masters," for General Electric ... transmitting an uninter- 
rupted flow of thought via the powerful medium of motion pictures. 



^ STUDIOS *^^ 



HOLLYWOOD • NEW YORK • CHICAGO • DETROIT 



NUMBER 3 • VOLUME 14 • 1953 




THE EXCELLENCE OF 

Precision 
Prints 



« 



STEP PRINTING 

ELIMINATES 
CONTACT SHIFTS 

The sharpness ol a print depends on 
close contact between original and 
print stock. In step printing at Pre- 
cision, the two films are absohiU-U 
stationary during exposure. Timiiii; 
and effects are produced without 
notching original. 




YOUR ASSURANCE OF 
BETTER 16mm PRINTS 



15 Years Research and Spe- 
cialization in every i)hase of 
16mm processing, visual and 
aural. So organized and equip- 
ped that all Precision jobs are 
of the highest quality. 

Individual .Vttenlion is given 
each" film, each reel, each scene, 
each frame — through every 
phase of the complex business of 
processing — assuring you of the 
very best results. 

Our Advanced Methods and 

our constant checking and adop- 
tion of up-tO'the-minute tech- 
niques, plus new engineering 
principles and special machinery 



k: 



Precision Film Laboratories — a di- 
vision of J. A. Maurer, Inc., has 14 
years of specialization in the 10mm 
field, consistently meets the latest de- 
mands for higher quality and speed. 



enable us to offer service un- 
equalled anywhere! 

Newest Facilities in the 16mm 
field are available to customers 
of Precision, including the most 
modern applications of elec- 
tronics, chemistry, physics, optics, 
sensitomelry and densitometry— 
including exclusive Maurer- 
designed equipment— your guar- 
antee that only the best is yours 
at Precision! 



PRECISION 



FILM LABORATORIES, INC. 



w York 19, N.Y. 
JU 2-3970 



TRENDS IN BUSINESS FILMS 

(continued from pace eight) 
by a machine which faded out when the movie 
faded in and vice versa. 

The visual presentation resulted in a slick op- 
eration and went over most effectively. Walter 
Jones, assistant advertising manager of U.S. 
Steel Export Company, took charge of plans for 
the show, and it was written, edited and recorded 
by William Buch of Willard Pictures Inc. 

.'tflmiral's Visit of Inspect ion to Jam Handy 
Studios Unveils Extensive Defense Work 

■K Just below the surface swells of politics, peace 
parleys and the business of this country's normal 
productive activities, the quiet but vital work of 
research and development goes along almost un- 
noticed, excepting on the atomic test range of 
the Nevada flats. But in the news, on the closing 
day of March, came an item which illustrates 
the important role being filled in national defense 
by one of the industry's pioneer firms. 

A visit of inspection by Rear Admiral Daniel 
V. Gallery. USN, Chief of Navy Air Training 
Reserve, to The Jam Handy Organization studios 
and development workshops at Detroit disclosed 
some of the extensive military training projects 
completed and being worked on by Handy engi- 
neers, film technicians, and other craftsmen. In- 
spection of the new 3-D hemispherical lens de- 
veloped by the JHO optical engineering staff and 
recently put in use at the Special Devices Center, 
Port Washington, New York, was one of the 
principal objectives of the Admiral's visit. The 
company is filming a series of medical motion 
pictures for the Navy and a motion picture series 
of aircraft familiarization is also being produced. 

Admiral Gallery is the Atlantic skipper famed 
for his exploits in bagging a German U-boat 
during the War — the first enemy warship cap- 
tured on the high seas since 1815. He is also the 
author of "Clear the Decks" recently published 
in the Saturday Evening Post. ^ 

Rear Admir-\l Daniel V. Gallery (extreme left) 
looks on as Jamison Handy, president of The 
Jam Handy Organization (center) explains one 
of many training devices created al Detroit 
studio for the armed services. (stor\ above). 




10 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



Which (3R.(xne a^e you in p 




NEW 10" MICROGROOVE Slide Film Record 



OLD 16" STANDARD Slide Film Record 



You can't say more on a standard groove rec- 
ord — but you sure pay more. You pay up to 
50% more for the sheer difference in size and 
weight. More for pressing, more for packing, 



more for shipping and storage. You pay more 
— yet you get nowhere near the quality of 
Microgroove. Send the coupon today. Let us 
help you get in the right groove. 



COLUMBIA 
TRANSCRIPTIONS 

A DIVISION OF COLUMBIA RECORDS 
ORIGINATORS OF THE MICROGROOVE RECORD 

T-«de.m<irk "Columbl." Re<j. U. S. Pol. 0!f. Marcas Reqlstrados 



Columbia Transcriptions 

799 Seventh Avenue, New York 19, New York 

We are interested in the full cost and quality story 
on Microgroove Records. 

Name 



Company- 
Address — 
City 



NUMBER 3 • \ O I. IM E It • 1953 



11 




RCA SOUND RECORDING 

35 mm and 16 mm studio mixing • 35 mm and 16 mm 
transfers • magnetic location recording • music library 

EDITORIAL DEPARTMENT 

Production and newsreel editing • matching • A&B 
roll preparation • rental facilities 

LABORATORY DEPARTMENT 

16 mm color printing • 16 mm B&W developing and 
printing • 35 mm to 16 mm reduction printing • effects 
• vacuumating 



A LETTER OR CALL FROM YOU WILL BRING COMPLETE DETAILS 




BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



Compare >\^ith any other 



Color Duplicating Film . . . 
then you'll insist on ANSCO TYPE 238! 




I^emember, the prints vou release are the most powerful 
representatives vou have in the tield. Excellent ones can 
bring vou new business, while indifterent ones mav drive 
old customers awav. That's whv it's j^ood business tor vou to 
make this comparison and \\ hv it's hettiT hiisi/icss to insist 
that ever\ ihmm color release print you deliver is made on 
Ansco Tvpe 2^8! 

/I.JNI OV_>( W Binghamton. N. Y. A Division of Gen 



Fast processing 

through New York, 

Chicago and 

Hollywood 



era! Aniline iV Film Corporition. "I'rom RcScan/i to Reality. 



NUMBER 3 • A O I, r M E II 



For Instant Movability 
and Advanced Design 



David Pincus Elected President; Walter Lowendohl, VP 
as Film Producers Association of N. Y. Elects Board 



"HYDROLLY" 

(TV OR CAMERA DOLLY) 

Hydraulic liit type for fast up- 
ward and downward motion 
of TV and Motion Picture 
cameras. Lightweight — sturdy 
— easily transported in a sta- 
tion wagon. Fits through a 
28" door. Adjustable leveling 
head. In-line wheels lor track 
use. Steering wheel and floor 
locks. 




SYNCHRO-FILM-ED SYNCHRONIZER 




A Precision instrument for 

Synchronization and Measurement of 

16mm and/or 35mm Films 

Any combination of sprockets assembled to 
your specifications. Sturdy cast aluminum 
construction. Foot linear type, with frame 
divisions engraved on sprockets. Contact 
rollers adjusted individually for positive 
film contact. Fast finger-tip roller release, 
sprocket shaft slip lock, complete with foot- 
age counter. 



VARIABLE SPEED MOTOR with TACHOMETER 
for Cine Special and Maurer Cameras 



IIS V. Universal Motor— AC-DC 
Variable Speed 8-64 Frames 
Separate Bose for Cine Speeiol 
Adapter for Maurer Camera 

INTERCHANGEABLE MOTORS: 

12 Volt DC Variable Speed 8-64 Frames. 
115 Volt AC 60 Cycle. Synchronous Motor. 
Single Phase. 

Animation Motors for Cine Special. Mauier, 
B & H, Mitchell Cameias, Motors tor Bolex and 
Filmo Cameras, and Time Lctpse Equipment. 

• LENS COATING 

• "T" STOP CALIBRATION 

• DESIGNING and MANUFACTURING 

of lens mountings and camera equipment 
for 16mm and 35nun cameras. 

• BAUSCH & LOMB **BALTAR" 

LENSES and others for Motion Picture and 
TV Cameras. 

• RENTALS — SALES — REPAIRS: 

Mitchell. Eyemo. Bell S Howell. Wall. 
Cine Special Cameras. 

Write for full Information and prices 




JOHN CLEMENS 



ERWIN HARWOOD 



NATIONAL CINE EQUIPMENT, Inc. 

209 WEST 48th STREET. NEW YORK 36. N. Y. 



■K llwil) I. I'l\( I s. |)rcsi(lciil iif 
CaraMl Kiliiis. Inc.. was elected 
president of the Film Producers As- 
swiation of New York at the an- 
nual meeting of the organization 
held in New York City on April 30. 
Mr. I'incus succeeds Peter Moonky 
of Audio Productions, retiring chief 
executive who led the group in 
their recent negotiations with the 
Screen Actors Guild. 

Lamm Re-elected Trea.siirer 
W.4LTER LOWENDAHL of TranS- 
film. Inc. is the newly-elected vice- 
president; Leslie Roush of Leslie 
Roush Productions, is secretary; 
and Edward Lamm, Pathescope 
Productions' president, was re- 
elected treasurer. Mr. Mooney, 
Ralph Cohn of Screen Gems and 
Herbert Kerkow of Herbert Ker- 
kow. Inc. were elected directors of 
the FPA. 

Two new companies were joined 
in membership. Depicto Films and 
United World Films, leading East- 
ern producers, were accepted by the 
association during the annual pro- 
ceedings. 

Conducted SAG Negotiation 

Through months of negotiation 
with the Screen Actors Guild on be- 
half of all companies producing 
television film commercials, mem- 
bers of the Film Producers Asso- 
ciation successfully worked out the 
present interim agreement which 
now serves sponsors, agencies and 
producers. John Wheeler, attor- 
nev for the Association, is currently 
fiiroute to California where he will 
represent the group in final nego- 
tiations with SAG. 9 



Oil Industry Information Group 
Filming Story of Wllllston Basin 

♦ The Oil hulustry Information 
Committee has announced that its 
new motion picture ( to be released 
next fall during Oil Progress Week I 
will dramatize the story behind the 
story of the discovery of oil in the 
Williston Basin in .North Dakota. 
Appropriately, the title of the new 
film will be American Frontier. 

It will show how the discovery 
of oil in April, 1951. changed 
the whole economic and social de- 
M'lopment of a section of modern 
America; how the first successful 
well put new life and new mean- 
ing into a rural area where farmers 
and ranchers aUke had depended 
upon the vagaries of the weather 
and a single crop. 

The 1953 motion picture will be 



a rcal-iifc (Imuiiieiitary, a true story 
using Williston Basin residents as 
its cast. It will record the day-by- 
day bustle and transformation that 
takes place in the development of a 
new frontier. 

Location Work Finished 
Location photography, which re- 
quired two months of hard work in 
the frigid farm land, already has 
been completed. Camera crews, be- 
cause of the sub-zero weather, were 
forced to use heaters and warmers 
for their equipment. Parkas, snow 
sleds and similar arctic accessories 
were mandatory accoutrements as 
the photographers bucked 20-foot 
snow drifts and freezing weather. 

American Frontier will be pre- 
miered on a national basis next Oc- 
tober when the industry observes 
Oil Progress Week. It will be made 
available at the time for television 
showings, for schools, meetings of 
business, professional and social 
clubs, theaters and other interested 
users. 

Four Other Films in I'se 
It will be a companion to other 
one motion pictures such as Cross- 
roads, U.S.A., Man on the Land, 
24 Hours of Progress, and Tlie Last 
Ten Feet. 

American Frontier is being pro- 
duced for the Oil Industry Infor- 
mation Committee by Affiliated 
Films, Inc., under the supervision 
of Film Counselors, Inc. The OIIC 
Film Sub-committee in direct charge 
of the project is headed by H. L. 
Curtis, of Shell Oil Co.. New York. 
Other members are P. C. Hum- 
phrey, The Texas Companv, New 
York; George L. Randall. Richfield 
Oil Corp., Los Angeles: Reynolds 
Girdler. Sinclair Oil Corp., New 
York: Conger Reynolds. Standard 
Oil Company, (Indiana!. Chicago; 
and E. A. Williford, Continental 
Oil Company. Oklahoma City. Okla. 

New York Film Producers Are Asked 
To Exhibit in Advertising Show 

♦ Film producers in the New York 
area are being asked to exhibit in 
The Advertising Essentials Show, a 
new exposition planned for each 
spring and fall by Advertising 
Trades Institute, Inc. 

This spring's fair will be held 
at the Biltmore Hotel on June 9 and 
10. Besides film producers, exhibi- 
tors will include graphic arts sup- 
pliers, art services, display produc- 
ers, and commercial photographers. 
Only New York's 13,700 advertising 
executives and buyers will be in- 
vited to attend. 



14 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 




LASTING VALUE 



A motion picture, skillfully conceived and well Mofiy Sound Masters films made years ago are still 

produced, can serve its purpose for a long period of time. working for their sponsors. They have, with powerful 

It is this ingredient of lasting value that assures a big impact, reached millions of selected people at a cost of 

return in terms of total audience reached and influenced. but a small fraction of a cent per person. 




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IV/iat's all this talfc about... 

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It's the topic of the day, in educational circles at 
every teaching level. The vu-LVTE offers remark- 
able aid in making teaching more effective. It is 
the opaque projector with the greatest facilities and 
mechanical superiorities. 

What IS an opaque projector? The Beseler vu-lvte 
is an ultra-modern, professional-type teaching tool, 
embodying an entirely new principle in opaque pro- 
jection. Its exclusive features afford versatility of 
application and flexibility of operation. All sorts of 
free and easily available materials can be projected 
to a screen in natural colors. These include maps, 
diagrams, homework papers, pictures, books, maga- 
zines, and solid objects. Slides and preliminary prep- 
aration of materials are not required. 

What can it DO for me? vu-lyte will help to 
heighten class interest. Pupils will grasp subjects 
more readily. Lessons so learned are longer retained. 
It will make it possible for you to use more illustra- 



tive materials to enrich class discussions and in- 
creased pupil participation will become a natural 
result. 

What ARE its advantages? VU-LYTE is simple to 
operate; provides the brightest, sharpest pictures in 
brilliant colors, and can be used in a partially lighted 
room. No similar projector has so many exclusive 
advantages. These mclude the VACUMATIC PLATEN, 
to hold unmounted copy ffat; FEED-O-MATIC' CON- 
VEYOR, to easily feed in new copy and eject the used, 
automatically; POINTEX* PROJECTION pointer, to 
throw on the screen a movable arrow of light oper- 
ated by the teacher from beside the machine. 

These and other educational and technical ad- 
vantages are described in a free folder prepared 
for teachers and administrative personnel. A copy 
of "OPENING THE DOOR TO THE MIND " and a free 
demonstration of the vu-lyte without cost or obliga- 
tion is yours for the asking. 



VU-LYTE 

OPAQUE PROJECTOR 



CHARLES 



(Ssde^&/i> 



COMPANY 



60 Badger Avenui 

The World's Largest Monuf a c fur e 



Newark 8, N. J. 

>« Opoque Pro/ecHon Eqo 



tPalcnl Pending 



Charles Beseler Co. 

60 Badger Ave., Newark 8, N. J. 

Gentlemen: 

n Please send me your free folder, "OPENING THE DOOR TO THE MIND." □ Have your 

representative contact me to arrange a free demonstrot/on of the VU-LYTE of our school. 

Nome 



School 

Address- 
City 



Ou Ponf Sales Reach A New High 
But Taxes Cut Stock Earnings 

♦ L. I. I)u I'.iiil di- Nemours' sales 
reached a new high of Sl:602 mil- 
lion last year hut. with federal taxes 
of .$8.17 a share, earnings over 1951 
increased only six cents a share, the 
ronipany disclosed in its annual re- 
port to stockholders in .March. Earn- 
ings were S-1.70 per common share 
against S1-.64 a share in 1951. 

The sales peak resulted frurii 
greater production of newer prod- 
ucts hy new plants and proce.sses 
and hy recent plant expansions. But 
the normal and "excess profits" 
taxes result ""in rates as high as 82 
percent on earnings from Du Font's 
new plants and processes," the re- 
port said. 

Du Font's newer products more 
than offset declines in some of the 
older lines, the report said. The 
company's index of selling prices 
was about the same as in 1951. New 
products brought to market in the 
last 25 years currently account for 
more than half of all product sales. 

There were 142,744 owners of 
Du Pont stock at the end of the 
vear. an increase of 4.576 during 
1952. Of these, the report said, 
20.559 are groups which "include 
estates, trusts, insurance companies, 
investment funds, churches, schools 
etc., and represent millions of peo- 
ple who have an indirect interest in 
the company s operations. ' 

"Visfarama" Wide Screen Process 
Announced by Carl Dudley 

♦ ""Vistarama." a new wide screen 
process requiring no glasses, has 
been de\'eloped by the Vistarama 
Corporation and may soon be avail- 
able to producers and distributors 
for both 16 and .35mm according 
to an announcement by Carl Dud- 
ley, president of the new company. 

The new process, said to be com- 
patable with 20th Century-Fox' 
CinemaScope, utilizes ananiorphic 
glass designed by the Simpson Op- 
tical Company. The screen propor- 
tions are 1 to 2.66. matching Cine- 
maScope screens. Stnaller screens 
for 16mm projection are being de- 
veloped. 

Carl Dudley, who is also presi- 
dent of Dudley Pictures Corpora- 
tion and Dudley Television Cor- 
poration, said, "'Vistarama is a 
wide screen anamorphic type cam- 
era and projection lens system that 
will match any known process. It 
is available to majors and inde- 
pendents alike and equally as ef- 
fective for 16mni systems.'" 

In addition, Dudley points out, 
the new process will be available 
with Vistaphonic sound in both 16 
and 35mm film programs. ^ 



16 



BUSINESS SCREEN M A G .\ Z I N E 



ANOTHER PRODUCTION THAT DEMANDS THE ^©S^IE IN PRINT QUALITY 



THE 



ALAN YOUNG 



SHOW 






On Q 














" Pleased with your work . . . flattered by your attention . . , 
amazed at your delivery time." 

— ALA'S l)l\EHART. Exeriilivo fraducer Alan Young Prmliiclions 



COLOR PRINTS «no 

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B&W DEVELOPING 



B&W REVERSAL 



WORK PRINTS , B&W DUPE NEGATIVES FROM 
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REDUCTIONS FROM 35MM , ELECTRONIC RE- 
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NUMBER 3 • vol. r ME It • I <l S 3 




Entire Modern Distribution Network of 27 Exchanges Get 
Electronic Film inspection Machines in Record Purchase 



BOUND \ OLLMES OF BUSINESS SCREEN ISSUES 

♦ Complete bound volumes of a\ailable while supply lasts at 

all 1952. 1951. 19.50 and 1949 .S7..5() per volume. Order today 



i<-ues of Bl si\F<< 



at 71164 Sherida 



Chi. 



26. 



♦ The signing of a purchase order 
to equip all of the 27 film exchanges 
of Modern Talking Picture Service, 
with "Inspect-O-Filni" auto- 
malic 16mni print inspecting ma- 
chines has been announced in .New 
^ ork City by Frank Arlinghaus. 
president of the national sponsored 
lilni distribution network. The order 
involves some S60.000.00 worth of 
llie electronic film inspecting ma- 
ines and. according to Arling- 
baus. will result in substantial bene- 
fits for Modern's many clients and 
film users in terms of extended print 
life and defect-free showings. 

Conducted 2-Year Test 
The signing of this order make? 
Modern the first national film dis- 
tributor to install this revolutionary 
new equipment on a nationwide 
basis. The decision to make the in- 
stallations was based on Moderns 
experience with two "Inspect-0- 
Film" units purchased two years 
ago and subjected to continuous in- 
service testing since that time. As a 
part of this program Modern has 
collaborated with the Harwald Com- 
pany, manufacturer of the units, in 
working out design improvements 
and library utilization procedures. 
"Our experience indicates that 
on the basis of good print condition 
and increa.sed print life alone, the 
machines are an excellent invest- 
ment, ' Arlinghaus stated. ""In addi- 
tion, we expect eventual savings in 
labor costs, and we are particularly 
glad that through the last word in 
film inspection we will be able to 
offer prints in uniformly perfect con- 
dition to our film users throughout 
the country while at the same time 
we will be safeguarding the invest- 
ment in prints made by the sponsor- 
ing companies." 

Set for Fall Season 
The "Inspect-O-Film" is an auto- 
matic electronic and mechanical de- 
\ ice for use by the film exchange 
in checking 16mm projection prints 
for broken or enlarged sprocket 
holes, sprocket punch marks, breaks, 
and y arious other defects that would 
cause difficulties in projection. It 
automatically counts film footage 
and splices, and shuts itself off when 
it completes the inspection cycle. 
It is manufactured by the Harwald 
Company in Evanston. Illinois. 

Deliveries to the 27 Modern film 
exchanges are scheduled to be com- 
pleted by midsummer in order to 
make it possibje for all prints to 
have ""Inspect-O-Film" inspection 
Ill-fore the busy Fall season. Other 



(■wners of "Inspect-O-Film" ma- 
< bines include the Los Angeles 
Schools, the U. S. Marine Corps, 
the Arkansas State Department of 
Kducatir)n. Cleneral Films. Ltd.. of 
Canada and the l". S. Veterans Ad- 
ministration. 9- 



Fnterprising Denver A-V Dealer 
Sparks Business & Industry Show 

* Dealer promotion enterprise 
scored hea\il\ last month when the 
(Colorado Visual Aids Supply Cojn- 
pan\. Den\er. played host to busi- 
ness and industry leaders in that 
mountain state at a two-day exhibit 
of audio and visual aids held in 
their facilities on April 20 and 21. 

Highlight of the program was a 
special ""Visual .■Mds' dinner meet- 
ing of the .Sales Executive Club of 
Denver, attended by 145 members 
and guests. Adolph Wertheimer, 
vice-president of the Radiant .Man- 
ufacturing Company, was the guest 
speaker at this occasion. His ad- 
dress, a practical exposition on the 
useful role of films and other aids 
for many purposes in business, was 
received with enthusiastic applause. 

The audio-visual industry was 
also represented by Line Burrows, 
Eastman Kodak Company: Ben 
Peirez. View lex. Inc.: Martin My- 
ers, the Chas. Beseler Company: 
and local sales representatives of 
Bolex. Viewmaster. and the Polaroid 
Corporation. 

Special demonstrations of the 
overhead projector, three - dimen- 
sional photography, tape recording, 
and new projection screen develop- 
ments were among the exhibit items 
offered visitors. Credit for this 
helpful contribution to Denver's 
business community goes to Harold 
Guzofsky . head of the Colorado 
Visual Aids Supply Company. S" 



Picture Optical Printer 

axailahle with 

Owner Operator 

Modern complete machine 
. . . .'^.Smm to ."^510171 and 
16nnn to .'-iSmm Acme pro- 
jector and camera. Registra- 
tion to .0(K)1 inches. Over 
200 TV commercials, many 
features and blow-ups in 
color and b w. Owner has 
long experience with major 
Hollywood studios. Reason- 
able.' 

W rite Box 55 
Bl siNEss Screen 

W) Kiflh Avenue 
-New lork 17. New York 



18 



BUSINESS SCREEN M .\ G .A Z I N E 




TROUBLE COMMUNICATING? 

IF SO — OUR CREATIVE AND PRODUCTION STAFF CAN CONTRIBUTE 
UNIQUE AND VALUABLE SERVICES TO INSURE THE MOST EFFECTIVE 
METHOD OF COMMUNICATING IDEAS TO AUDIENCES THROUGH THE 
PROPER UTILIZATION OF BETTER MOTION PICTURES. 



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60 EAST 42NO STI1E6T. NEW YORK 17. NEW yO«IC • PAlMOtlVE BUILDING, CHICAGO. IIUNOIS • 201 NORTH OCCIOENTAl (CU'.EVARO. lOS ANCEIES 34, CAUFORNIA 



M M It K K 3 • \ O I. I M K II 



it keeps 'em owake 
on both sides 
of tlie liall 



A user of Sound Slidefilm who knows about the dead- 
ening effect of unevenly distributed sound writes us, 
"maybe your miracle equipment would keep both sides 
of the hall awake." 

The greatest advance that has ever been made in 
Sound Slidefilm Ekjuipment was when we changed the 
direction of the sound. 

Never before had sound been evenly distributed by 
a machine sitting in the midst of the audience. 

It had always been blasted at some and away from 
others, and still is by some machines. 

The Patented PICTUREPHONE proves the com- 
plete and only solution of this problem. 

The result is that numerous users have switched away 
from machines that blast at some and starve others, and 
adopted the PICTUREPHONE. 

If you want your audience to be awake on both sides 
of the hall, get in touch with us. 



— ONE OF TEN MODELS — MODEL L 




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pounds 



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0. J. McCLURE TALKING PICTURES 

Telephone CAnal 6-4914 



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20 



BUSINESS SCREEN M A G .^ Z I N E 




^^The Aciidi'm\ votes ... to (icor^e Alfred Mitchell —'" 

\l tlu' 25lli Aiiiiii.il Aiuilfiny Awiii(l> I'rr.M'iilaliuii?. (lliarlf.- Hiaikcll. l'rc>iiliMil nl tin- 
•\(a<l«'mv of Miitinii Pirliirc Arts iiiiil Sciciicf^. niiidf lliis "Oscar" award in rci'ofinitiiin "f 
spci'ial (■oiitrilxitioii'- iiiadf llinnifiliKiil llic |ia«l 2."> \cars; 

"l-asl iii<;lit lilt' Hoard of (iovcriiors drrw up tin- following cilalioii: 
■'For tilt' desi-jn. devt'lopnifiit. and niaiiiitactiiri- of- llic motion pirliiii> camera which 
iH'ar^ his name: for the introduction of ccpiipnicnt which st. impeded the artistic progress of 
fihn^. and for his continued an<l ihtminant presence in tlie field of cinenuito^raphy . . . the 
\..i<lemy votes an Honorary -\ward to Ceoifie \lfred \Iit. hell." 



/HitMlG^mmi 



11 1//1 uniil iinilf unit ilvffi unitiliiilr 
<,.:.rfr Mjn-il \t,uh,nmUi„.uledf,;^ 
this Himorary Irnilrmy iiunril mailv by 
ihf Arnilrmy iij Moliim I'irliirr Arl* and 
*«■ lenrei nt its ^.'tlli Aniiiinl I'ri'wnlaliiini. 

Il If Irinliliiinnl itf Milrhrll CnmiTa.* 
lliiil, in nilililion to /i/min;; llu- tctrlds 
srrnlesi films, ihry ari' In hi- jimtul 
II lim'trr ni'ii nnil rxiiriinf ti-rhixiifUfA 
.>/ initliun pit liiri' phnlngraphy 
iiri' hfin/i furri'Sijully used. 




CORPORATION 



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666 W«tt Harvard StrMt • OUndal* 4, Calif. • CabU Addraui "MITCAMCO" 

the profesbionai mutiun pit^iun-) ^nown inroucjhout the world Ore (ilotsd 



(ilcnad with o Mitthc 



N I Nt It t; K I 



N o I I M t: II 




Films and Producers Share National Honor Awards 



SALES 



THE Cflfllf fifl^mflflT INC. 

MOTION PICTURE AND TV PRODUCTION EQUIPMENT 



Phone: Circle 6-0930 
Coble Address CAMERAMART 



Academy Award Winning Picture 
Directed by MPO's Jean Oser 
♦ Jean Oser. associate producer at 
MPO Productions. Inc. since 1948, 
directed /,(/;/;< in the Window wliicli 
won the Academy Award for the 
finest one-reel theatrical film of 
1952. This film, one of a .series of 
seven films which Oser directed for 
20th Century Fox. also won first 
prize in its category at the Venice. 
Italy World Film Festival this past 
year. 

Ten Sponsored Motion Pictures 
Receive Scholastic Merit Awards 

I * Ten liusiness-spcjnsored motion 
pictures and one filmstrip were 
among the 30 16mm films and film- 
strips receiving awards for "out- 
standing merit" from Scholastic 
Magazine, a classroom teacher pub- 
' cation. Presentation of the awards 
' was to take place at the Town Hall 
Club in New York City on May 6. 

The ten award-winning informa- 
tional films sponsored by business 
were as follows: The Diesel Story 
(Shell Oil Co.) : The diiPont Story 
(E. I. duPont de Nemours Co.); 
Fallen Engle and Ciant oj the North 
I P. Lorillard Co.1 : Food as Chil- 
dren See ll (General Mills) : Green- 
tree Thoroughbred (Greentree 
Stud I : Powering America's Prog- 
ress I Bituminous Coal Institute) ; 
Opportunity U. S. A. (Investment 
Bankers Association) ; A Story oj 
Research I duPont I : and Your 
Money Is What You Make It (Na- 
liimal .Association of Manufac- 
turers! . 

The sole industry - sponsored 
35nnn filmstrip among the top ten 
in the classification was Petroleum 
in Today's Living (American Petro- 
leum Institute). 

Ajnong the classroom film pro- 
ducers accorded honors were En- 
cyclopaedia Britannica Films for 
// Takes Everybody to Build This 
Land and People Along the Missis- 
sippi: \ oung America Films for 
The Outsider and Speech: Conduct- 
ing a Meeting. The High Wall, spon- 
sored by the Anti Defamation 
League of B'nai Brith and Fears of 
Children (Mental Health Film 
Board) were other winners. 

The Story of Time, an English- 
sponsored production distributed 
in the L . S. by Cornell Films was 
aUn a Ifjiinn award winner. 5? 



Top Honors to Crawley Films at 
Sfh Annual Canadian Film Awards 
■>f I he sound motion picture Im- 
mediate Action produced by Craw- 
ley Films. Ltd. for the Toronto 
Slock F.xchange was given a first 
award in the non-theatrical spon- 
sored film classification at the Fifth 
Aimual Canadian Film .\wards 
ceremony held Thursday evening 
April 30 in Montreal's Avenue 
Theatre. The top award marked the 
fifth consecutive year a Crawley 
film has received this signal honor. 
Honorable mentions were given 
Calgary Stampede, produced bv Da- 
lart Productions. Ltd. of Toronto: 
Rogerslone. another Crawlev pro- 
duction for The Northern .Alumin- 
um Co., Ltd.: High Pouider, pro- 
duced by Associated Screen Stu- 
dios. Montreal, for the Canadian 
Pacific Railway. W(jn a special award 
as did Les Bouts D'Chou. a Craw- 
ley film showing creative expres- 
sion among young children. 

The National Film Board of Can- 
ada won a first award for Angolee 
in the non-theatrical "open' class. 
Honorable mentions in this group 
also went to the Film Board's The 
Son and Romance of Transporta- 
tion and to another Crawley film 
The Power Within. Hot Hickory 
won honorable mention for .\shley 
& Crippen. Ltd. of Toronto and for 
Dr. S. Copeland who produced 
Magic of the Tropics. L'.4ge du Cas- 
tor, a production of Film Board and 
Birds That Eat (Crawley I won 
special awards in the "open" group 
as did A Phantasy and Neighbours. 
both National Film Board produc- 
tions. 

The Roaring Game, a theatrical 
short subject and Canine Crimebust- 
ers. in the same class, both won 
honorable mentions for -Associated 
Screen Studios. 59" 

Boston Festival Juries Name 1 1 
Pictures for Awards on May 26 

* EIe\en sound motion pictures 
were selected for first and second 
place awards by audience juries at 
the 3rd Annual Boston Film Festival 
held in that city on May 2. 

Formal presentation of all awards 
will be made at a dinner to be held 
Tuesday evening. May 26 at the 
Sheraton Plaza Hotel. Dr. Paul Wag- 
ner, executive director of the Film 
Council of America, will lie guest 
speaker on that occasion. j|f 



B U S I N E .S S SCREEN M .\ C A Z I .\ E 




just- 



A swinging pendulum is motion. So is a revolving turntable. 
Both frequently are the props of the window-display man, 
for he knows that motion attracts attention. 

However, motion— though capable of gaining attention — 
seldom gains the emotions; seldom, for example, generates 
desires, awe, compassion, conviction. In brief, 
motion alone rarely will transcend mere visual attraction and 
move the viewer to positive action. 

It is for this reason that Unifiims goes beyond physical 
movement to convey your film-message to your audience. 

Imaginative research, scripting and direction— and 
the imaginative useof sound — are brought into focus at Unifiims 
to stir and influence hopes, ambitions, prejudices, fears . . . 
to create moving pictures rather than simply motion pictures. 

The cost? Well, Unifiims' clients have been moved 
to express their gratification with the savings effected 
by Unifiims" economical production techniques. 

It costs you nothing, obligates you in no way, to hear more 
about Unifiims. Why not make a date by telephone . . . now. 



UNIFILMS, INC. 

NOT JUST MOT/ON PICTURES. BUT MOVING PICTURES 



146 EAST 47TH STREET 

NEW YORK 1"7. M.Y. 

MURRAY Hri_L B-9325 




225 SOUTH 15TH STREET 

PHIUADEI_PHIA 2. PA. 

KlMGSLEY s-eoi3 



N U M 11 t R 3 • VOLUME 14 



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Model 22 is a portable developing machine for 
16mm black and white, negative, positive or 
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tive temperature controls. Moderately priced. 



HOUSTON 
FEARLESS 



Today's demand for faster, better, more depend- 
able processing presents an excellent opportunity 
for local laboratories in every community. Hous- 
ton-Fearless equipment, standard of the motion 
picture industry in Hollywood and throughout 
the world for 20 years, makes it possible for you 
to offer processing service in your locality that is 
days and weeks ahead of "out of town" schedules. 
Houston-Fearless processing machines handle the 
entire job from camera to screen with each step 
under fully automatic control. Quality of work is 
unsurpassed. Take advantage of the need for this 
service in your community. Write for informa- 
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"World's largest manufacturer of 
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FOR BETTER SHOWS USE "THE AUDIO-VISUAL PROJECTIONISTS HANDBOOK" 

♦ Many large U. S. business firms now use the manual contains step-by-step lessons on good show- 
Audio-Visual Projectionist's Handbook to train nianship; sells at only $1.00 per copy, postpaid, 
employee projectionists. This graphic, illustrated Order today from Business Screen. Chicago 26. 



Department of Agriculture Covers 
TV Production at Conference 

♦ 1 he liasic luiictidMs in motion pic- 
ture produitioii were considered h\ 
more than 60 persons at a recent 
\M>rk conference held by the Motion 
I'irture Service of the Department 
of Agriculture, .\mong the delegates 
were extension workers from 19 
slates and Puerto Hica. and guests 
from Rrilnin. Finlanil. Panama and 
India. 

Dual purpose of the three day 
conference was to satisfy the interest 
in films generated by television and 
lo help agricultural film producers 
make full and effective use of the 
new medium. 

Four general areas of editorial 
responsibility were covered in one 
session. They were "professional 
presentation." defined as a smooth 
How of action: pace, which should 
lie building to a natural and con- 
\incing ending: relevancy between 
picture and sound: and the creation 
of audience interest. Several types 
of viewers and editing machines 
were set up for illustration aiul 
practice. 

Some of the common cinematic 
troubles, such as duplicated images, 
Here diagnosed, macrophotography 
was discussed, and the problems in- 
volved in shooting for television 
were explored in a session on basic 
photography. 

In the script session information 
films were described as '"visual and 
aural blends of subject matter, im- 
agination, many skills and good 
taste, mixed to fill particular needs." 
The script writer s contributions 
were considered, and the successful 
writer was said to "employ the 
magic of a good reporter, a good 
teacher, and a good showman." 

Other sessions were concerned 
with the directors job. the require- 
ments of a laboratory, and finally 
the importance of projection. To 
illustrate the last point a demon- 
stration of how not to give a show- 
ing was given — complete with loose 
loop, poor focus, improper sound 
level, scratched film and dirty aper- 
ture. This showed the importance of 
projection, and how the time, money 
and effort put into a finished motion 
picture can be wasted if this final 
step is neglected. 



It's Earl Pierce Who Heads 
Up Audio's Medical Division 

♦ Our t\ iKigraphcr's finger slipped 
last issue on page 60. Earl "Price" 
is. of course. Earl fierce, head of 
Audio Production's medical divi- 
sion, which is tiow completing two 
new films in an outstanding series 
of professional use pictures for the 
American Cancer Society. 



B l^ I N' E S S SCREEN M .\ G .\ Z I N E 




and that's all there Is to it! 



DULL PICTURES are visual double-talk. Like verbal double-talk, 
they confuse and annoy. But sharp, clear pictures, with or without 
words, are the most compelling medium of all. 

FOR 16 MM AUDIENCES of 100 or more people, there's only one 
way you can project sharp, clear pictures. That's with carbon-arc 
lighting ... 4 times brighter, Vi cheaper to operate than the next 
best source. And "National" carbon arcs are simple to oi>erate; 
safe, silent, steady burning. 

IF YOU USE or intend to use auditorium projection of 16 mm films 
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simple and economical way to add new vitality, color brilliance 
and realistic detail to your showings. 




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Pennsylvania Railroad Premiers 
Film for "Perfect Shipping Monffi" 
♦ Tlif premier sliowiiigs of The 
Breaking Point, new Pennsylvania 
Hailroacl training film produeed hy 
UNini.Ms, Inc.. coimicled witli Per- 
feel .Shipping Month ohserved dur- 
ing April. 

The 16min sound and cdlur |)ic- 
lure earned an Award (jf Merit from 
the National Committee on Films 
for Safety and was especially suited 
to the month set aside when shippers 
rarry (ju a cooperative campaign 
v.ith railroads for improvement of 
freight shipping and handling. 

The Breaking Point shows how 
the Pennsylvania's workers are em- 
|ilo\iiig greater care in the handling 
of hillions of dollars' worth of 
freight. Actual employes are shown 
working together to reduce loss and 
damage to goods in transit and in- 
t reasp safely to themselves. It shows 
the right way and the wrong way to 
do the job and emphasizes that the 
right way is the "good" way for 
■•-employes, shippers and the railroad. 

Wellington Fund Uses Sound and 
Slides for Shareholder Report 

♦ Slorkholders of Wellington Fund 
ill annual meeting in Philadelphia 
during the week of April 6 were 
given a preview of the newly-made 
sound and slide program — The 
Slury oj Wellington Fund — told 
in color with slides and a coordin- 
ated sound track. 

The visual presentation was pro- 
duced under the direction of A. J. 
Wilkins. vice president of Welling- 
ton Company. It is for use jointly 
with another visual program just 
completed by Wellington Companv 
called The Story of Mutual Funds. 

Mr. Wilkins said the two pictures 
complement each other. They were 
made, he added, for presentation be- 
fore social and civic groups of 
various kinds. "Never before has 
there been so widespread a public 
interest in mutual funds," the Wel- 
lington executive went on. "These 
pictures have been designed to sat- 
isfy that need by presenting in ar- 
resting fashion the story of the in- 
dustry generally and of Wellington 
Fund in particidar." 

News Reel Laboratory Will Film 
Day in Life of the Delaware Port 

♦ The life of a great sea port from 
morning until night will be the 
subject of a new film sponsored by 
the Delaware Port Authority and 
produced by News Reel L\bor.v- 
TORV. Philadelphia. 

The 16mm sound and color film 
will present the varied and colorful 
business of the Delaware Port, and 
the many ways in which the port is 



iiitiTd( |ii-iident on the surrounding 
iridu.str>. Kxecutive producer will be 
l-ouis W. Kellman. and the picture 
will be wrilleri and directed bv Paul 
W.-ndkos. 

New Film Shows Small Business 
How fo Seek Air Force Contracts 

* How small businessmen can se- 
cure Air Force contracts with a 
mininmm expenditure of money, 
time ami effort is the theme of Small 
Business and the Air Force, a new 
22-minute sound film. 

In the interest of building up a 
valuable source of potential sup- 
pliers for total mobilization or some 
similar emergency, the Air Force 
produced the picture to offer imme- 
diate help in communities through- 
out the nation. Further information 
on the film is available from the 
Small Business Officer at any one of 
the 24 regional offices of the Air 
Material Command. 

Four Canadian Paint Companies 
Sponsor Picture on Paint Research 

■^ The story of paint -- that thin 
film that protects and beautifies al- 
most everything today — is told in a 
new color film. Liquid Beauly. writ- 
ten and produced by Cr.\wley 
Films. Ltd. for four leading Cana- 
dian paint companies. 

The 20-minute film dealing with 
advances made in the paint indus- 
try through research was jointlv 
sponsored by the Canada Paint 
Company Ltd., Martin-Senour Com- 
pany Ltd.. the Lowe Brothers Com- 
pany Ltd.. and the Sherwin-Wil- 
liams Company of Canada Ltd. 

Liquid Beauty shows how ingredi- 
ents are ground, mixed and tested, 
and how quality control and re- 
search assure the consumer consis- 
tently high quality merchandise for 
both home and industrial use. De- 
signed for general public showings, 
the new 16mm film is available from 
any of the sponsors. 





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Business Screen 




489 Fifth Ave. 




New York 17, N.Y. 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZI.XE 



RCA's Two New 16mni 
ARC PROJECTORS 




for BICCER 

BRIGHTER 

MOVIES 



Here arc two profcssionjl arc pri>jtciors that 
assure big impressive pictures more brilliantly 
illuminated than ever. Ideal for industrial audi- 
toriums, lor colleges and unisersiiies. for large 
high schools, and for outdoor gatherings. 
They're built for portability and designed to 
^ive professional results. 

FAMOUS RCA "Thraod-Easy" FEATURE 

In liiese new arc projectors, you'll find all the 
ruggedness and dependability of the famous 
RCA "400" projector— PLIS RC;As "thread- 
eas)" film path. \Xith RCA's time-proved "400" 
mechanism and RCA arc projection you've got a 
combination \ou can depend on. 

For further information on the New RCA 
16-mm Arc Projectors, check with your RCA 
\'isual Products Distributor. 

NEW DESIGN FOR PORTABILITY 
The RC:A Arc Proiectur disassembles into ? 
easy-to-carry cases. It may be set up or taken 
down in less than five minutes. Supporting legs 
and connecting cables are stowed a>s'a\, ^^■hen 
not in use. in special compartments in the pro- 
jector stand, which also houses the powerful, 
carefully engineered. iS-watt amplifier. This 
amplifier may also be used with existing perma- 
nent public address or sound system. 




TNI COMPUn RCA UM Includes ihc 6n»l in 16- 
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Use Castle Films to "spice" 
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QUANTITIES LIMITED 

Here are a few companies regularly using 
Castle Films cartoons, sports, comedies and 

adventure subjects available at only $21.75 each in black and white-adding 

an entertainment "plus" to their own film programs. 

Schenley, Burton & Gallagher, Sinclair Oil, Standard Oil. 

General Motors Dealers, Coca Cola Dealers, Allis Chalmers 
Write for illustrated catalog describing more than 
200 one-reel movies offering great entertainment 



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and FEATURE Motion Pictures 

Five complete recordings of the following libranc. 

Paxton - Bosworth -Odeon 
Brull- Francis Day & Hunter 

Also the largest selection of sound effects records in 
existonce. Anything from o "cots meow to lion's roar" all on 

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Itlablithtd 1932 



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\\1I\TS \i;\\ |\ IMCTl KES 

Films to Ploy Dominant Role 

At Notional Nursing Convention 

* Mfti-rii films (III a w'uiv rango (if 
li(-allli iirdliliiiis Hill lie sliiiwn dur- 
ing tlif first ((Mneiilion of the Na- 
tidnal League f(ir Nursing in Cleve- 
land. Ohiu. June 22-26. The thor- 
oughness v\ith uhich motion pictures 
cover the health field, and the ex- 
tent to which films can be used in 
planning a coiutntion program are 
graphically illustrated in this pro- 
jected schedule. 

Among the subjects which films 
will cover are industrial health, pub- 
lic health nursing, mental health, 
poliomyelitis nursing, hospital ad- 
ministration, team relationships in 
nursing care, and the work of UN 
health teams. Comments of a guest 
speaker and audience discussion will 
follow each film showing. 

Nurses, members of allied pro- 
fessions, representatives of nursing 
service agencies, nursing educators 
and nursing "consumers" will par- 
ticipate in discussions, panels, round 
tables and dramatizations during 
the convention. Dr. Alan Gregg, vice 
president of the Rockefeller Founda- 
tion, will give the keynote address 
on "'The Opportunities Before Us." 

Registration is $5.00 for League 
members. $6.00 for non-members, 
and $1.00 for student nurses. Addi- 
tional information about the conven- 
tion can be obtained from the Na- 
tional League for Nursing. 2 Park 
Avenue, New York 16. 

Latest in Texaco Form Series 
By Audio to Feature Sheep 

* ."^hetp will be the subject of the 
eighth motion picture in the series 
of farm films to be produced this 
summer by Audio Productions, 
Inc.. for The Texas Company'. 

These half-hour movies in color 
are used by Texaco as the feature 
around which hundreds of local 
farm meetings are held each year 
in every State in the Union. While 
the films are built around a story, 
they also contain much authentic 
educational material on farm sub- 
jects which in the past have includ- 
ed chickens, apples, beef and dairy 
cattle, farm workshops and hogs. 
This year. Business Screen nom- 
inated Biukshol Goes to the Fair 
as the outstanding farm film pro- 
duced for an industrial concern. 

L. S. Bennetts, who has produced 
the series for Texaco, was in Den- 
ver in April making preliminary 
jilans to jihotograph the picture 
there later in the \ear. 



Socony-Vacuum Employee Film 
Assignment to Cote & McClone 

♦ Production has started at Gate 
AND McGlonk on a new imployce 
relations film for ihc Soidrn- 
\acuuni (Jil Coriipanv and its ma- 
jor alliliatis. 

The new film. I(iiliili\( h tilled 
WE. was written In Charlc. Palmer 
after an lo-monlh stud) of the com- 
pany's operations. Its purpose is to 
acquaint the 6.5.000 mendiers of the 
"Fiying Red Horse Famil\" with 
the far-flung operations of their 
company, both here and abroad. 

A six-month shooting schedule 
will cover about 15 states and up- 
wards of 20 foreign countries. A 
generous budget is said to have 
been allocated for the color pic- 
ture. It will be directed by Al Kel- 
ley, and John J. Hennessy of West- 
Marquis. Inc.. will act as associate 
producer. 

American Airlines' "Big Vacation" 
In Production by Dynamic 

♦ Dynamic Films, Inc. has begun 
production on its third film for 
American Airlines. Tentatively titled 
The Big \ acation. it will cover the 
beautiful California vacationland 
areas. 

The new motion picture is part 
of the airlines expanding film pro- 
gram aimed at making available to 
TV stations and non-theatrical audi- 
ences entertaining and uimsual 
travel films. 

The Big I acalion was i\ ritten b\ 
Tom Hughes and will be directed 
by Nathan Zucker. Dynamic said 
it plans "to produce a exciting and 
dramatic film that will be a far 
cry from the sun-sinks-in-the-west 
school of travel films." 

Chrysler Uses Theatre Playlets 

In Announcing New 1953 Plymouth 

♦ Currently on display in theatres 
throughout the world are a series of 
1 / theatre playlets produced in col- 
or b) Sound Masters. Inc. for 
the Chrysler Corporation announc- 
ing the 1953 Plymouth. 

The films were shot in the De- 
troit area, and many scenes were 
made at picturesque Granbrook 
School on the Booth estate. 

At the same time William F. 
Grouch of .Sound Masters was also 
directing a series of television film 
commercials which were used for 
one day only in announcing the 
new Plymouth. The\' were shown 
only on Dave Garroway s TV show 
"Today. " and the company said 
that even with such limited usage 
the effects saleswise were excellent. 

BUYERS USE BUSINESS SCREEN 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



CFI 



one of lite largest film laboratory organizations in 
the ti'orld . . . and best qualified to do your film 
processing because it fulfills the 



basic requirements: 




all $ m have in full measure at CFI 
all ^ are traditional at CFI 



OUR NEW 16mm LABORATORY BUILDING 





This is the first large, fully-equipped, 
professional laboratory ever built for the 
processing of 16mm film exclusively. It 
incorporates every advanced facility for 
attaining the finest possible quality in 
16nim black & white and color. 



In El-fry Field. One !\ume Stands Out. In Film Laboratories. It's . . ■ Ci I 



CONSOLIDATED FILM INDUSTRIES 

A DIVISION Of REPUBLIC PICTURES CORP. 



959 Seivard Street. Hollywood 38, California • phone: HOIIyuood 91441 
1740 Broadivay, Neiv York 19, t\ . i. • phone: J l! 6-1700 



NUMBER 3 • V O L i: .M E 14 • 1953 




OH, NO, Mr. Tompkins, 
when we say, 

>/ "COME 

PREPARED 
TO WORK" 

we mean: 

Come prepared to 
determine with us 
exactly what the 
film must ac- 
complish. 

Come prepared to 
evaluate the fresh, 
exciting ideas we'll 
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Come prepared to 
work closely with 
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Come prepared to 
have your film 
made a really 
effective film 
by 



Robert Davis 
Associates, inc. 

21 EAST 63rd ST., NEW YORK CITY 



Cleveland Business, Community Leaders Hear a Panel 
on Client-Producer Relations in Final Library Program 



* OiM- liur„lr,-,l nnd IUu-Ium hiisi. 
ness and coniniunity Icadrrs fmrn 
(llrvi'Iaiul and nearby Oliii) rilio 
Hero mendiors iif the audienci' cm 
April 27 at llir cunfluditig iiniprajn 
iif an eiglil-wcck fihn-lccluri' merit's 
presented In the Clexelanil Pulili<- 
l.ibrar). arranj^ed \n tlie lilirar\'s 
Film Dureau. 

To])ir of tlie final pnigrain was 
"Priidueer and Sponsor Respmi-i- 
i)ility in the Production of Motion 
Pictures' with 0. H. Coelln. Jr., 
editor and publisher of Business 
Screen, serving as moderator for 
an outstanding panel of experts 
from three representative fields — the 
agency, the sponsor and the pro- 
ducer. 

They Know the Business 
David G. Adam, manager of the 
FiRii. Television and Radio Depart- 
ment of Fuller & .Smith & Ross. Inc.. 
represented the agency viewpoint: 
H. F. Brown, manager of the Visual 
Aids Division, Shell Oil Company 
and Hugh C. Ralston, supervisor 
of motion pictures in the Office of 
Public Relations. Ford Motor Com- 
pany, represented the sponsor view- 
point. Ernest D. Nathan, vice-presi- 
dent. Caravel Films. Inc.: Robert 
E. Haviland. manager, Cinecraft 
Productions. Inc.: and L. T. Young, 
sales department. Wilding Picture 
Productions. Inc. ably presented the 
producers side of this important 
subject. 

Quincy Mumford. director of the 
Cleveland Library and host for the 
evening, gave a brief address of wel- 



Olii. 
(,ru, 
lion 
Ir 
the 
Beai 



I'd Sla 
lilni 

„l loll, 



Ain^ of the newly- 

iidard Oil Company of 

Freet/om's I* roving 

iHed the panel prescnta- 



iliarge of arrangements for 
entire series was Virginia 
I. head of the Library's Film 

Bureau, assisted by Elizabeth llun- 

adv of the Bureau staff. 



Audience a Big Factor 
Panel members spelle<l out the 
many important details which are 
essential to successful film produc- 
tion. The size of today's sponsored 
film audience, the many excellent 
processes and experienced facilities 
a\aila})le and the full cooperation 
necessary between client and pro- 
ducer for achieving resultful films 
were cited by the speakers. 

As a "pilot" program, this panel 
discussion was the first of its kind 
given to a representative commu- 
nity audience. Both panel members 
and audience representatives agreed 
that the important topic covered 
would be ideal program fare for a 
national advertising or agency as- 
sociation program or for any na- 
tional trade group considering the 
current and widespread business 
interest in commercial film produc- 
tion. 

Scheduled for Publication 
Papers of the various panel mem- 
bers are now being reviewed for a 
comprehensive report scheduled to 
appear in an early issue of Busi- 
ness Screen. R' 



Here's the Cleveland panel (left to right): Robert Haviland, Cinecraft 
(foreground) : Hugh Ralston, Ford; David Adam, Fuller & Smith & Ross: 
moderator Ott Coelln (standing). H. F. Broun. Shell: Ernie Nathan. Cara- 
vel; and L. T. Young, Wilding, (Cleveland Library Photo) 




BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 




BUSINESS TO USE 



>Q, 



Gi^CI^G 



TAPE RECORDING 

REVERE TAPE RECORDER — Takes dictation, records important meetings, 
speeches, inventory, production details! Reviews important points for sales or 
employee training. Permits sales staff to practice and improve sales tectinique. 
Doubles as on entertainer at company social affairs. 



Model T-700— Brings you performance ond high 
fidelity heretofore obtoinoble only in costly pro- 
fessional broadcast equipment. Exclusive index 
counter permits instont location of any port of 
recorded reel. Automotic "keyboard" controls. 
Full two hours play on each 7-inch reel of eros- 
able, re-osable tope. Complete with microphone, 
rodio attachment cord, 2 reels (one with topel 
and carrying cose $235.00 



TR-800 — Same as above with built-in 

radio $277.50 

Special Studio Models— Speed 7. SO 

T-10 — Complete with microphone, radio attach- 
ment cord, 2 reels (one with tape! and carrying 

case $235.00 

TR-30 — Some os above with built-in 

rodio $287.50 



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REVERE "16" SOUND PROJECTOR — Projects your soles story at its best! 
Brilliant, clear, natural picture and true "ttieater" tone. Lightweight and exceptionally 
compact — for easy portability from company to company. So easy to thread 
and operate — your beginning salesman will use it like an experti 
750-watt lamp brilliance; fast 2-inch F 1.6 coated lens. Complete with speaker- 
carrying case and cord, take-up reel, 1600' reel extension arm, instructions. $325.00 




SOUND MOVIES 

REVERE SOUND-MOVIE SYNCHRO-TAPE— Increases the volue of your 
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message to fit each new business situation. Make revisions quickly, easily. 
Revere Sound-Movie Synchro-Tape is especially designed to enable you to 
synchronize picture and sound perfectly. One 5 reel provides sound for 
800 feet of 8mm film or 1600 feet of I 6mm film. Complete with 
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AND SOUND EQUIPMENT 



REVERE CAMERA COMPANY 
CHICAGO 16, ILLINOIS 



NUMBER 3 • \ O L L .M E 11 • 1953 



31 



Portrait of o man losing his sole - 
Both soles in foct - 
This lad's worn out umpteen pairs of shoos 
racing around getting his film processed- 
Silly, isn't it? 
When he slows down for o moment, 
we'll tell him how his production work 
can oil be done af ONE location - 
WITH UNDIVIDED RESPONSIBILITY 
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e'll show him how he con save 
TIME — MONEY — WORRY 




^^laK» hnptttloH and metfnffng 



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at one address 

One or all available for your needs —.inquiries 
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Phone Hollywood 97205 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



T H 




OFFSCREEIV 



o%cz 



LATE NEWS EVENTS AT PRESSTIME 

Stereo Movie Coverage of Chicago Title Fight 
hy R. C. Wolff Crews Make Film History 
■♦f Wv Here there nhen the Slereii-Cine caineras 
of Raphael G. Wolff made fihii histor) hy taking 
three-dimensioiial motion pictures of the Marri- 
ano-Walcott world heavyweight title fight in Chi- 
cago on Friday. May 15. This is the first re- 
corded instance of a sporting event being filmed 
for connnercial release via .S-D. Although the 
hrevity of the fight was (erlainly a disappoint- 
ment to the producer, Nathan L. Halpern. there 
wasn't anything wrong with the stereo pictures. 

Tliree dual-camera units were used, two of 
them were modified Eclair Camerettes and one 
unit was a pair of Mitchells. These stereo .setups 
are also unique in their unusual portability. The 
Eilair units were set up at each side of the ring 
and the pair of Mitchells covered the entire arena 
from a vantage point about ,50 feet from ring- 
side. John Boyle, A.S.C. and a veteran camera 
director, supervised the cinematography. Three 
stereo engineers, one at each camera station, 
handled the important work of calculating inter- 
ocular and convergence for the camera crews. 

Tlie Stereo-Cine cameras arc the result of de- 
velopment work initiated by Ray WolfT back in 
1947. His cameras are currently doing major 
studio production work, including short subjects 
for Sol Lesser. 

The fight films were ordered from Stereo-Cine 
on that basis. They were processed in New York 
City immediately after the bout and were back 
in Chicago for viewing b\ Illinois Athletic Com- 
mission officials, sports writers and the manager 
of the ill-fated Mr. Walcott. This showing 
offered conclusive evidence of the full count 
given the loser at 2:25 minutes of the first round 
when he was knocked to the canvas by the strong 
right hand of .Marciano. 

Chicago -sports writers were enthusiastic about 
the stereo movies. The concensus was that this 
new technique might well bring a golden era for 
viewers of such events as basketball, boxing, etc. 
where close-up action parlicularlv lends itself to 
stereo technique. Q' 

Three L'lilily Comjxiiiv Films Cel limrds 
from Public llililies Atlvertising Assn. 
* This year's winners of the Public I tilitics Ad- 
MTtising Associations annual motion picture 
awards (classification 16 in this assmiation's 
media grouping! were announced after press- 
time but we did a little type-squeezing in order 
tr) tell you that the Ci>lumbia Gas .System. Inc. of 
New York: the Southern California Gas Com- 
pany of Los Angeles: and the ("ilizens Gas & 
Coke I tility of Indianapolis were adjudged as 
having the best public relations motion pictures 
submitted this year. 

Films are given a speiial media classification 
and judged by advertising executives on the basis 
of their techniial quality and public relations 
lalur to the sponsor. y' 




ff ' ell- filleil tables oj Festival liiiesls sh»uii 



Boston Announces Film Festival Awards 



EI.ICVEN .MOTION I'ICTIRKS received top awards 
on May 2 at the Third Annual Boston Film 
Festival, sponsored b\ the Film Council of 
Greater Boston and held as a full-day event at 
the .Sheraton I'laza Hotel in that city. First and 
second awards were made in four main classifica- 
tions plus a first award made in the field of re- 
ligious films, as a part of the adult education 
group. 

Four industry-sponsored motion pictures were 
among the award winners. In the field of '"indus- 
trv films'' a first award was given Scolly If ins 
Her If ings, produced by Gate & M<Gl(me for 
L'nited Air Lines. Second award in this group 
was given Out of the North, produced by Mt'O 
Productions for Nash Motors. 

First award in the field of "adult education'" 
films was given Dark Interlude, produced by tlie 
Newsreel Laboratory for the Overbrook School 
for the Blind. The film Miracle on Skis, pro- 
duced by George Kraska, received the second 
award in this class. 

Birds of the Prairie, produced by Martin 
Bovey Films for the Minneapi>lis Moline Imple. 
ment Company received a top award in the field 
of "classroom films." This honor was shared by 
Walt Disney's History of Aviation, as a first 
place tie. A Is for Atom, produced by John 
.Sutherland Productions for the (jeneral Electric 
Company, won the second place honors in this 
group. 

Final classification at Boston was for films on 
"the arts." First award in this group went to 
A Phantasy, produced by the National Film 
Board of Canada with second place honors 



shared by hnaj^es Medievales. produced by Wil- 
liam Novick and distributed by -A. F. Films, Inc. 
and The Story of Chinese Art. distributed by 
China Film Enterprises of America. 

All selections were based on weighted voting 
liv members of audience juries seeing the films 
selected from among some 2.50 entries. 

Presiding at the Festival luncheon was Coun- 
cil president Edward Palmer. New England Tele- 
phone and Telegraph Company. Reverend Cor- 
nelius Sherlock. Superintendent of Schools, 
Archdiocese of Boston, offered the invocation. 
High point of the affair was the talk by Dr. 
Arthur A. Allen and Dr. Peter Paul Kellogg of 
the Laboratory of Ornithology of Cornell Uni- 
versity, who were introduced by the Festival 
Chairman. .Mac Bougere. Radio Corporation of 
America. 

Choosing as their subject Stalking Birds with 
Color Camera and Microphone, these nationally 
famous ornithologists described their experiences 
in photographing bird life and in recording 
many varieties of sounds. They demonstrated 
w ith color slides and recordings various bird 
songs in high, medium, and low keys, as well as 
frog sounds, and the sound of a thunderstorm. 

On Tuesdav evening. May 26. 195.'i. announce- 
ment of First and Second ,\ward winners will 
be made publicly at an .Awards dinner at the 
Sheraton Plaza Hotel in Boston. In reiogni- 
tion of the fact that only films of highest quality 
were shown at the Festival, producers and spon- 
sors of all films used will be presented with 
( ither an .Award of Merit or a First or Second 
Award, such as 11 top films will get. 5f 



Offickrs a.M) (.lests at boston festival i.i ncheon included ll. to r.) Emile F. M'in. I . S. De- 
partment of Justice. Council treasurer. Alan F. Lvdiard. John Hancock Mutual Life Insurance Co.. 
Council vice-president: Mrs. Muriel C. Javelin. Boston Public Library. Council .secretary: Mac R. 
Bougere, Radio Corporation of America. Festival chairman: Dr. Arthur A. Allen, guest speaker: 
Edward II'. Palmer, \ew England Telephone & Telegraph Co.. Council president: Dr. Peter Paul 
Kellogg, guest speaker: John Broun, official city greeler: Moiisignor Cornelius Sherlock, superin- 
leiuleni nj I'nrarhinl Srh«itl<: an, I C-ituc Ritdimir. \'-ir Fn^land Film Service. Feslivnl ni-chairmnn. 



N I \1 H K R i 





PRODUCTIONS 



producing film for more than thirty years 
announces with pride the release of its latest film 

FREEDOM VALLEY 

(sixth* in a series of annual report films produced 
for PHILADELPHIA ELECTRIC COMPANY) 




y/ikXA^f^ through the ima g inative 

use of techniques which command 
audience attention . . . 



■..•■^ ~'^ ydiJii^ — through extending 







-■^\i utihzation, increasin g the audience 
potential of this film more than four 




..'""■w^* V^." . »'"i-»*-5« milhon without increasing budget 



^^k|>ti^ accomplished by the 

creative interpretation of 
progressive business thinking . . . 



We build value into your films . . . regardless of budget 
Write or Wire for Screenings 



PRODUCTION! 

a division of 

NEWS REEL LABORATORY 
1733 Sansom Street, Philadelphia 3, Pa. Rlttenhouse 6-3892 



*J*4<t^ ciT^txUtceY &ii live c<n*tki4»*^i^ lie \j€et^ 



Christophers Bring Story of Hogan's Comeback 
to the Screen in New Inspirational Sound Film 



■*■ Goifrr Hcii lliigaii. suppcirlcd l)v 
a million dollars worth of acting 
talent, has emerged this month as 
the star of a new 16mm inspiration- 
al sound film. 

Called Faith. Hope and Hogan, 
it was made on a golf course on 
the West Coast hy Father James 
Keller and his Christophers. Inc. 
The Christophers, a unique, world- 
famed group, holds that individu- 
als, working hard as individuals, 
can change the world into a bet- 
ter place. 

Courage for Handicapped 
Father Keller believes the Hogan 
story — one of the sports world's 
most amazing comebacks — will give 
courage to millions of people faced 
with handicaps. Hogan, nearly 
killed in a 1949 auto crash, came 
back from a hospital bed to regain 
his niche as one of the great golfers 
of all time. The film was shot with- 
out script. Father Keller's only ad- 
vice to Hogan was to sav "just 
whatever comes to mind." 

The master golfer more than held 
his own in the movie with such mas- 
ters of the ad lib as Bing Crosby, 
Bob Hope and Phil Harris. Others 
in the cast are homerun slugger 
Ralph Kiner and movie producer 
Bill Perlberg. 

Via Television and 16mm 
Perlberg, a millionaire movie- 
maker, played a spur-of-the-moment 
bit as Hogans caddy. All the ar- 
tists donated their talents for the 
movie, which was released on 75 
of the nation's television stations 
the latter part of March and will 
also be available in 16mm for print 
cost via the Christophers' New York 
ofEce. 

Hogan, in making the movie, told 
Father Keller that he was able to 
make his comeback by "just work- 
ing a little harder than he ever 
had before."' He also made a dis- 
closure that may come as quite a 



Stellar talent is pre- 
sented, as usual in thi.s 
latest Christopher 
sound film. Shown at 
ri^ht ( jrom I. to r.) are 
Boh Hope. Ben Ho^an. 
Father James Keller 
(founder of The Chris- 
tophers) and Bing 
Crosby in scene from 
"Faith. Hope and Ho- 
gan ' noir available in 
16mm version. 



shock to some of the nation's golf 
pros. 

"There are hundreds of golfers 
who are as good or better sholmak- 
ers than I on the course." Hogan 
said the difference between being a 
great golfer and a champion is "all 
bet^veen the ears." 

There's Hope and Crosby 

"In tournament play," says Ban- 
tam Ben, "'technical skill counts for 
30 percent of the game. The other 
70 percent is all management — be- 
tween the ears." 

Although Hogan gives the half- 
hour film an inspirational tone, 
it almost comes out a musical short 
— with Hope heavy on the comedy 
and Crosby likewise with the songs. 
Crosby sings two songs, "Accentu- 
ate the Positive" and "One Little 
Candle." both unofficial theme 
songs for the Christopher move- 
ment. 

Jack Denove, an ex-New York 
sports writer turned moviemaker, 
produced and directed the movie. 
Wire or write The Christophers. 18 
E. 48th St.. New York Cit>', for 
print cost and availabilitv. 

Be sure to ask about other Chris- 
topher films such as Government Is 
Your Business and Atomic Energy 
Can Be a Blessing, also available at 
print cost. , , » 

Supplemental List of Films Cleared 
For Television Now Available 

♦ The Committee on Medical Mo- 
tion Pictures of the American Med- 
ical Association has announced the 
publication of a supplement to the 
list of health education motion pic- 
tures cleared for use on television. 
This supplement lists 38 motion pic- 
tures which have been cleared for 
television use since publication of 
the original list in 1951. 

Copies may be obtained by writ- 
ing to the Committee on Medical 
Motion Pictures, American Medical 
Association, 535 North Dearborn 
Street. Chicago 10. 




B U S I N E .< S .< t: R E E N MAGAZINE 




ELECTRONIC FILM INSPECTION 






5^-'' 



'&* 



^t 



. . another important first for MODERN 

27 Modern film exchanges are now being equipped with the Harwald Inspect-O-Film. 

And so Modern again leads the way in adopting the most advanced equipment and 
methods for the distribution of sponsored films. 

The system-wide installation of electronic film inspection machines follows two years 
of continuous testing of this equipment in two Modern exchanges. During that time we 
found that the Inspect-O-Film caught even the smallest film defect, enabling our film main- 
tenance personnel to keep prints in top condition at all times. 

Our use of this equipment is important to audience and sponsor alike. The audience 
can be sure that films from Modern will come to them without defects. The sponsor can be 
sure that prints distributed by Modern will have a longer life and that his investment in 
prints will be safeguarded. 



MODERN TALKING PICIORE service 

NEW YORK: 45 Rockefeller Plazo • JUdson 6-3830 

CHICAGO: 140 East Ontario Street • DEIoware 7-3252 

PHILADELPHIA: 243 South Broad Street • KIngsley 5-2500 

LOS ANGELES: 612 South Flower Street • MAdlson 9-2121 



Modern alone oflfers electronic film inspection as a regular part of 
its service at no increase in price. This is another reason why you 
should consult Modern about the more effective distribution of 
your sponsored film. 



NUMBER 3 • V O I. I M t; M 






Public Relations 



I Pictures by Audio 






V 



■ — as »""; 



20 min^- 



■■■^■"au ednca.ic.l film for ^^""''j'r^iZ ^^^ 
review o( timelceeping devices and answering inc m 



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20 mins. 
•■FIRST IN FLIGHT" , .,„„i„g „l,b .he WrigM 

A '''*'°"j ;I,dfnTw°"h loday-s latest planes 
Brothers and enaiiiB 



.rK A**EAD ■ |.,e»i 



2^ rnins. 



voc 



ahead;; 



Th« J'j;„n P'°* 



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,,.. -ess ol """"'^nialio''- 



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. .EARCH EO«,„ „i= ."-"" 
The storj; ot >" 
,,'oduction- 



oi:'''*„"*ol '^ 



,v tS *" t. s5i»:>>'°,!'\d.n6 



wins- 
„ oris'"** 





'■THE LONG ROAD' ,nd „rh. 
Series of - °""" 



for-^.he"„iT rnr„"„i?r''""".-' -f »">,ee , ■ "° """'• 
during I9JS to J9°i " "'"' ='Sr.col„„,| fieijs;";';?jf,;'JJ 



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•>■ and the „;,„„„ "S 'o Ihc individual' 






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car. "''■'1,31 







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,^ A sTO»'^„vic.°y„.^>^^>ou« 

,t5C''"*tra'"^ "^^ 



''°:i« ?SA ?"'»" 

Send for 
"A FEW FACTS ABOUT AUDIO ' 



AUDIO PRODUCTIONS, I IM C 

PRODUCERS OF MOTION PICTURES 

r,30 N'lNTH AVENUE • FILM CENTER rUII.DlXG • NEW YORK, X. 



BUSIIESS SClEEl 



. M 



N 



Films and the New Administration 

CAPITOL COMMENT 0.\ FILM PLAINS, ADVISORS AND POSTAL RATKS 



WHERE DO YOU AND I and the power- 
ful medium of films with which we work 
fit in the new picture of official. Repub- 
lican Washington in this first critical year of a 
new administration? 

Certainly the active role of citizenship which 
we exercised last fall has given way to a passive 
state of half-optimism, half-pessimism as the full 
complexity of our world and domestic problems 
has been thrust upon Mr. Eisenhower and his 
new appointees. We no longer expect the "mir- 
acles" of November but we had better do our 
utmost as good Americans to achieve some of the 
improvements we voted for. 

For our part, there are immediate and inter- 
esting sidelights out of Washington this month 
with which film people are directly concerned. 
There is also the aspect of active citizenship as 
il relates to our special field oj informational 
jihns. There is finally the matter of "'special 
interest" and a strictly personal reaction to the 
plea for special privilege in the matter of lower 
postal rates on film shipments. 

Item: The International Information Ad- 
ministration in the V. S. Department of State 
has been talking to the Screen Directors' 
Guild about the hire of 28 noted directors at 
the minimum weekly scale of S550 per. These 
Hollvwood notables are supposed to do a 
series of "documentary, propaganda films"' for 
the campaign of truth to expose Communist 
falsehoods. 

Opinion: .\ more incompatible set of circum- 
stances could hardly be imagined than to put 
such a tremendously important mission on such 
a "big name" level at a "bargain rate." to be 
done as "studio contracts and time permit." 

WTiat a far cry this is from the kind of sin- 
cerity and simplicity our friends abroad deserve 
from us! If there is the slightest truth to this 
twice-confirmed story, it should be vigorously 
opposed if only to save the taxpayer from a 
sheer waste of funds. We are glad to report, 
however, that Dr. Robert L. Johnson, admin- 
istrator of the IIA, is said to be enlisting the 
"active cooperation of the entire motion picture 
industry." 

Let us say for the time being that the motion 
picture industry is also represented in New \ork, 
Boston, Philadelphia. Pittsburgh, Detroit. Chi- 
cago. St. Paul, and points west other than Holly- 
wood. When the entertainment industry gives 
itself those .Academy .\wards it inc ludes an item 
called "short subjects" but when these have been 
shown abroad at places like Edinburgh and Ve- 
nice, not one of the illustrious directors named 
has ever had a factual film screened. 



Item: The Kiplinger \\ ashington Letter re- 
cently gave us businessmen a real chiding for 
"failing to work with the gov't administrator 
on rules and regulations . . . they won't come 
to W'ashington . . . won't bother to present 
their views, etc." 

Opinion: In this business we knou what's 
happening and some of the "top brass " in the 
new administration are equally at fault in this 
instance. They find it hard to forget that gov- 
ernment needs the cooperation of all its citizens. 

This medium of motion pictures and related 
visual aids is vitally important to a number of 
our Federal agencies and some of them spend a 
lot of time and money working with it. To the 
credit of the Roosevelt people, they reached out 
and asked Americans in all walks of life to come 
in and share their problem, to help with it and 
few expected payment. 

This is the sobering and vitally important re- 
minder we lay before our new government. Re- 
move the price tags on your requirements and 
permit your fellow citizens to exercise the highest 
privilege of an American . . . to give the tithe of 
his experience and special skills as you find need 
for them an\ where in government where the job 
can be done better in the national interest. 

There is a big job to be done by films in 
the Post Office Department, throughout the 
Defense establishment, in Agriculture and In- 
terior and in Mrs. Hobby's vast domestic 
structure. 

There is no need to extend the bureaucracy to 
get fullest measure from this powerful medium 
of idea communication. Advisory committees and 
individual consultants can be drafted from the 
ranks of our executives. They have only one 
mandate: to do what is best for the country, 
though it may not be necessarily best for their 
personal interest. No good citizen would do less, 
especially in this critical period. 

Item: A bill to apply book rates to the ship- 
ment of educational motion ])ictures is pro- 
posed. The support of all nontheatrical film 
users is being solicited to gain its passage and 
the resulting economic benefits to film uses. 

Opinion: We share the view that non-profit 
organizations such as our schools and churches, 
medical societies, health groups should have this 
aid so that their films may do a better job for 
all concerned. But no commercial or business 
sponsor should lift a finger on his own behalf for 
this measure. Instead, we ask only that the Post 
OITice Department improve its service of han- 
dling and delivery and offer our full cooperation 
to that extent. g' 



YOUR 1953 CALENDAR 
OF AUDIO-VISUAL EVENTS 

Film Festivab. \^"orkshops and Meetings 
of Interest to Film Sponsors and Users 

MAY 

May 22: .Annual Stamford fConn.i Film 
Festi\"al, sponsored by the Stamford 
Film Council, 'entries closed March 25). 

JUNE 

June 17-18: Sixth Annual Cleveland 
Film Festival. Hotel Carter, Cleve- 
land Ohio. Screenings of sponsored and 
educational motion pictures during first 
two-day event with entries in 15 cate- 
gories scheduled to receive "Oscars ' as 
top selections of audience juries. Screen- 
ings deadline was April 9. 

June 19-21: Pre-Conference Audio- Vis- 
ual Workshop of the American Li- 
brary Association. On the campus of the 
University of Southern California. Los 
Angeles. Registration fee So. Write Irv- 
ing Lieberman, School of Librarianship, 
University of California, Berkeley 4, 
Calif, for details. 

AUGUST 

August 1-5: National Audio-Visual Con- 
vention and Trade Show. Hotel Sher- 
man. Chicago. Joint meeting with mem- 
bers of the Industrial Audio-Visual Asso- 
ciation tentatively scheduled August 4. 

August: Edinburgh and \ enice Inter- 
of more than 125 maimfacturers, pro- 
ducers, and distributors of audio-visual 
materials in more than 32.000 square 
feet of air-conditioned exhibit space. 
Other organizations participating include 
Educational Film Librarv .Association. 
Catholic .Audio-Visual Association and 
the Film Council of America. 

August: Edinburgh and Venice Inter- 
national Film Festivals. U. S. film en- 
tries cleared by the Film Council of 
America. 

OCTOBER 

October 13-15: .Annual Fall Meeting of 
the Industrial Audio-\ isual .Associa- 
tion, Pittsburgh. Program Chairman, 
Ray Roth, U. S. Steel Corp. 

NOVEMBER 

November 1 : Entries close for the 1954 
Freedoms Foundation .Awards, which 
include 16mni molion pictures. Write 
Freedoms Foundation. Valley Forge, Pa. 
for entry forms and award details. 

Editor's Note: How do you like this new 
special feature? The Film Events Calendar 
will be a regular service in all future issues. 
You are invited to submit data for possible 
listing in this department. 



NUMBER 3 • \0LIME 14 • 1 'i ,i 3 



37 



Business Film Execiitivos Coiweni' tit Clilraiio 



lAVA Holds Seventh Annual Convention 

MKMBKHS OF INDISTKIAL ArDlO-VlSlAL ASSOCIATION ELECT LEO BEEBE AS 
PKESIDE-NT. AWARD MEKIT I'LAQIES DURING EVENTFIL S-DAY SESSION 



MEMBERS of the Industrial 
Audio - Visual Association, 
national association of executives 
witliin industry concerned with 
audio-visual connnunication, have 
named Leo Keebe. Ford Motor Com- 
panv. as president-elect. Mr. Beebe. 
who succeedi^ Pan Rochford. Stand- 
ard Oil Company of New Jersey, the 
retiring chief executive, was elected 
at lAVAs seventh annual conven- 
tion held at the Del I'rado Hotel in 
Chicago on April 28. 29 and 30. 

Tom Hope. General Mills, is first 
vice-president of lAVA for the 1953- 
54 term: Joseph Schieferly, Stand- 
ard Oil I N.J. I second vice-president. 
Don Steinke. Dow Chemical Com- 
pany, lAVA's secretary; and John 
Hawkinson, Illinois Central Rail- 
road, lAVA's treasurer, were re- 
elected to serve third terms. 

Regional Directors Named 

Regional director-at-large for the 
new year included Fred McMullen 
I Hardware Mutual Ins. Co.) for the 
northern region: Frank Rollins 
(Squibb & Sons) eastern region: 
William Cox ( Santa Fe Railway ) 
central region: Richard Conewav 
I Humble Oil I southern region: and 
\^ illiam Bailey iMytinger & Cassel- 
herry I western region. 

Members of the Advisory Council, 
heading principal committees of 
lAVA in 1953-54 are: membership 
chairman. Al Lytle (Raytheon) ; 
1954 program chairman. John Pow- 
ers (Illinois Belli: fall 1953 pro- 
gram chairman. Ray Roth ( U.S. 
Steel) : publicity chairman, William 
RejTiolds (Ohio Bell) : project 
chairman, Frank Brown (Shell 
Oil) : technical chairman. Walter 
Burton (Minneapolis Honeywell): 
constitution chairman. Bill Pratt 
(.AT.&T.): past presidents' chair- 
man, Dan Rochford: and historian. 
James Craig ( General Motors) . 





Retiring Prksidf.nt Dan Rochford 
(left above) receives service plaque 
from past president Gordon Biggar 
of lAVA. 

Fourteen new members were ad- 
mitted to JAVA membership during 
the annual meeting just concluded. 

Practical demonstrations of ex- 
hibit techniques, three-dimensional 
motion picture and slide production, 
magnetic tape reproduction, disc 
recording, loop film technique, 
script preparation, t.v. commercial 
production ideas, company film dis- 
tribution and Visualcast and over- 
head projection methods were 
among the principal topics on the 
well-filled annual program agenda 
arranged by Charles Shaw ( Armour 
& Co.). chairman of the 1953 pro- 
gram committee. Other members of 
the program committee included 
central regional chairman John 
Powers and past president R. P. 
Hogan (Kraft Foods 1. 

The annual program was conclud- 
ed with a practical demonstration 
tour of Bell & Howell's Chicago 
manufacturing facilities at which 
lAVA members saw how audio and 



Hospitality Hour during 
lAVA's annual meetings at 
(Chicago's Del Prado Hotel 
brought together (left to 
right) members Hugh Ral- 
^lon (Ford): Mike Ritt 
! ('ombined Insurance) ; 
mil Reynolds (Ohio Bell) 
and Ed Purrington (Ford). 



visual materials arc applied in vari- 
ous (Icparlnii-ntal functions in that 
company. 

Receives President's Plaque 

In a traditional ceremony during 
lAVA's annual banquet, held this 
year in the atmospheric surround- 
ings of Founders" Hall of the Saddle 
& Sirloin Club of the Stock Yards 
Inn. retiring president Dan Roch- 
ford received the presidents" plaque 
honoring his contributions to the or- 
ganization. Gordon Biggar. director 
of public relations for the Shell Oil 
Company and a past president of 
lAVA. made the presentation. 

Earlier in the three-day program. 




Past Presidknts Gordon Biggar 
(left) and Dan Rochford t right) 
are shown above ivith lAlA re- 
gional director Dick Coneuay, pride 
of the Lone Star state. 

three long-time members of the or- 
ganization were honored by the 
Service award. Plaques commemor- 
ating their services will be given to 
Don Steinke and John Hawkinson 
for their consecutive terms of office 
as secretary and treasurer, respec- 
tively, and to 0. H. Coelln. Jr.. pub- 
Ksher of Business Screen, one of 
the founders of the organization in 
19-16 and program chairman for 
both the 1951 and 1952 annual 
meetings. 

Hear About Scripts, 3-D 
Two of the many interesting 
events during the annual program 
were Oeveste Granducci's luncheon 
speech on April 29 "How to Get the 
Most Out of Your Script Writer " 
and Floyd Ramsdell's illustrated 
talk on "'Third Dimension and Its 
Promise"" gixen later on that dav. 




KiiUTs K. P. Ho&AN (left 
above) is shown with past presi- 
dent Bill Bastable (Swift) and 
Shell public relations' chief 
Gordon Biggar al lAl A. 

Mr. Granducci's experience as a 
professional scripter «hose organi- 
zation has served both producers 
and sponsors for man\ \ears. gave 
his remarks a hard-hitting practical- 
ity. The many contributions which 
business film script writers can make 
toward successful productions were 
enumerated. Their dependence on 
complete frankness, on thorough co- 
operation within the sponsor's or- 
ganization, and in follow-through 
during actual production were cited 
by the speaker. 

Tells 3-D Film Problems 

Flovd Ramsdell is a veteran East- 
ern producer of industrial films and 
a pioneer in three-dimensional film 
equipment and techniques. The dif- 
ficulties currently besetting Holly- 
Mood film companies «ere illustrat- 
ed H ith particular emphasis on the 
lack of standards and inadequate 
equipment often being emploved. 

Important emphasis was given the 
extremely close tolerances required 
for accurate focus in all three- 
dimensional production. Standard 
equipment was not deemed accept- 
able for professional production, ac- 
cording to the speaker, who pointed 
out that both camera and projection 
equipment had to be especiallv 




\l u I II I Ml Ml;l ,;. i.,l,.u are 
r.aa \larlrr ilrfi) oj the Chrysler 
Corporation and D. G. TreichJer of 
the Socony-1 acuum Oil Company 
(M). (Business Screen photos I 



38 



BUSINESS SCREEN M A G A Z I .N E 



adapted in order to fulfill husiness' 
ixiMKtations, particularly in the field 
of nidlion picture productiun. 

Another special demonstration on 
the program was ■"Tlie Seminar 
Looped Film Training Technique" 
as applied in recent Socony-Vacuum 
Co. films and other uses. Robert 
Dakir. Seminar Films, New York 



of Alcoa, International Harvester. 
I niled .Airlines and many others 
were visited iluring the tour. 

This special program event was 
concluded with a visit to the (Chi- 
cago Area .\ircraft Warning Filler 
Center located in the museum liuilil- 
ings. 

"Let's Look at Color" an illuslral- 



IAV\ MTMRFRS VISIT MISFI \I OF SCIFNCF v1 IMMSTKV 




A ()l lliMi Till 11 (If ( MK M.il'- \ll >M \I UK >( U M I v\ 1\I>1 ^ I in Id oh- 

.vcric till- mam inuliu ami i uuii/ Uclmujues ua.i an 1. 41 .1 cuniention 
event. In the center jorejiround above are (I to rl A. I'. Yunlser, (III. 
Bell): Bill Reynohh (Ohio Bell): John Pouers I III. Bell): D. G. Treich- 
ler (Socony): arnl Louis Goodman (Pan-American World Aincays). 



City made this' presentation in an 
c\ening program on April 21!. 

\ guided lour of the many visual- 
ized exhibits at Chicago's famed 
Museum of Scii'nie and Industry 
was one of the oulslanding special 
event.s. Following a luncheon ad- 
<lres.s by I). M. McMasler. director 
of the Museum. lAV A members vis- 
ited the nearb\ building where a 
nnriad of audio and visual exhi- 
bition techniques were explained un- 
der the supervision of Mr. McMas- 
ter and other Museum oflicials. Film 
theatres and motion picture exhibits 

lO.W Mkmbkr.ship Chairman is 
Raytheon's At Lyile. shoirn in the 

urr hel.m. 




ed talk by Phillip M. Chamberlain. 
Kastman Ki>dak Company: "\our 
Voice Is Vou" a live demonstration 
technique presented by Sabina Mor- 
risey. Illinois Hell Telephone Com- 
pany representative; and "How to 
Increase the Kffectiveness of TV 
Commercials" a talk by Charles 
Standard of the National Broadcast- 
ing (!i>mpan\ were other contribu- 
tions to the I AV \ annual program. 

Prize Nash Film Shown 
Numerous film showings were 
featured. Op<-ning event on the pro- 
gram was a showing of Nash 
Motors' Out oj the .\orth. deemed 
by many as the "film of the year." 
()|H-ning kevnote of the meeting was 
deliv.-red by lAVA mend.er <). H. 
Coelln, Jr. who delivered a challeng- 
ing address on "What's Aheail for 
Business Film S|H>nsors." 

Practical demonstrations on ta[)e 
anil flisr tivhniqui~< were made by 
llolHTt Van IWhren. Minnesota Min- 
ing & Manufacturing Co. who illus- 
Iraletl new ideas on ".Sound Kcvord- 
ing on Ta|ie and Film" and by Jo«- 
Wells, HCA Victor Division reprc- 
«cnlativr whti prrsentc-d "Disc Rc- 

I r o N T I \ f r n on i- a r. f. 6 2 i 




At a Ml sKl M l-II \1 MHp\\1S(. lirlr ' tiilf -rniillil . I. In r.l .1. U . MnrriMin 

I Socony): Louis Coodn\an lI'AAl: Waller Burton (Minn. Honeyuell) : 
others in backjiround include Jos. .'^chieferly (Esso): Gordon Bif:par 
(Shell): O. H. Peterson (Standard Oil. Ind.l: Al Lytle (Raytheon): 
Frnnii Rollins iSquibl,): Tom Hope (General Mills): Dan Roihjord 

f -. ( 'i^- ■lir film technique icas demonstrated. 




As I). M. MiMaSTKR. DiRKCTllK OK MlsKlM oK >MKN( K & 1m>L.STKV 
explains (extreme rif:hl. uilh hand upraiseil ) lAI .4 memlters f:el e\i>erl 
counsel on mmlern exhibit techniques involving both audio and visual 
media durinfi fiuided visit throufih the Museum's many halls in ChicofO. 



Among lAl A Miseim Visitors Shown Bklow are Paul Pelrus (So- 
cony): Marshall Barnes ( Bemis Bap): Harvey Plants (Air Reduction); 
Glenn Rohrlmch (Deere & Company ) and al extreme rifhl, H. F. Broun 
(Shell Oits visual aids manager) and .1. L. Morri.^on ( Socony-l aeuum I . 



N I M H h; K I 





Itlras far ) our F.mpliiyn' Film I'miirnn 



"Inflation" helps clarify public undersland- 
ing of the economic dangers involved for all. 

EMPl.OYF.E FILM PROGRAMS for both plant and 
office workers continue to gain favor with 
11 S. business. These showings are usu- 
ally held on a ""Weekly Movie Day" basis at noon 
hour or between shifts. The use of industry- 
sponsored films has been a major factor in build- 
ing these programs but other sources help sup- 
plement and enrich the emplovee program. 

For authoritative information on subjects of 
national interest, for example, there are the 
ready-made sound films of Encyclopaedia Brit- 
annica Films. For news, sports, cartoons such 
sources as United World (Castle Films I and 
Walt Disney films are suggested. They're com- 
paratively inexpensive and give real ""balance" 
to any plant show. Here are some specific film 
ideas for the program planner: 

EB Films" New Film on '"Infjation" 

■¥ Inflation is a problem which both employees 
and management are definitely concerned with 
but they dont ahvavs understand its cause or 
cure. The EBFilm Inflation defines the situation 
and explains it in terms that anyone can under- 
stand. 

A war or defense crisis brings about infla- 
tion, the film explains, because the supply of 
monev is increased at a time when there are 
fewer goods on the market. The effective cures 
mentioned are measures which decrease the mon- 
ley supply while increasing productivity. This 
17-minute color film may be purchased for 
SIOO.OO or rented from any regional EBFilm 
library. 

Competition and Big Business, also produced 
bv EBFilms. anaUzes the relationship of big 
business to competition. The film places big 

Co.MEDY SHORTS featuring Abbott & Coslello are 
available for plant movie day programs. 




Film Fare for Employee Showings 

i;()()i) Dl.SCl SSKJN ITEMS OH WIDE VAIilE'l^ OF EoW .<;(»,S 1 .'^llOHl.S ANAIEABLE 



business in its proper perspective alongside other 
forms of enterprise, and considers its bearing on 
entrv into the market and technological prog- 
ress. The problem of monopoly is discussed in 
terms of public interest and social responsibility. 
Prints of this 20-minute color film sell for 
SI 70.00. It may also be rented for preview. 

Two Encyclopaedia Britannica Films released 
last year help fill the almost continuous need 
for new training material on human relations 
in business. Office Courtesy and Office Team- 
work both dramatize office situations which re- 
quire thoughtful action. 

Techniques for meeting and working with peo- 
ple both in and out of the company, and the 




Colorful cartoons such as the "Woody Wood- 
pecker" series help lighten the noon hour screen. 

art of meeting "face to face" over the telephone 
are effectively explained in Oj^ce Courtesy. In 
addition the importance of courtesy and thought- 
fulness is pointed up. and the employee is shown 
how his attitude can have considerable effect 
on the company's business. 

Cooperation, a keystone in any business or- 
ganization, is revealed as the important basis 
for relationships between employees in Office 
Teamwork. Representative situations illustrate 
the manv times when teamwork is necessary, 
and demonstrate the effect cooperation, or the 
lack of it. can have on company morale and 
business. 

Each film is 12 minutes long and is avail- 
able in black and white. S50.00, or color. 
SIOO.OO. Prints may be rented from any EBF 
library. For the address of the one nearest you 
«ritt the home office. 1123 Central Avenue. 
Wihnette. Illinois. 

Sports and News on Castle Releases 

■¥ United World Films. Inc. provides short films 
on sports adventure and news which give a lift 
to film programs that may be long or overly seri- 
ous. Besides football parades and films of cham- 
|>ionship fights, there are titles on boat and auto- 
mobile racing, water stunts, rodeos and an array 
of thrill-seekers of all types. 



Fishing Thrills and Fishing Fun are two fihns 
on a subject of wide interest. They provide 
scenes of the kind of sport that working men 
don't often get over a week end. Coming at the 
end of a program that may have been heavy on 
education or advice, these short subjects are 
invaluable for "balance" in the film program. 

Short Newsreel Fills Out Programs 

News Parades and Historic Films offer ma- 
terial that can often tie in closely with the 
theme or purpose of the featured motion pic- 
ture. Neus Parades are available for every year 
since 1938, including 1952. They treat the head- 
lines of the vear and graphically demonstrate 
the urgency of many situations. 

The MacArihur Report. Crisis in Korea, Vic- 
tory over Germany, and Japan's Surrender are 
factual films of general interest that audiences 
appreciate. In the same way. films of famous 
people, places and events almost fifty years ago 
can bring back memories that point up the main 
idea of the program. 

For purely entertaining interludes in film pro- 
grams. United World's Castle Films include color 
cartoons of Woody Woodpecker. Andy Panda. 
Mighty Mouse and many others. They also have 
live action shorts starring Abbott and Costello 
and W. C. Fields. 

These shorts can round out a film program 
and often make it more effective. Most United 
World tit.es which fill this need are available in 
silent editions for S9.75 or sound de luxe edi- 
tions for .S21.75. 

For a complete catalog of these and other 
United World subjects write the company at 
144.1 Park Avenue. New York 29 or call your 
nearest photographic dealer or film library. 

Walt Disney Subjects Are .\vailable 

"k From the magic pen of Walt Disney have come 
cartoon subjects holding a unique place in the 
history of motion pictures, and award-winning 

LaI'GHTER EASES TENSION along the production 
lines — use cartoons like And\ Panda. 




BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 




BUSINESS SCRE 



""Competition and big blsiness"" is ihe tide oj 
a new EB Films' sound film noiv available jor 
business audience groups on a preview rental or 
outright purchase basis, (see article) 

live action films which won hiin widespread 
acclaim. Many of his productions are available 
in 16mni and as part of any film program they 
can add the touch that changes "just another 
movie" to a ""real show." 

Three of the factual reports on the human 
and funnv side of wild animals from Disney s 
True-Life series are available for non theatri- 
cal showings. 

Seal Island is a story of the intimate family 
life of seals on the Pribilof Islands in the Bering 
Sea. Each summer these polygamous seals re- 
turn to the mist-enveloped reefs to battle for 
wives and raise families. Bull seals, bachelors, 
cows and cubs, all assume human-like places 
in the island society as the story develops in 
plot-like fashion from strictly candid scenes. It 
niav be rented from Association Films. Inc. or 
from \^'alt Disnev Productions. Non-Theatrical 
Film Division. 24(Hi W. Alameda Avenue, Bur- 
bank, California. 

Some Outstanding Nature Study Films 

Beaver Valley, which won the Academy Award 
in 1950. shows the wildlife around a beaver 
pond going through the everyday business of 
courtship, housemaking and staying alive. .\s 
in Seal Island candid scenes are combined into 
a stor\-line that builds to a climax almost like 
a well-acted play. 

Stop motion and time lapse photography were 
applied to a small plot of ground in A'a^ure's Half 
Acre to bring to the screen a fascinating drama 
of the struggle for existence among tiny beings. 
Nature's balance and the survival of the fittest 
are followed from the re-birth of spring to the 
conning of winter. 

RKO Radio Pictures. Inc.. 1270 Avenue of the 
Americas. New York 20. is distributing both 
of these films. 

Examples of other Disney films available for 
company and group showings are these recently 
released subjects: 

The History of Aviation is an 18-minute lar- 
toon story of the development of the air plane 
from the Wright Brothers' first fateful attempt 
to the modern racing plane. Disney Cartoon 
Parade \umber One is a 26-minute series of the 
antics of some of his most famous characters — 
Mickey Mouse. Donald Duck and the rest, .^mong 
the 9-minule cartoons available are Clock Clean- 
ers. Bone Trouble and. Donald and Pluto. Sp 




STANDARD OIL (INDIANA i HOLDS PRESS PREMIERE FOR "MIDWEST HOLIDAY" 



THE RIGHT COMBIN.^TIO.N of an entertaining 
color film, an ideal preview setting and good 
hospitality came together recently when the 
Standard Oil Company (Indiana! held a press 
showing of their first travel film Midwest Holi- 
day at Chicago's Kungsholm Restaurant. Screen- 
ing of the film took place in the acoustical per- 
fection of the Kungsholm's Opera Theatre and 



was highlighted by short talks given by Conger 
Reynolds, director of the compan\"s Public Rela- 
tions Department and by Don Campbell, assistant 
director, who supervised the film project. 

This kind of event can pay real dividends in 
launching a worthwhile public relations picture. 
Standard's press showing was an effective dem- 
onstration of public relations at its best. ^ 




l|.i-iM( vci c I'RKMKW nnsT- iit're ( ivii^er Reyn- 
olds, public relations director I left) and Wesley 
I. .\unn, advertising manager. Standard Oil. 



Producer-client greetings were exchanged by 
Jim Constable and Jim Kellock oj Wilding Pic- 
tures (I to r) shotvn above with Mr. Reynolds. 




Screen writer John Davenport I left) is pic- Wgn-tv staffers £/i;a6e//i B«m, Cene /"i7j|i aH</ 
tured above icith E. L. Gordy of Standard Oil Myrtle Stahl discuss the new picture tcith Don 
and Robert J. Regan of the Chicago American. Campbell and B. L. Pntton oj Standard Oil. 




Distribution expert Dirk Hough oj Modern 
Talking Picture Service llejil shoun with Stand- 
ards Don Campbell. 



Tribune columnist Anion Remenih llejt) is 
shown above with Ed Wilson oj the Trailer 
Conch Manufacturers' Assn. I Also see p. 50) 



NUMBER 3 • \ O 1. 1 M E 14 




When Experience Counts, Atlas Has It 

K»IM)K1) 1\ 1913. MinWKST FILM COMPANY REACHES ITS FORTIETH YEAR 

Lejt: scene Irani an riirh jiinn httrean pirliiie nim/e in l/ir 2(l's. 



IN A BUSINESS where experience counts, the 
■to years of sustained, creative production 
which have just been attained by the Atlas 
Kihn Corporation, midwest producer, is a pretty 
formidable total. For Atlas" history dates back 
to 1913 when an enterprising young business- 
man turned a school supply concern into the 
sale of educational films and soon thereafter 
began the production of sponsored films. 

You can get quite a few reels of historical 
footage out of those early Atlas files. Sponsor 
names like Moline Plow (1916) and the first of 
a still-existent series of films for the U. S. Bureau 
of Mines flicker by at the old "silent speed."" 
That first USBM film, incidentally, was made 
for the Willard Storage Battery people in 1919. 
Some 34 vears later. Atlas led the list of Bureau 
of Mines films in audience popularity with seven 
of the first 10 films — totaling millions in circu- 
lation last year. 

In these years of activity, a film maker uses 
a lot of people and names like Tyrone Power 
( an Atlas bit player some years ago) are on 
the record. But it is the technical achievements 
which lend most to the field and to its clients. 
In 1926. for example. Atlas filmed the first in- 
terior scenes lighted with incandescent lamps, 
especially manufactured at Nela Park by Gen- 
eral Electric. These early 2500 watt lamps were 
made with hand-turned filaments. 

But it is the people who make studio historv 
and through 33 of these 40 years of what Atlas 
rightly calls "■filmaturity", cameraman Harrv Pe- 
terson has continually served to earn a rightfullv 
deserved title of industry pioneer, shared at Atlas 



\>\ vice-president Al Bradish, in charge of pro- 
iluction now, but an Atlas veteran of 25 years. 

Yesterday's production records showed such 
names as the Kansas Gulf Company for whom 
Atlas made what is probably the country's first 
shareholder's report picture, an eight-reeler 
turned out in 1920. Atlas was serving such pres- 
cnt-da\ film users as Swift & Company I 1925l : 
Studebaker (19271 and its relationship with 
Phelps-Dodge Corporation dates back to 193!!. 

Today, there is a little of the mustiness of 
history about the bustling, modern sound stages 
and laboratories at 1111 South Boulevard in Oak 
Park. Through the past five years, a continu- 
ous program of modernization and development 
work under the direction of Larry Mominee, At- 
las' general manager, and his executive staff, has 
made possible high quality standards in both 
sound and picture reproduction. Sales contact 
responsibilities, including creative development 
are handled by vice-presidents Fred Barber and 
Edward Schager (15 year men), in charge of 
sales. The company's swiftly-expanding activi- 
ties in television are under the supervision of 
v.p. Norman Lindquist. James A. Cuca is in 
charge of Atlas" active slidefilm department. 

Sharing the awards received by such well- 
known Atlas' films as Arizona ( Phelps-Dodge I 
is the National Commmittee on Safety honor 
recently given the Clark Equi])ment Company's 
film Safety Saves! This year's Nash Motors' 
sales meeting presentations are Atlas film pro- 
ductions. Other well-known clients include 
Allis-Chalniers Manufacturing Company: Amana 
Refrigeration. Inc.: Austin-Western Companv 



(three color motion pictures! : J. 1. Case Com- 
pany; Hotpoint, Inc.: Inland Steel Company and 
Zenith Kadio Corporation. 

Balance is a keynote of the 1953 Atlas organi- 
zation. Production activities are well diversi- 
fied among motion pictures, theatrical short sub- 
jects, television commercials and slidefilms. Not 
only these but also complete and integrated 
"package"" programs including printed instruc- 
tional materials have been done for such clients 
as the U. S. Air Force and Marathon. Where 
speed is essential. Atlas' control of its facilities 
"from script to screen"" is a real asset to its 
clients. An example of the timeliness possible 
was dramatically illustrated during the weekly 
production of the All American Game of the 
Week football television packages wherein Atlas 
crews filmed a leading football game each week 
and delivered to television stations by the Mon- 
day following each Saturdays big game. Spon- 
sors of this series included Ford and Pontiac. 

There are some important footnotes to this 
brief report on a veteran filmaker. Technical 
items would certainly iTiclude mention of the 
most modern camera equipment: of complete 
16mm and 35mm RCA sound recording: of an 
up-to-the-minute film laboratory, expert in color 
processing and printing. 

But the closing words should also mention co- 
operation and integrity. For Atlas has achieved 
"filmaturity"' through hard-won years of experi- 
ence and in these later years of repeated service 
to many of the same clients, this midwestern 
film studio has demonstrated its readiness to 
do an even better job in the next four decades. S 



Today, it's film F(ir television at Atlas, too. A scene diinnii production 
«l Pure Oil t.v. films featnrins "Mr. Wizard" /Don Herbert). 



Complete studio facilities, including 
meet the many varyins: needs oj business 



sound, have he< 

and I.e. film sp, 



•lodernized to 




BUSINESS St: KEEN MAGAZINE 



3-D Dividends 

STEREO AND ^IDE-SCREEN RESEARCH 
MAY PROFIT BUSINESS FILM USERS 

BUSINESS STANDS to earn some nice divi- 
dends from the present era of active ex- 
perimentation in both sight and somid 
means of conununication. The harvest of 3-D, 
wide-screen, magnetic reproduction of sound, 
negative-positive and color process development 
may yet be fruitful. 

3-D is doing fine via stiJI picture reproduction 
and the advent of the new Triad projector last 
month bears ample witness to its excellence and 
to the important quality of safe travel for the 
business user. The onl)' hitch is in getting good 
stereo slides on a commercial basis. But 3-D 
motion pictures are still a 35mni theatrical babv 
with certain exceptions. Let's tallv up the "ifs" 
on this topic: 

Three-dimensional motion pictures based on 
the use of Polaroid viewing glasses require syn- 
chronized, inter-locked projection equipment. 
Two projectors plus interlock apparatus, etc. 
limit possibilities to permanent or semi-perma- 
nent installations such as fairs, convention ex- 
hibits, company sho«Tooms. 

Wide-screen "dimensional" pictures, such as 
Cinerama, have depended on multiple projector 
installations reaching the large cuned screen 
area and multiple speakers scattered around the 
audience for the stereophonic sound effect. The 
20th-century Fox' wide-screen method (Cinema- 
scope) simplifies the technical apparatus required 
to a single wide-angle projection lens matching 
a similar camera adaptation. 

16mm possibilities of wide-screen, with its 
panoramic effect, are nearing reality. At least one 
lens manufacturer is coming along on the prob- 
lem of a matching pair of 16mni wide-angle 
lenses for both camera and projection. Here 
again, all prospective audiences will need to have 
new wider screens plus the wide-angle projector 
lens attachment. 

Confusion is meanwhile still rampant in the 
theatrical industry. Pity the poor entertainment 
theatre owner who is being told to line up at the 
right for his polarized 3-D installation, plus 
X-thousands of viewers, for X-thousands of dol- 
lars and to also line up to the left for his wide- 
screen apparatus, requiring redesign of the entire 
front section of his theatre. And in the same ear 
he is hearing that his studio sources are about to 
dump their 2-D pictures for immediate millions 
from the television field, which will then be in a 
still better position to knock him for an economic 
loop! As if he wasn't already groggv ! 

If you want to have fun. make some dandy 
stereo slides. Flick them into a handy viewer or 
project "em big as life. .Add some good sound 
via a playback unit or tape reproducer and 
scatter a few speakers around the room. ^ ou'll 
be the life of the sales meeting or the department 
store demonstration!! 

But until 3-D movies and or ""wide-screen"" 
emerges from the laboratory phase, are practical 
and available for 16mm audience use. don'l 
overlook today's big audience. W" 



NUMBER 3 • \OLU.ME 14 • 1953 




Tragic results in "Safety Saves" 

Safer Material Handling 

CLARK SHOWS "SAFETY SAVES"' 

■¥ A new training and safety film for indus- 
trial truck operators has been produced by the 
Clark Equipment Company. The new 30-minute 
16mm sound motion picture, titled Safety Saves. 
was filmed at on-the-job factory and \varehouse 
locations. It dramatically illustrates the "do's 
and don'ts" of safe driving, and shoivs the cause 
of most truck accidents and how to avoid them. 
For truck owners who want to reduce accidents 
and cut damage-to-goods, the new film will be 
a valuable training tool. 

The "villain" of Safety Saves is Willie the 
Cowbo)', a lad who drives his fork truck like 
a hot-rod. Willie is the kind of driver who 
doesn't look where he's going, ignores over- 
head clearance, and parks his truck in the mid- 
dle of busy aisles. In other words. Willie is a 
menace — to fellow employees, to the goods lie"s 
handling, and to himself. The narrator of the 
fihn patiently tries to teach Willie the error of 
his ways, and he nearly succeeds. But unfortu- 
nately, before Willie finally learns his lesson, 
he makes one mistake too many. Poor Willie is 
carried away from the last scene on a stretcher. 
The wonder of it is how he lasted as long as 
he did. 

Along with these horrible examples of how 
not to handle a fork truck, the fihn shows the 
safe, correct method. Besides fork truck opera- 
tion. Safety Saves contains instructions for op- 
erators of towing tractors and hand trucks. 

Industrial truck users were enthusiastic in 
their acceptance of Clark's "Safety Saves" book- 
let, published in 1951. The Safety Saves film 
was produced in response to hundreds of re- 
quests from truck users who expressed the need 
for a dri\er training film. Safety Saves has been 
available on a free loan basis since March 1st. 
For a booking order form, write the Clark 
Equipment Company. Industrial Truck Division. 
Battle Creek, Michigan. 1" 



Eyes front, Willy! This lad 
for trouble in "Safety Saves. ' 



headed 




Color Revolution 

NEGATIVE-POSITIVE COLOR PROCESS 
PROMISES BETTER DEFINITION 

by Courtney Hafela 

SPONSORED Industrhl FlLMS face a revolu- 
tionary improvement within the coming 
year. The new Neg.-Pos. color processes 
have had this impact on the theatrical film indus- 
try and now, as sponsors see the dramatic results 
of direct reduction 16 mm. release prints and, as 
commercial producers learn to handle their pro- 
duction, they are going to increase the scope and 
value of our industry. 

Quality is the big reason Neg.-Pos. is going to 
change our habits and thinking. Shadows that, 
all too often, have been lost to blackness will now 
be transparent and clear due to the great latitude 
inherent in the new film. Highlights hold a new 
graduation unobtainable with any 16 mm. re- 
versal material. Products can be accurately ren- 
dered and because of this will be featured with 
less fear in sponsored films. The fashion, textile, 
and other industries that rely on style and color 
will be able to get consistently good reproduc- 
tions of their products, and therefore will utilize 
films more and more for direct selling purposes. 

More Sales Power With Good Color 

The increased definition obtained by printing 
down from thirty-five nnn. brings texture and 
detail up to where thev can create emotional 
stimulus in selling with films. 

Negative-Positive printing can be controlled 
more easily and with more accuracy than re- 
\ ersal to reversal, so release prints should have 
all the professional brilliance that pre\-iously has 
been limited generally to the theatrical screen's 
imbibition prints. 

Although the sulphide sound tracks now used 
in Kodachrome printing have been greatly im- 
proved, the silver sound track in Neg.-Pos. re- 
leases should be considerably better, and of more 
ade(|uate density, increasing the overall audience 
illusion. 

Realism and Natural Qualities Aid 

Naturalness and realism can be obtained not 
only from the great latitude and more normal 
color contrast, but from the increased speed of 
the negative. An ASA of 32 has been prophesied 
for the new Eastman Tungsten negative due in 
late Mav. ( Eastman expresses it as 150 ft. candles 
of light needed at F:2. 21 frames of a 180° 
shutter. I The two emulsions available today have 
a rating of ASA 16. and both Eastman Kodak 
and Ansco feel that speed increases are in the 
offing. Of course this can mean a more candid 
approach to picture making, those borderline 
scenes alwavs just out of reach before can be 
successfully tackled, plant interiors with existing 
light. ( — I have recently seen a 16 mm. print of 
a scene made with existing light of a large rail- 
road terminal interior . . . the ramifications are 
endless. I Industrial personnel are handled easier 
under the lower light levels: processes and large 

r CONTINUED ON THE FOLLOWING PACE) 



4a 



REVOLUTION IN COLOR: 

(continued from the I'RECKDING PAGE) 

expanses of machinery photograi)lied iiune eco- 
nomically. 

This is the answer to dual release problems. 
Short subjects for theatrical release can be edited 
from normal sponsored films, greatly increasing 
the public relaticms value of what our industr\ 
can offer the film sponsor. 35 mm. prints can 
be made for showing in local theatres where the 
industrial sponsor has plants and personnel, thus 
reaching the employees' whole family and com- 
munity. And the quality of the color will be of 
a calibre comparable w ith the rest of the theatrical 
offerings — theatre owners will be glad to have 
and show such releases. 

Real Asset for Color TV Programs 

Color television, they say. is just around the 
corner. The value of Neg.-Pos. sponsored films 
is easy to see. The definition and good color con- 
trast is going to make them in great demand im- 
mediately and far sighted sponsors will reap a 
hanest of tremendous audiences "for free." The 
difference between this material and the 16 mm. 
reversal of the past will be greatly emphasized 
on the color TV screen. 

The residual value of the color negative mate- 
rial for stock and resale use will remain high for 
several years until a large backlog develops. 
Since the theatrical industry seems headed tow ard 
3-D or wide screen standardization, the market 
will be somewhat limited, but again color TV 
will be a tremendous user of any and all color 
material. In storing color material, liowever. one 
will have to allow for the instability of the dyes. 
Of course this will be improved as time goes on. 
but. as of the moment, the storing qualities of 
developed color negative stock are slighth poorer 
than Kodachrome. This means an estimated life 
of two years, with good storage conditions, be- 
fore noticeable degradation sets in. Valuable 
material should be protected by making B & W 
positive separations, which of course can be 
stored indefinitelv. 

Perfect Definition for "Wide Screen'' 
There are rumblings of "wide screen" interest 
already in the sponsored film field. At least one 
firm has announced development work on ana- 
morphic lenses for the industrial field and cer- 
tainly this will make a dramatic display for ex- 
positions, conventions, etc. Here again the 
increased definition of the 35 mm. color nega- 
tive will show to good advantage. Any "wide 
screen" process that uses a single strip of film. 
such as Cinemascope. Vistarama. etc.. compresses 
a wide area horizontally on this single width. 
Wlien projected, this normal film width suffers 
tremendous horizontal enlargement, far more 
than with conventional projection. Thus defini- 
tion and grain assume proportionate importance. 
As wide screen by nature and cost will be for 
larger audiences, hence larger screens, 35 mm. 
color negative will be essential. 

What are the drawbacks? Cost is the first 
thing always mentioned, but I feel there is a 
great deal of misunderstanding in this depart- 
ment due to a too traditional approach. There 
are ways the smaller producer and sponsor can 

(CONCLUDED ON PACE SE V ENT V-FI VE ) 



Producers Form National Association 

AMEIUCAN ASSUt;lAlTO> OF ITLM PKODLCEKS KLKCTS ITKST OFFICERS 



MAKING Steady Progress toward national 
affiliation of business film companies, 
the newly-formed American Association 
of Film Producers. Inc. has elected George 
Becker, vice-president of Vogue-Wright Stu- 
dios, as its first president. James Kellock, 
Wilding Picture Productions" v. p. will serve as 
vice-president of the new producers association: 
Joseph Betzer. Sarra. Inc., is secretary: and 
Lawrence Mominee. general manager of Atlas 
Film Corporation, is treasurer. 

Directors-at-large are George Finch, vice-presi- 
dent of The Jam Handy Organization (Detroit) : 
Fred Niles. vice-president of Kling Studios ( Chi- 
cago) : and Reid H. Ray, president of Reid H. 
Ray Film Industries (St. Paul). 14 companies 
were included in the original charter member- 
ship represented at the organization's first an- 
nual meeting in Chicago on February 24. 

Atlanta. Philadelphia and St. Louis 

In addition to the above-named. Beeland-King 
Film Productions I Atlanta ) : Berlet. Anderson 
& Marlin. Inc. (Chicago ) : Cinecraft Productions 
(Cleveland): Condor Films. Inc. I St. Louis): 
The DeFrenes Company I Philadelphia I : Mervin 
W. LaRue. Inc. (Chicago) : and Producers Film 
Studio (Chicago) are representative charter 
members. Size of companies represented includ- 
ed some of the nation's smallest and highly- 
specialized studios as well as several of the na- 
tion s largest companies specializing in all phases 
of audio and visual communication. 

For his contributions as consultant during the 
formative stages of the association. O. H. Coelln. 
publisher of Business Screen, was made an 
Honorarv Life Member. 

In a statement outlining the broad goals of 
the AAFP. the following purposes were adopted 
as a preamble to its constitution and by-laws: 

(1) to inform business, government and edu- 
cators of the advantages and values of industrial, 
business, and educational films and other audio- 
visual aids. 



(2) to foster and promote continued ethical 
relationships in all matters between producers 
and their clients. 

(3) to advance llic (luality standards of mo- 
tion pictures, slide-motion pictures, sound slide- 
films and other visual aids for industry, business 
and education. 

(4) 1(1 foster and maintain a good standard of 




AAFP Directors ilejt lo riiihl) are Reid H. 
Ray, secretary Joe Betzer and treasurer Larry 
Mominee. shoun at Hoant meeting. 

labor practices and good relations with various 
recognized crafts engaged in the film industry. 

( 5 ) to form a truly representative industry 
group to place at the disposal of government. 
as required, the qualified facilities and special 
skills of our experienced industrv to further the 
National Defense and National Security. 

Producers Invited to Contact Secretary 

Other producer organizations with similarity 
of interest in national relations are being invited 
to contact the AAFP secretary. Joseph Betzer at 
the organization's designated first headquarters' 



American Film Producers" Board (lejt to right) includes Joseph Betzer; Laurence Mominee; Fred 
Mies. James Kellock. Reid H. Ray, and George Becker. Director-at-large George Finch ivas absent. 





Proiiickrs (I lo t) above are Jim Kellock. Frank 
Balkin. Fred .\iles ami prexy Geor'jie Becker. 

address. 16 East Ontario Street. Chicago 11. III. 
A general meeting of the membership is sched- 
uled for mid- June. ^ 

A Film Report on Smog Research 
Sponsor: Stanford Research Institute 
Title: The City thai Disappears, 30 min.. color. 

produced hy Graphic Films Corporation, 
■♦f In years past the Air Pollution Research Di- 
vision of the Stanford Research Institute has 
issued an annual report in book form to be read 
by a few technical men in the field. This vear 
something new was tried, and a wide audience 
« ill see a sparkling film version of the Division s 
usually dry report on research. 

The report, called The City that Disappears. 




is on a study of the Los .Angeles smog problem. 
.•\n opening cartoon sequence manages to explain 
what smog is and the conditions that cause it 
in an understandable and interesting way. Then 
the film goes into a live action demonstration 
of the cause of smog and the research that is 
taking place. 

The film, as a research report, offers no easy 
solution to the smog problem, but limits itself 
to explanations of the difficulties inherent in 
smog control due to the unusual atmospheric 
inversion of the Los .'\ngeles area, and other 
causes. 

Wide distribution of the film in the Los .An- 
geles area is a certainty. It has already been 
shown in a few theatres and is expected to reach 
more, and eventually television. It is also being 
used by industrial organizations and scientific 
groups. 

The City that Disappears is available from 
the Stanford Research Institute, Palo Alto. Cali- 
foniia. ^ 



N L -M B E R 3 • \ O I. L .ME It 



A Second B & O Picture 
Promotes Juvenile Safety (Campaign 

Sponsor: Baltimore & Ohio Railroad. 
Title: Close Call jor Jimmy. 15 min. color, pro- 
duced by Stephen Fitzgerald & Co., and I ni- 
films, inc. 
■¥■ In the luist two \ears. a million and a quarter 
school children in over four thousand schools 
along the Baltimore & Ohio's right of way in 
thirteen states have seen the company"* film. The 
Happy Locnmotive. .Although quite inexpensive 
to make, the slide-motion picture has not onl\ 
won awards from the National Safety Council 
and the Venice Film Festival, but has achieved 
its purpose in reducing juvenile trespassing on 
the BiO by 75' ( in the last two years. 

The Happy Locomotive is being joined this 
\ear by a sequel. Close Call for Jimmy, which is 
similar to the first film but designed for slightly 
older children. It tells about young Jimmy, who 
is fascinated b\ trains and get? into some trouble 




before he learns to stay away from the tracks. 
In the end. he tries to stop some boys who are 
tampering with a switch, and almost loses his 
life, but is saved in the nick of time. 

The film portrays a number of safety tips 
aimed at capturing the attention of school chil- 
dren. It shows the dangers of throwing missies at 
trains, placing obstacles on tracks, shooting at 
signal equipment, playing on the right of way. 
or climbing on freight cars and installations in 
railroad yards. 

The film is shown in schools b\ a uniformed 
B&O patrolman w ho gives a short talk before the 
screening. Then the pupils are given an illus- 
trated booklet which carries the railroad safety 
me.ssage in a style designed for youngsters. Q' 




PROPtl.i.EK (^LlH Award jor film "The Master 
Element" nas presented hy James G. Lyons, Jr.. 
national secretary (rif^hl) to Chester C. Thomp- 
son, president of The American W ateruays 
Operators. Inc. shoivn at left. The award was 
made hy the Club at the I'ort oj St. Louis. 

American Waterways Operators Tell 
Story of Saving ^ ater Resources 

Sponsor: The .American V^aterways Operators. 

Inc. 
Title: The Master Element. .30 min.. color, pro- 
duced by Mode-.Art Pictures. Inc. 
■K The first documentary film produced for the 
American \taterways Operators. Inc.. national 
association of the barge and towing vessel indus- 
try, was largely instrumental in winning for it 
an award from the Propeller Club for "bettering 
the public understanding of the importance of 
the inland waterways and the American Mer- 
chant .Marine to the national ccononn and de- 
fense." 

The .Master Element is an exciting picture 
story of how the American people are conserv- 
ing, controlling and utilizing their water re- 
sources. Captured on film are the romance of 
the rivers, the fearful force of the flood, and the 
spectacle of the great harbor. 

Animated panoramic efTects on a continental 
scale show the glory of man's conquest of this 
force of nature, and the magnitude of modern 
river tran.sportation. 

The Master Element has traveled from coast 
to coast via television, and 20 color prints are 
fully booked for a month in advance. The film 
is available on a free loan basis from the Ameri- 
can V^aterwavs Operators. Inc.. 1319 F. Street 
.\.W .. Washington 4. D.C. ^ 



Typical (>/ set/uences in "The Master Element" is thi.i scene alonti \eu Orleans if ater front. 




GM Visualizes the Woman's Viewpoint 

•HOME AT THE WHEEL" I'KODICKI) BY KOHEIM I) U IS T(» AH) W ( »\1KN 1)|{|\ Kl{^ 



AITOMOBILE MAM KACTUHEKS have 
long reciigriiized tliat womeii are becoming 
an ever more important factor in influ- 
encing or actually making the family decision on 
what kind of car to buy. This is true, sales re- 
seeirchers have found, not only in such pre- 
supposed feminine prerogatives as color, style 
and upholstery, but also in the purely mechanical 
functions of the car. Today, automotive engineers 
have developed dozens of new advances, like 
power brakes, power steering and automatic 
transmissions, and. if pleasing women drivers is 
not entirely at the back of the engineering minds. 
the effect on the woman at the wheel is not incon- 
siderable. 

Too Few Films Aimed at Audieme 

Knowing the ''power of women," automobile 
advertising makes a special appeal to distaff 
readers. Yet, with few exceptions, films made b\ 
car manufacturers ha\e never been designed 
particularly for women, or. even made on sub- 
jects that are normally preferred by women. For 
instance. General Motors has some fifty or more 
films in active distribution on such subjects as 
mass production, popular science, human rela- 
tions, sports, and only two or three Frigidaire- 
sponsored films which might be thought of as 
plarmed particularly with women audiences in 
mind. Ford has 20 or 30 films on the automobile 
industry. Americana, vacation lands, etc.. but 
none particularly for the lady customer, and this 
is equally true of such other film sponsors as 
Nash, Studebaker and Chrysler. 

It is not because there is any dearth of 
women's audiences that the automotive industry 
has seemed to avoid tliem, film-wise. There are 
some 7,500 women's clubs in the U. S., most of 
which are equipped with projectors and manv of 
which use films regularly in their programs. In 
addition, women probably make up a good 50' , 
or more of all other film audiences, including 
Junior Leaguers, PTA's, Eastern Star, and the 
many women's auxiliaries. 

There are indications, however, that this anom- 



alous situation is about to change. One important 
step was General Motors' decision to make a film 
(which may be the forerunner of a series I 
planned for that much maligned — and touchy — 
section of the automotive public — the Woman 
Driver. 

Good Psychology Plu^ Heal Tc<lini(iur 
The new film, produced by Robert Davis Asso- 
ciates, is Home at the Wheel, 14 min, b/w. a 
driver-education training subject that combines 
a psychological approach with an authentic tech- 
nique. GM recognized that the film required more 
than average preparation in dealing with such a 
delicate subject. In spite of all the nice things 
that insurance statistics prove about the safetv 
record of women at the wheel, there are some 
weaknesses in driving techniques that seem to be 
predominantly feminine. And women have them- 
selves recognized this — enough so that GM has 
had numerous requests from women's groups 
asking for material that would help them master 
driving problems as easily as they ma.ster the 
mechanics of the kitchen or the office typewriter. 

Two Specific Problems Are Met 

Among the troubles encountered by women 
drivers, according to their own responses to GM's 
field research, are parallel parking and inade- 
quate planning ahead in traffic. The story of 
Home at the W heel is aimed at showing women 
how to strengthen their driving techniques in 
these two spots where they often err; and to 
dramatize the lesson so that the film would make 
stimulating entertainment for women's clubs, 
PTA's and television. 

The psychological theme that faulty attitudes, 
cause many accidents is introduced through ac- 
tion and dialogue. But the positive aspect is 
stressed not the negative. Good driving is due to 
a self-confident, well-adjusted attitude about 
driving as well as definite skills that can be 
learned is a better way of stating the purpose of 
the film. While the action intimates that the 
psychological aspects of good driving are as im- 



Here's the special camera mount used in filming ''Home at the If heel." netv General Motors' filn 




pcprlaiit a> llii- tcihni(|ucs. it makes its point 
lliniugh audience participation in a realistic situ- 
ation. The word "psychology" is never mentioned. 

The (locumenlary technique makes each situa- 
tion real. It permits the feminine audience at 
which it is aimed to identify itself with the 
"heroine" and her problems. Roberta Zechicl, 
well-known woman script writer, was engaged 
for the film, and several women editors were 
consulted to insure that the feminine viewpoint 
would be observed and maintained throughout. 

.Specific instruction in parking and planning 
ahead are included in the film. And the word "in- 
cluded"' is an accurate description. The lessons 
were neither dragged in nor featured. The title. 
Home at the Wheel was chosen because women 
naturally would like the comfortable feeling 
they enjoy at home to carry o\er when they're 
driving the family car. 

Filmed Entirely Along the Highways 
Home at the Wheel w as made entirely on loca- 
tion. GM and the producer decided that while 
this might nmltiply the production difficulties ( it 
was photographed mostly outdoors in Westches- 
ter County. New York, during the short days of 
last December), it would also fortify the impact. 
The GM plant in North Tarrytown handled all 
the automotive problems while the town officials 
of the Tarrytowns and White Plains cooperated 
in attending to traffic and policing. 

The story follows the driving problems of a 
young housewife. She uses the car constantly, 
acting as chauffeur for her husband and children, 
marketing, going to school, meeting trains. Y et 
she hasn't achieved the same mastery of her car 
that she exercises over her household. One dav 
after she has taken her husband to the railroad 
station and dropped her children at school, she 
picks up a friend for a shopping tour and makes 
two serious errors. She makes a left turn from 
the right hand lane and delays traffic while try- 
ing to park parallel. The unpleasant encounters 
with other drivers and her doubts of her own 
driving ability make her irritable until her hus- 
band points out how ably she handles compli- 
cated household appliances. 

She Masters Her Driving Faults 
Next day while going about her daily chores 
she idlv picks up a toy car belonging to her son. 
She uses that car to teach herself how to over- 
come her driving faults with her husband's voice 
acting as a friendly prompter. With renewed 
confidence, she meets her husband and friends 
at the station. As she makes the necessary sharp 
turn, her husband compliments her on her driv- 
ing. 

The picture observes a couple of driving faults 
in other cars seen in the film — speeding and 
jumping the red light. Without emphasis, but 
unmistakably, these are are driven by those old 
practitioners of the rapidly pa.ssed stop light — 
men. This should warm the ladies' hearts. 

Some of the driving scenes were shot through 
the rear w indow of a new Pontiac Catalina. used 
in the film, with the camera on a mount in the 
car trunk from which the deck had been re- 
moved. Attached to the rear bumper was a little 
trailer that held a generator to power lights in- 
side the car. This combination of natural and 
artificial light was used in all of the sequences 
iroNTIMED 0.\ PACE SEVENTY-TWO) 



BLslNEsS SCREE.N M .^ < . A Z I N E 




"Dark Interlude" Story of Blind 
Viiii!- a T<)|j Award at Bc».>t<>ii 

Sponsor: Ovcrbrook School for tlir Blind. 
Title: Dark Interlude. SO min. color, pro- 
duced by News Keel Lahorator). 
* One day, a few years ago, a teen-at:e l)o\ 
was injured in a sKooting arcidtnl while 
nut hunting wild turkev. After several 
agonizing weeks of waiting in the hospital, 
he was told he would never see again. 
Blindness could ha\e completely ruined the 
l)o\"s life, and it almost ilid. 

Mow the l)o\ founil a useful and produc- 
tive place for himself in the world is the 
true storv of the Overhrook SchooPs hne 
new filin. Dark Inlerlmle. which will soon 
lie released for first showings in the I'hila- 
(lelphia area. 

Jor Tallxil. in the film, was almost re- 
vi^'ned to a life of doing nothing, being 
[><r|»-tualK under someone's care and 
forced to live on charity. In his deep de- 
pression, he was brought to Overhrook. one 
iif the oldest and most famous schools for 
the blind in the country. Through his ex- 
IM-riences. the picture shows a good deal of 
what blindness means and how many peo- 
ple overcome part of its handicap. 

Dark Inlerlmle is not intended to raise 
monev for the school, nor is it meant to pat 
the s<hool on the back for its methods a- 
much as to try to form a little different 
altitude about bliiiil |)eople among the gen- 
eral public, with some emphasis on pros- 
jiMlive emplovers of blinded people. The 
film explains that the only thing blind 
pi-ople have in common is their blindnes-^. 
but othtrwise are as individual as i ai li one 
can possibly be. 

At Overhrook. bovs walk about the 
grounds easily, using memory and the real 
"sixth sense" that warns them of objects in 
their path. Thcv play a variation of bas<-- 
ball. rolling the ball from pitcher to catcher, 
baiting and fielding, almost unlx'lievably to 
us, bv sense of sound. W ith a keen seiis^' of 
touch, they learn mathematics, gcometrv, 
biology, geography, etc, using models for 
understanding the inter-relationship of ob- 
jicts. shapes, land masses atid nundiers. 

(Hi-rbrook people have found gooil jidi- 
in almost everv fiehl of in<lustrv and the 
arts, Joe Talhol, in the film, for instance, is 
now a skilled machine shop mechanic. 

The aitors in Dork Inlerhule are all stu- 
dents and teachers at Overhrook. Joe Talhol 
is actually Robert L. Showmaker. His story 
is a true one and he plays his part with skill 
and sensitivity — under the direction of 
I'aul Wendkos of News K.-el Laboratory. ^ 

Announced as a Festival dinner 
■¥ \X presstinie. Dark Inlerluite was an- 
nounced as winner of first award among 
adult education films at the l').V< Boston 
film Festival held Mav 2. 



Studebaker Birthday 

TIIREK NKW IMCIl KKS Id OBSKKN K 
CORI'OK VTIONS CKNTKNNIAL YKAK 

•K On its 101st vcar. the Slmlebaker Corporation 
is about to embark on a conientrated film pro- 
gram belatedly celebrating its centennial and 
encompassing three motion pictures. 15(M) prints 
ordered to date, and a strong, well-organized dis. 
tribution program. The company has spent an 
estimated half million dollars for production and 
prints and expects to sign contracts with a large 
film distributor shortly that will literally saturate 
the countrv with Studebaker films. In fact, the 
company estimates that it will reach 25,000.000 
people during the next twelve months. 

For this investment, Studebaker has received 
three movies, all varying in technique, which, if 
a little lacking in the deftness of the company's 
new Kavmond Loewy-designed 105.3 model.s, are 
exccllentiv produced and certainly reflect the siz- 
able bu<lget that was put into them. 

30-Minte Teelinicolor Film a Feature 
The "big" picture of the group is a 30-niinute 
Technicolor film. The Sludebaker Story, pro- 
duced by Screen (lems. Inc., and not a little 
reminiscent of the recent Dul'onI Slory epic of 
the chemical family. It starts in the Studebaker 
brothers' blacksmith shop in South Bend 101 
vears ago and follows the company's fortunes 
to the present. It's lush, and it's real Hollywood. 
\nother film in the sinmltaneously released 
group is Louis de Rochemonts Family of Cra/ls- 
men. M) min. b w. which shows the private and 
working livcN of the Bokon familv who are typi- 
cal of the thousands of family teams that have 
alwavs been a Studebaker tradition. It's a cork- 
ing show as long as the dozens of Bokons hold 
swav but chills as it winds up with a scene of 
a thousand employees grimlv singing the "Stude- 
baker Song" from tightly clutched song sheets. 

Tells Story of Dealer Relations 
Beyond a Promise. 'M) min, b w, another 
.Studebaker film, shows how the family relation- 
ship carries over among the companv s dealers. 
The film, produced by .Vix-x Film Corporation, 
ciimbincs a dramatic plot with what the produc- 
ers modestly believe to be "the finest photo- 
graphic sequences ever made of manufacturing 
processes," 

Hero of the picture is a young veteran who is 
reluctant to enter his father's automobile sales 
business in a typical American town. As the 
Studebaker storv unfcdds. he licvomcs intrigued 
bv the realization that the auto dealer is the es- 
sential link between the public and the thousands 
who work together to supply the nation's high- 
way transportation, 

,Studebaker's three films were a project of the 
company's public relations finn. Hill & Knowl- 
lon. Inc. and were su|H'rvised bv Film Coun- 
selors. Inc. 5^ 




The Stidkiiaker Story features this scene of 
J. .\f. Sludebaker ridinf: with Rol>ert Cornthwaite, 
his molor-minileil son-in-lau . 




Brother-Ovvxkks oI H A: (. Studebaker blatk- 
smith shop receive 23 cents from their first cus- 
tomer for shoeing a horse. l"Studeltaker Story" f 




A ^ (ilNC Veteran discloses to his father his in- 
derision about rontinuint: in dealer field in 
"Beyond a I'romise." 




Di-tribiitioii: national distribution of the Stude- 
baker ('enlennial films is to Iw handled by Mod- 
c-rn Talking Picture Service via its nationwide 
nctwork of film exchanges. 



-i^**, 



Dot I ME^T^H^ Film "family of ('raftsmen" 
fhous "Pop" llokon m/io jierpetuates a comfiany 
Iraitition of craftsmanship and pride in product. 

Itos^eil a/nnc from father to son. 



^ I M It K K 3 




Camera closeiip on the hilcrtype film 

Revolutionary New Fotosetter 
Demonstrated in Intertype Picture 

Sponsor: Interlvpe Corporation. 

Title: A \eu Era in Priming. 35 min. color, 
produced by Louck-^ & Norling Studios in col- 
lalioration with .Micliel-Cather. Inc. 

■¥■ Intert\pe"s new motion picture. A ,\'ew Era in 
Priming, which was shown for the first time last 
month at the American Newspaper Publishers 
Association Conference at the Waldorf-Astoria 
Hotel in New York, present-- the revolutionary 
Fotosetter photographic line composing machine. 

The picture begins with an explanation of the 
growth of the various branches of the graphic 
arts. It shows that offset printing in the last 
quarter century has increased ten times in size, 
compared to a 10' < growth for other methods 
of printing in the same period. 

This phenomenal growth of offset also created 
an urgent need for a better means of producing 
type for offset, and for other plate-making means. 
WTiile photographic typesetting is not a new 
principle, having been developed as long ago as 
1894. available machines have not previously 
been considered commercially practical. But 
recognizing the need for w ide scale photographic 
tvpesetting, Intertype developed the Fotosetter 
which seems to overcome old problems with the 
system completely. 

The picture shows just how the Fotosetter 
machine works and how it handles various sizes 
of type, insertion of pi characters, and how it is 
readily adaptable to existing composing room 
operating and servicing personnel. 

A I\eiv Era in Priming also shows how the 
product of the machine is used in various sections 
of the graphic arts, which include not only 
lithography, but gravure and letterpress as well. 
It demonstrates the steps that are saved by this 
new method, such as reproduction proving, stor- 
age of heavy metal, breaking up of fonns. re- 
touching of enlargements and many other opera- 
tions which, up to this point have been necessary 
in the production of printing from overall plates. 

The film shows clearly the good quality of 
Fotosetter composition through the use of en- 
largements which compare Fotosetter composi- 
tion with that of conventional reproduction 
proofs. Manv e.vamples of printed pieces usin,:: 
type set on the Fotosetter and photographs nl 
Fotosetter installations throughout the U.S. ari 
also shown. 

Technical animation and related straight pho- 
tography explain the complexities of automatic 
justification, one of the principal features of the 
Fotosetter. as the film shows. g' 



\ lll.M SKIilKS TIIVI \\l\^ \\\ \I!I)S \\1) ■~i'i;\K> I.WCI \(;k OF ITS M DIFNCE 

Sat'etj First is Trucking's lioal 

.\SSOCIATION OF MTOMOITVK MITF AL INSLRANCK COMl'WIKS I'KKSFNTS 
TRAINING FILM PR0(;KAM THAT IIKIJ'S INDlSTin \1\IM \l\ S\FK RFCORD 



WHEN THE STAFF of the Accident Pre- 
vention Department of the National As- 
sociation of .Automotive Mutual Insur- 
ance Companies was given the assignment of 
producing a series of training films for commer- 
cial vehicle drivers, a set of specifications was 
laid down, to wit: 

Each film must be complete within itself 
and cover one specific facet of safe truck 
operation. 

Each film must be long enough to cover 
the topic adequately, yet short enough to 
be used at a half-hour meeting, with plenty 
of time left for discussion. 

The films must teach safe truck operation 
without preaching safety. 

The films must speak the language of the 
truck driver without picturing truckers as 
an uninformed and uncultured group of 
slang-speaking ignoramuses. 

The instruction provided by the films 
must come from the mouth of a man who 
looks, talks, and acts like a truck driver, 
and not like a college professor or radio 
commentator. 

The films must be "accepted" by drivers, 
hold their interest, and at times be humor- 
ous without resorting to puns, cliches, low 
humor and bad grammar. 

The films must, besides providing infor- 
mation on how vehicles can be operated 
safely, show management the latest tech- 
niques of instructing drivers. 

Each film topic must be produced in two 
versions — 35mm sound slidefilm and a 
16 mm sound motion picture with some 
slide sequences, with one script with modi- 
fications serving both. 
This was a big order. Were it not for the fact 
that no training films for commercial vehicle 
drivers were then available, and the fact that 
training-aids of this type were sorely needed, it 

A Worried Driver confides in "Andy Meyers" 
about his safety problems. 



i,- doubtful that the ta.sk would ever have been 
unilertaken. But it was undertaken, and today a 
series of ten films covering practically every driv- 
ing situation which confronts a trucker is avail- 
able to anyone who is interested, anvwherc. The 
film topics run the gauntlet from "how to drive 
safely through a busy intersection" to "what to 
eat to avoid fatigue." 

Produced in 16mm and a- Sli(lefilm> 
In order that no one would be unable to show 
one or more of these films because he did not 
have the right projection equipment, each of the 
fihiis was produced in two versions — one a 
standard 35mm sound slidefilm ( approximately 
60 frames « ith a 12-inch one-side plav record I 
and the other a 16mm sound motion picture in 
which a few still scenes were employed to keep 
the production within the relativelv low budge- 
tary limits. 

So skillfully was the slide-motion technique 
used in the motion versions in a majoritv of the 
films the still scenes escape notice entirely. In- 
sofar as film footage is concerned, the films aver- 
age about fiO't motion with most of the voice 
synchronized with the action. 

Encourages Lse of "Driver Trainers' 

In preparing the format for the first film of 
the series. Caution At The Crossroads, it was 
decided to use the films to promote the use bv 
trucking companies, of "driver trainers." This 
technique of pro\iding instruction to connnercia! 
vehicle drivers was developed by Professor .-\mos 
E. Neyhart of The Pennsylvania State College. 
It is a relatively new procedure in truck trans- 
portation circles. This accomplished one of the 
objectives of the films, that of having the instruc- 
tion come from a truck driver and not from a 
cultured off-screen voice. In most companies 
using them, a driver trainer is a seasoned opera- 
tor who has the confidence and respect of other 
drivers, and who can boast of a long accident- 

.A-NDY ViSLALlZES his points in a scene from one 
nj the 10-part film series described above. 




BUSINESS SCREEN .M A G .\ Z I N E 



as; told to Blsiness Screen 
l)v Dick Bennett 



free lecord. He is in lui sense a supervisor. He 
is a teacher of drixers who instructs recruit 
drivers and corrects itie driving faults of old 
hands. 

.■\fter preparing an acceptable script for the 
first film, the staffs of the Vogue-Wright Studios 
and the Mutual Insurance Association set out to 
find a Chicago actor who ""looked, talked and 
acted like a truck driver and who was so deepiv 
rooted in the Windy City that he would not be 
leaving before the Series was completed, a period 
of at least three years. Such a man was found in 
George Cisar. a radio and television performer 
who met all the specifications perfectly. George 
became ""Andy Meyers." and appeared as a 
■"driver trainer" in each of the ten films. So 
thoroughly has the name ""Andx Meyers" been 
established in the trucking industrv that nianv 
people telephoning or writing about the films 
refer to them as ""Andy Meyers films." 

How to Handle Ein|)loyee Meetings 
By using a driver trainer in each of the films, 
it made possible the accomplishment of another 
of the purposes of the films, that of showing 
management new techniques of getting across 
safety messages and instructions to drivers. For 
example, in Caution At The Crossroads. Andy 
Meyers used the lecture method, employing such 
teaching aids as charts, graphs and diagrams. 

In the film on backing. Danger In Reverse. 
Andy directed his instructions to a driver who 
had just backed into a post on the company lot. 
In the film Too Fast For Comlitions. which re- 
lates to speeding. Andy used I in person) a na- 
tionally known traffic authority. Col. Frank M. 
Kreml of Northwestern Uni\ersity Traffic Insti- 
tute, to convince a driver who had had an acci- 
dent at night in a rainstorm, that legal speeds 
can be too fast under certain conditions. 

The Safety Director of the American Trucking 
Associations. Inc.. G. D. Sontheimer. was used 
by Andv as a "guest lecturer"" at a drivers" meet- 
ing in the film about tailgating. entitled Too 
Close jor Comfort. The ATA is putting on a 
continuous campaign against this prevalent prac- 
tice of ""riding bumpers." 

.\ccident Review Board in Action 
In the film about the hazards involved in driv- 
ing on the wrong side of the street. Wrong Side 
Suicide, an accident review board meeting was 
the gimmick used to lay the groundwork for a 
safety lesson. At this meeting, a magnetic board 
with toy automobiles was used to demonstrate 
an accident. After the meeting. Andy took a 
ride with the driver involved and discovered that 
he had unconsciously driven on the wrong side 
of the center line a half-dozen times during a 
short trip. 

In the film which has for its i)urposc the in- 
struction of drivers on what to do at the scene 
of an accident. What Happened? a driver ap- 
pealed to .Andy for help in making out an acci- 
dent report. The instruction is provided through 
the assistance .Vndy gave this driver. 

The opening scene of Looking For Trouble, a 
film relating to a driver's res|x>nsibility for the 




Hki.pim: The Tricking Indi.-trv niainlain good safety records 
hart/diitling series of educational films nou in widespread use. 



Meyer a" job in this 



care and maintenance of his vehicle, shows a 
driver locking horns with the superintendent of 
maintenance because of something which wasn't 
fixed. Andy appears in the nick-of-time. acts as 
a peace-maker, and proceeds to straighten out 
the pugnacious driver regarding preventive main- 
tenance, actually showing how the inspection of 
a vehicle is made. 

In Mind Your .Manners, a film on driver cour- 
tesy. Andy carries out the Big Boss' orders that 
he make gentlemen out of some of the cowboy 
drivers in the outfit. This was brought about 
because the Boss observed one driver driving 
like a maniac. Andy gets the driver's side of the 
story as they lunch together and then took a trip 
with the accused, pointing out how easy it is to 
be courteous. 

Iniproveil Habits Save a Good Driver 
The film Dark Daze relates to night driving 
hazards, and opens with the announcement that 
a driver, who was about to be fired three years 
before because of his accident record, was to 
receive his three-year no-accident award. The film 
shows how Andy helped this driver achieve that 

.\ Driver Tells his story as associates help to 
eliminate needless accidents. 




award by correcting his eating, sleeping and 
driving habits. 

The final film of the series. .Split-Second Sur- 
vival, show s Andv emplov ing autlio-visual pro- 
jection equipment to get over to drivers, at a 
drivers" meeting, the fact that those who know 
what to do in an emergency situation (like hav- 
ing a front lire blow at high speed i come through 
unscathed. 

Award Record Shows Value of Films 

That these films accomplish their objectives 
is evidenced bv the fact that four of the 10 films 
were given awards by the National ("ommittee 
on films for Safety — two first Places, one Award 
of Merit, and one Honorable Mention. The films 
winning First Place Awards were Caution .4t The 
Crossroads, and Dark Daze. Wrong Side Suicide 
was given an Honorable Mention, and Whal 
Happened? an Award of merit. 

If that isn"t enough, they can pull from the 
files some letters that attest to the fact drivers not 
only liked what they saw in these films, but want 
more of the same. Those who worked on the films 
are particularly proud of a letter received from 
an official of a federal agency which operates 
hundreds of trucks in Chicago. This official stated 
that during the two months following the show- 
ing of the films Danger in Reverse there were 
mV r less backing accidents among the trucks 
operated In this agency. Such testimonials come 
IrcquentIv . 

Another encouraging sign that the films are 
doing the job for which they were intended and 
are valuable instruments for training can be 
found in the fact that the same insurance com- 
pany executives vvho authorized the production 
of the training films for commercial drivers re- 
centlv authorized a new series of films to be used 
to instruct police officers in the lates^ traffic con- 
trol and accident prevention techniques. This 

tCONTINVED ON P.\CE SEVENTY-THREE) 



MM B E R 3 • \ U 1. 1 .M E 11 • 19 5 3 




Reporter Dale Bennett gets an assignment 
from his editor to iirit-e about mid-America . . . 



Young Dancers and musicians at famed Inter- 
loclien lilimpsed in a "Midwest Holiday" scene. 




Three Stars are (left to right) Andy Leigh, 
Kay Marlyn and Charles Fhnn who p!a\ leads. 



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Tom Sawvfr's Home brings back memories of 
Mark Twain in another scene from the picture. 



Standard Oil Presents "Midwest Holiday" 

COLOR TRAVEL FILM OF MIDWEST ATTRACTIONS HAS TOP AUDIENCE APPEAL 



Sponsor: Standard Oil Company (Indiana). 
Title: Midwest Holiday. 27 min.. color and 
sound, produced by Wilding Picture Produc- 
tions. Inc. Distributed by Modern Talking 
Picture .Service. Inc. in 15 iniHwpstern states 
only. 
■K There's a happy famih atmosphere through- 
out the colorful scenes of .Midwest Holiday, first 
travel motion picture to be sponsored by this 
veteran film user, the Standard Oil Company ( In- 
diana). From advance booking reports, this 27- 
minute trip through the tourist attractions of 
fifteen midwestern states will provide a lot 
more family happiness among the thousands in 
Itrmm and television audience? who are destined 
to see it. 

It's Good Entertainment for Family 
'"Good entertainment" is the keynote of Holi- 
day and its primary emphasis is on that theme 
with a minimum of '"commercial" and a lot of 
human interest scenic wonders, historical and 
modfrn events. There's a romantic angle in the 
Ijglil. plot story on whith the travel sequences 
are arrayed but its the scenery that gets top- 
billing and deserves it. 

The film s.tory itself begins in a Chicago news- 
paper office, and moves along the Lake Michigan 
dunes — until boy meets girl. From the cool, re- 
freshing waters of Lake Michigan the grass 



sprinkled sand dunes fade off into forests. The 
groves of trees at Interlochen are filled with mu- 
sic and form a setting for dancers. 

Pioneer Places and Modern Cities 

An old water wheel in Indiana tells of the 
hardships and the enterprise of the early pio- 
neers. Restored log cabins at New Salem in 
Illinois recall the great place in history held by 
Abraham Lincoln. The wide sweep of the Mis- 
sissippi brings back the old river days, and 
Mark Twain's immortal Tom Sawyer and Huck 
Finn. 

The modern buildings of Kansas City and the 
tall white tower of the state capitol at Lincoln. 
Nebr. contrast with Boot Hill and the dangerous 
early days of Dodge City. Kan. White-faced 
Herefords show the progress made in beef cat- 
tle since the longhorns of only a few-score years 
ago and oil wells sprout on the capitol lawn 
in Oklahoma Citv. 

Through the Rockies and Tetons 

Farther west are Pike's Peak, and the Rockies. 
Trail Ridge Road, two miles high, winds among 
snow-streaked peaks, with the dark timberline 
marking the mountainside below it. 

The majestic Tetons tower above the Wyoming 
plains, their steep sides rising from the waters 
of wooded lakes. Pine trees frame a aem-like 



Mi-w i,f Jackson Lake and the mountains be- 
liind it. 

To the north are the sights of the Yellowstone 
in a green setting of virgin stands of lodge-pole 
pines. Ileip are boiling pools of deep sapphire: 
the white falls, plunging into the canyon: and 
Old Faithful itself, sending its plume as high as 
a sixteen-story building. 

There's a Romantic .Angle, Too 

After traveling for thousands of miles through 
llw magnificent American scenes, a young for- 
eign correspondent might well turn from the 
glitter of Paris to the job of interpreting Ameri- 
ca especially if on his trip he finds a girl who 
loves the middle west in which she grew up. 

As a public service entertainment film — con- 
taining no advertising — Midwest Holiday is suit- 
able for showing to a variety of groups — youth, 
church, civic, school, patriotic, fraternal, and 
many others interested in travel. 

Like other company motion pictures. Midwest 
Holiday is available free on request from each 
of Standard's 28 sales field and 5 refinery offices 
serving the 15 midwestern states where the com- 
|ian\ markets. Modern Talking Picture Service is 
handling distribution in these 15 states. 

In line with Standard's policy of informing 
iiriployees first about company news and special 
events, first showings of the film were to com- 
pany groups. The picture was also scheduled as a 
feature of spring dealer conferences in sales 
fields, 

A\ailable for Television Screening 

Midwest Holiday is also available for showing 
on television via Modern. For this purpose 
special black and white prints were prepared. 

Hardly before first color prints were on hand, 
booking requests began to mount and summer 
roadshow requests alone may keep Midwest Holi- 
day among the top favorites this season. 

In the production of Standard's first travel 
film — after all surveys had been completed, the 
script written, edited, and approved — two Wild- 
ing production crews fanned out into the mid- 
west's 15 states to catch the glory of landscape 
and landmark at the top of the 1952 vacation 
season — weather permitting. Accompanying them 
were three Standard Oil representatives who had 
been closely associated for months in developing 
the concept of the film, its story line, and finally 
the script, as written by Wilding staffers. ^ 

V^ILDING Camera Crew on location "somewhere 
in the Middle West'' during the filming of Stand- 
ard's colorful "Midwest Holiday." 




50 



BUSINESS SCREEN .MAGAZINE 



That Night, History Was Made . . . 




ONE SUMMEH NIGHT in D.tn.it. Il.nrv Ford pushed his httli- -Vniadro-ov dt- ' 
out for its first trial niii. 

I'p and down the dark empty streets it cluigged . . . Past the sleeping lionscs. 
phosthke and nnreal, Mitted the shape of things to eome. That night histor\ was 
inaile. The street «as never the same again. 

Tlie faithful re-enactu\ent of that historical e\ent is one of the many tnie-lo-life scciu-s 
which MPO has re-created in the Ford Motor CompaiiN's forthtxiining 50th Anni\ersarv 
motion picture. "The .Xmerican Hoail." 

This feature-length film has In-en hronglit to llii' sin-eii with the faithful adherence to facts 
and the bvUriiihililii which distinguish all \II'C) protluctions. 



J^^J^O 



iPioJucti 



15 EAST 53rd STREET • NEW YORK 22 • MURRAY HILL 8-7830 



MMKKR ,1 • vol. L ME 14 • 19 53 



a 



What's Ne w in Basine ss Pictures 

CASE HISTORIES OF FOUR NEW SPONSORED FILMS 




The effects oj heal 

Air Conditioning for the Busy Executive 



S].onsor: Milchell Mamifacturiiig 
Title: Health and Your Wealth. 
■¥■ "Heat attack equals heart attack" 
if the message of Health and Your 
Wealth, the 1953 addition to the 
film library of the Mitchell Manu- 
facturing Company, producers of 
window-type room air conditioners. 

Based on facts authenticated by 
the company's research foundation 
in special experiments at Michael 
Reese Hospital in Chicago, Health 
and Your Wealth shows what can 
happen to a business executive who 
ignores the thermometer on a swel- 
tering summer day. 

R. J. Pemberton is hot and un- 
comfortable in his skyscraper office 
as the film opens. Shortly he is re- 
])laced on the screen by a hippo- 
potamus lolling in a cool pond, and 
the narrator points out that despite 
his thick skull the hippo is showing 
more sense about combating the 
heat. 

Pemberton, who avoids exercise 
on doctor's orders, proceeds to dic- 
tate a speech in the heat until his 
vision blurs and he blacks out. The 
next time the camera focuses on him 
he is a weak and fe\erish hospital 



p^ilient. On llic rjiart at tlic foot of 
his bed the doctor has written: 
"Heat attack equals heart attack."' 
The speech. "Full Steam Ahead." 
was never delivered, the narrator 
says, because "Pemberton worked 
up too much steam of his own with- 
out providing a safety valve." 

A doctor explains the phenom- 
enon more scientificallv with a series 
of cartoons and charts, with empha- 
sis on the load the heart must bear 
when the temperature reaches the 
SO's and 90"s. Flashbacks and more 
animation show^ the symptoms of 
heat attack, and then the picture 
appropriately closes with an anima- 
tion of a heart functioning normally 
in an air-conditioned room. 

Health and Your Wealth, used 
with other film material, should 
provide a hard-hitting sales pitch at 
dealer and distributor meetings. 
Shown alone it should be an effec- 
tive institutional film. Mention of 
the companv is restricted to a photo 
of the Mitchell unit and a Mitchell 
Foundation credit line, but there is 
never any doubt in the viewer's 
mind as to what the ])roducer is 
selling. ^ 



Antibiotics Improve the Nation's Meat Crop 



Sponsor: Lederle Laboratories Di- 
vision, American Cyanamid Co. 
Title: formula jor Profit. 21 niin. 
color, produced by Willard Pic- 
tues, Inc. 
M Important as the antibiotic drugs 
have been in the control of disease 
in man, there is much evidence that 
they may become even more import- 
ant as an ingredient of animal feed. 
To show what these drugs are 
accomplishing today. Lederle, pro- 
ducer of Aureomycin. the principal 
antibiotic food supplement used in 
modern farm animal feeding, is dis- 
tributing a new film that demon- 
strates how pigs, chickens, turkeys 
and calves grow bigger and quicker 
when fed an antibiotic supplemented 
diet. 



Aimed at farmers through the co- 
operation of local feed manufac- 
turers and dealers, the film is bas- 
ically the story of grain plus water 
equalling meat: and grain, vitamin 
supplements and antibiotics in the 
fonn of manufactured feeds plus 
water equalling much more meat, 
thus, more profit for the farmer. 

What causes this, the film says, is 
complex and scientific and it does 
not attempt to explore the back- 
ground of antibiotic feed experi- 
mentation. It gets down to actual 
proven cases. When well balanced 
manufactured feeds including Aure- 
omycin are used, hogs are ready for 
market four to five months earlier. 
Many more chickens in every thou- 
sand go to market instead of suc- 



I umliitii: In disease of coccidinsi- 
«lu-ii ihi- feed contains the drug. 
Megasul. 

Against a backgrourul of hand- 
some anirTial photi)graj>h\ I incluil- 
ing beautiful scenes of grazing buf- 
falo I. llii- fihn elates thai aiitibiolic 



Mipi 
bala 



icMl> do not ri'place a good 
■il diet hut improve them 
further. In jjreseiiting the case for 
antibiotics in feeding as a tremen- 
dous economic boon for the farmer, 
the film is impressivelv convinc- 
ing. ■ ^ 




II, ■■Ra<uiii Char 



;/j« 



Champion Presents Highlights of Auto Racing 

.S|ionsor: (iliarnpion Spark I'lu^ 

Company. 
Title: Rachifi Champions. 25 rniri. 

color, produced b\ l)\namic 

Films. Inc. 
-K During 1952. Dynamic Films 
kept a battery of cameramen busy 
shooting almost every second <tf 
some 18 racing events all over the 
country. Out of the miles of exciting 
footage that piled up. individual 
films were made for television show- 
ings of each event, and this new 
film, sponsored by Champion Spark 
Plug, recaps the highlights of the 
year's activities. 

It shows sequences of dirt track, 
sports car. stock, and boat races and 
championship events topped b\ the 
annual "500" at the Indianapolis 
Brickyard. 

Champion has no trouble "inte- 
grating" the commercial in this film, 
and there is remarkably little of it. 
for Champion plugs are almost 
standard equipment on racing cars 



221" — Guardian of America's Canine QuaUty 

The American Kennel 



and boats and the companv some- 
times sends along a mobile shop to 
lend a free hand to drivers and 
mechanics in getting the most out 
of their ignition systems. 

Final scene of the film shows the 
amazing ten car crash at the modi- 
fied stock event at Langhorne, Pa. 
From the appearance, it would seem 
that no such mayhem had ever been 
photographed — ten mangled coupes 
ivith fire sweeping all over them — 
but. luckily, not a driver was very 
seriouslv hurt. ff 



Sponsor 

Club. 
Title: 221. 28 min. color, produced 

by The Princeton Film Center, 

Inc. 
"K A German Shepherd dog breeder 
said the other day. "That darn 
AKC — took them three months 
once to register a litter I had. But 
I must admit they're getting better 
— only took them a couple of weeks 
on my last litter — and I guess they 
have got a lot to do.' 

The dog man didn't guess half 
of il. they've got more to do than 
most dog fans have any idea about. 
Every day at 221 Fourth Avenue 
in New York. 1500 to 2000 letters 
on average I it has gone to 6.(X)0 ) 
arrive concerning the problems and 
vital statistics of dog breeders and 
owners all over the country. 

While many dog people may 
think of the AKC's headquarters as 
a den of enthusiasts patting their 
pups as they leisurely answer cor- 
respondence, in reality, as the film 
shows, the AKC offices at "221" 
look more like the actuarial depart- 
ment of a big insurance firm. 

Every year, the Club registers 
some 315,000 newly whelped pure 



bred dogs. It sanctions shows, ap- 
points judges, keeps voluminous 
records and performs the legisla- 
tive and housekeeping tasks for the 
whole national dog world. The new 
film shows how this big "business" 
is conducted — how the dog owner 
and breeder are part of a pure 
democracy — the AKC is them and 
not a brass tower of edict dissemi- 
nators. 

221 shows this by running the 
camera around ."^KC headquarters, 
looking at elected delegate and 
board meetings, and getting away 
from "business " and out where dogs 
are dogs, not statistics, to a beauti- 
ful scene of happy, xapping beagles 
chasing a rabbit. 

The members of the thousand or 
so local kennel clubs will squirm 
with delight at this sequence, but 
they will, more importantly, get a 
good look at how- their club oper- 
ates. 

AKC's new movie is not at all 
intended for the general public — 
just for the "iiimiediale' dog w-orld. 
Perhaps some day the AKC may 
use as pleasing a film technique in 
telling the interesting story of or- 
ganized dog societ\ for evervone. |3' 



52 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 




announces . . . 

3 brilliant new Pageant models 
. . . and a heavy-duty silent pro- 
jector for critical movie analysis 



The Pageant is the projector that has revolu- 
tionized l6mm. sound projection .,. the first 
compact projector with the optical and tonal 
excellence of full-scale 16mm. equipment... 
the first to offer permanent preluhricalion — an 
exclusive l6mm. feature that eliminates com- 
pUtely the chief causes of projector breakdowns! 

At just S400, the Pageant is still the economi- 
cal top-choice projector for average l6mm. 
sound-and-silent projection. But now from 
Kodak have come four more projectors — each 
"tailor-made" to meet a particular 16mm. pro- 
jection requirement. See your Kodak Audio- 
Visual Dealer about a demonstration — or use 
the check slip below for further information. 



NEW Kodaicope Pageant 
Protector, Model AV-071 
Pluf-40 Shutter A super-brilliani 
version of the standard Pageant, 
it incorporates an extremely ef- 
ficiem two-bladed shutter which 
provides vastly increased iltumina- 



ihe 



l?o greater than 
ent projector. 
1 under difficult 
hard-todarken 



long screen "throws." or unusually 
targe picture areas are required. 
$400. Sount/ projection only. 



ith 15- 



NEW Kodaicope Pa 
Protector, Model AV- 
watt omptifler Features an extreme- 
ly high-fidelity amplifier, the extra 
capacity of the 12-inch Kodak 
De Luxe Speaker, and provision 
ound fidelity ob- 



tainable 

and'!p« 
um project 
bass, treble, 



able 






an . . . plus separate 
and fidelity controls 
ed sound quality in 



Sounti-anti-uUnI projection. 



Projector, Model AV-ISIE, with 
Plu*-40 Shutter and 15-wot1 am- 
plifier Combines increased light 
ouipui produced by Kodak's Plus- 
40 Shutter with the precise tone 
and %olurae features of the Model 
AV-151. No other portable pro- 
jeaor gives you such brilliant 

plus such excellent tonal quality 
at all Nolume levels. The Pageant. 
Model AV-151E. is capable of 



\6n 







r projei 
With Daylight Proie. 
;ion Viewer, for desk-top 
study. S295. SiienI projection 



Prices subject to change without notice 

For top sound coverage in acoustically 
difficult locations, you can step up volume 
wiihout distortion with the inexpensive 
Kodak Multi-Speaker Unit ... 3 addi- 
tional speakers in matching case. Simply 
plug into any Pageant. 

MOTION-PICTURE PROJECTORS 

for every audio-visual need 



EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY, Rochester 4, N. Y. 

Mease send name of nearest Kodak Audio-Visual Dealer, Complete infor- 
mation on equipment checked: ZJ Standard Pageant Z Pageant Model 
Pageant Model AV-151 U Pageant Model AV-ISIC A 



AV-071 

D Kodascope Analyst 

NAME. 



COMPANY. 
STREET 




a Kodak Multi-Speaki 

.POSITION 



NUMBER 3 • \ O 1, I M K 14 



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Drslfin,;! U, !,<■ prnrliral „n,l i,l,asinf-— 



/^NE of the must useful types of 
^-^ rooms for the business film 
executive is the combination office 
or conference room with complete 
built-in screening facilities. This 
arrangement pro\ides very ade- 
quate room for accomodating from 
8 to 10 viewers in comfort, yet, at 
the touch of a button, can be con- 
verted to an office for ordinarv 
business purposes. 

One of the best of such combina- 
tion rooms is in the offices of Rob- 
ert Yarnall Richie Productions in 
New '\ ork. It was planned from 
the start to sacrifice nothing in the 
way of picture or sound quality, yet. 
at the same time, to give the ap- 
pearance of an attractive business 
office, one of several in the Richie 
studios. 

The room measures 12 by 20 
feet, is panelled with acoustic ma- 
terial and contains six leather sec- 
tional chairs, a desk and a low ''cof- 
fee" table. At the rear of the room 
is a slit in the wall for projection 
which measures 36 inches wide bv 
6 inches high and is covered by 
plate glass and by a sliding wood 
panel, cut to fit. which matches 
a larger panel going across the 
back of the room. 

Behind the rear wall is a pro- 
jection booth, containing complete 
Bell & Howell projection equip- 
ment and reached by a door from 
the hall. Speaker cords from the 
booth run behind the baseboards to 
a permanent Bell & Howell 25 watt 
Orchestracon speaker mounted diag- 
onally on the wall at a front cor- 
ner. Plans are now being made to 
run controls from the room to the 
booth to permit stopping and start- 



ing the projector and controlling 
the sound level. These controls, 
which would operate selsyn motors 
in the booth, may be placed in a 
small end table and be simply plug- 
ged into wall connections. The 
room is air-conditioned and all floor 
and desk lamps can be controlled 
from the room or the booth and 
dimmed before the show. 

At the front of the room a Da- 
lite Electrol screen is installed in a 
cornice above full length windows. 
Push buttons beside the desk lower 
and raise the .screen electrically and 
also close draperies behind the 
.'creen which shut out the light. 

The electric screen and draperv 
system was installed in 1948 and 
to date has operated perfectly and 
needed no service. The drapes are 
of a tight weave material available 
from any store in a great variety of 
colors and patterns and lined with 
regular decorator's lining and inter- 
lined with cheap black cotton cloth. 
The draperies overlap about 18 
inches and are completely light- 
proof. 

The "coffee" table, which meas- 
ures about 2 by '.i feet on top, was 
specially constructed with a trans- 
lucent top and built-in lighting for 
viewing transparencies. 

The Richie staff' has found the 
room to meet its needs perfectly. It 
is used as a personal office, which 
gives no impression of being a 
screening room, by one of the ac- 
count executives, and also as a de- 
luxe and comfortable small theatre 
for clients. It is estimated that an 
office of this size can be converted 
into a combination room for about 
81,500, exclusive of projection. ^ 



Dual -Purpose Preview Room 



KlCIllE PKOUl CTlO.N.s .SETS LP KFKECTIN K 
CONFERKNCE-SCREE.MNG ROOM IN NEW YORK 



Till-; PicTlKK ILKFT) SlKiws ill,- r.iniimcl. yet cnmjorlahlr arrannement oj 
n anoti small screening room uliirli meets the needs oj Rulierl Ynrnall 
Kirliie staffers in New York. Plan hehu shows dflnil oj these arrange- 
tnenls on llie iisnni qiiarler-ineh scale. 




S GREEN 



COI\/TROL TOR. 
SCREEN 



D E 5 1^ 





SLIDIMa PAf-JEl- 

-^ 



^H= 



PI?OJ6CTOR- 



S T f< A E 



54 



BUSINESS SCREEN M A G .\ Z 1 N E 



e^aateiS^S«iB^SiKS^«giWB8!«!S^s»sf«t:i^lS^ 




It documents our 
complete 16mm laboratory- 
services and indicates 
the cost of each. 

We offer all 

the resources of a 

professional laboratory, 

fully equipped and staffed 

to achieve the highest 

possible quality in color 

or black and white. 



L. 



ave 



}u this 
Price List 
on your 
Desk?" 



McGeary-Sm ith 
Laboratories Inc. 



meqeart/-smM /aoora/or/es. //ic. 



'cOi 



/ 



1905 FAIRVIEW AVENUE, N.E. • WASHINGTON 2, D. C. 
phone LAWRENCE 6-4634 



NON-COMPETITIVE SERVICE TO THE PRODUCER 



NUMBER 3 • VOLUME 14 • 1953 




Recriitinc. Younfi men 
new .miilieuleil sliilellln 



«/ ,l,is 



The Variety Store Industry Meets 
Manpower Challenge with Film 

♦ Recognizing that many young 
men are unaware of the career op- 
portunities in its growing, three 
billion dollar industry, variety store 
companies have joined in sponsor- 
ing Opportunity in Variety Store 
Management. The color sound slide- 
film tells what abilities and traits 
are necessary to get ahead in the 
industry and gives a realistic de- 
scription of the trainees job. the 
manager's duties and responsibili- 
ties and the rewards of success. 

A list of the sponsors can be ob- 
tained from the film's producer. 
Merchandiser Film Productions, 
192 Lexington Avenue, New York. 
The film is available on free loan 
from any of the sponsors. 

Five Star Productions' TV Spot 
Receives American Heritage Award 

♦ Five Star Prodi ctions of Holly- 
wood has received a special award 
from the American Heritage Foun- 
dation for its filmed TV spot See 
You at the I'olls contributed to the 
Advertising Council prior to the 
presidential election. The Founda- 
tion awards committee was under 
the chairmanship of Charles E. Wil- 
son. 

All costs of writing, art work. 
photography and editing of the one- 
minute spot were donated by Five 
Star. Talent for the sound track 
was contributed by AFR.\ members. 
A survey conducted by the Founda- 
tion estimated that there were more 
than 1,000 broadcasts of See You at 
the Polls. 

Combined Jewish Appeal Film Wins 
Award for Interpretive Theme 

♦ A Single I oice, sound and color 
motion picture which tells the story 
of the Combined Jewish Appeal of 
Greater Boston, was called an out- 
standing interpretive film at the 21st 
annual General Assembly of thf- 
Council of Jewish Federation-^ and 
Welfare Funds. 

Displayed before the nation's la\ 
leaders of Jewish federations as 
well as the professional publicists, 
the film was described bv the au- 




In the 



NEWS ABOUT FILMS AND PRODUCTION TECHNIQUES 



(lience as the finest film of its kind 
|]roduccd by a major Jewish com- 
munity in this country. The film 
won a Council of Jewish Federa- 
tions and Welfare Funds certificate 
of award for "excellency as an out- 
standing documentary." 

A Single Voice depicts the diver- 
sified services available to the Jew- 
ish community of Greater Boston 
through the Associated Jewish Phil- 
anthropies. The works of many na- 
tional agencies are included, and a 
special section depicts current 
U.J.A. activities in Israel. 

The film was produced without 
professional actors by the Master 
Motion Picture Company. Boston. 



Board of Fire Underwriters Wins 
Four 1953 Safely Film Awards 

♦ K.piir irijiun films produced last 
year by the National Board of Fire 
Underwriters have won Awards of 
Merit in the 105.3 safety film contest 
sponsored by the National Safetv 
Council through its National Com- 
mitlec on Films for Safety. 

If hat to Do Until the Fire Depart- 
ment Arrives. Ilnw to Cail the Fire 
Department and Stupiii Careless- 
ness, the Fire Clown received awards 
in the non-theatrical class of general 
subjects. In the non-theatrical home 
instructional division. How to Fight 
Fire in the Kitchen won an award. 

Lnifilms. Inc. produced the color 



DE FRENES 




^€^m 



9^^m^ 



1909 BUTTON WOOD STREET -PHILA. 30, PA. 
RIttenhouse 6-1686 



35 MM -16 MM -COLOR- BLACK & WHITE 



SOUND 




SYSTEM 



liliri. Stupid Carelessness, and the 
I'liicr three were made in black and 
uliite by Jerry Fairbanks. Inc. 
.Sri|)ts for all four were written by 
J. Wendell Sether. Board director 
of public information. 

All four films are fi\e minutes 
long and were intended primarily 
for television, but are available for 
showing in schools, clubs and indus- 
lr\ . Prints nia\' be booked free of 
charge by writing to the National 
Board of Fire I'nderwriters Film 
lil)rar\. V?, East .37lh Street, New 
'(ork 17. 



Aetna "Good Housekeeping" Film 
Continues Building Industries Series 

* .A new motion picture that shows 
how good housekeeping improves 
efficiency in the building industry 
had its premiere showing at a meet- 
ing of the accident prevention com- 
mittee of the Associated General 
Contractors of America March 20 
at the organizations annual meeting 
at the McAllister Hotel in Miami, 
Florida. 

Entitled Good Housekeeping — 
For Men Only, the movie is the third 
in a series of safety films dealing 
with the construction industry to be 
])roduced by the .VAna Casualty and 
Surety Company as a part of the 
company's loss prevention program. 

In the thirteen-minute film, the 
recommended housekeeping prac- 
tices for the building industry are 
woven around the story of a con- 
struction superintendent who over- 
comes the delays and difficulties of 
a previous job by instituting a good 
housekeeping program on his next 
project. 

Produced in full color, the movie 
is designed particularly for showing 
to supervisory personnel and stresses 
the theme that "good housekeeping 
should start with the clearing of the 
site and end onlv when the job is 
done." 

In scenes from actual construc- 
[Min jobs, the film illustrates correct 
methods of storing bagged material, 
lumber, bricks and explosives; ar- 
rangement of storage space to make 
supplies readily available as the 
work progres.ses: erecting, stripping 
and storing forms; precautions to 
be observed around walkways and 
fioor openings and near open walls; 
regulating the flow' of materials to 
working platfonns; use of clean-up 
crews lo improve efficiency and re- 
duce accidents; and the proper in- 



56 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



slallalion of temporary eltilrir wir- 
ing. 

The new film, scheduled for re- 
lease in April, can be obtained with- 
out charge for showings through 
the A.tnas public education depart- 
ment at Hartford. Conn., or the 
company's local representatives 
throughout the country. 



New Safety Picture Contrasts 
Industry With Amusement Pork 

* Ju?t about the lime fun-seekers 
begin pouring into the nation's 
amusement parks, the National 
Safety Council will release its new 
Sarra-produced motion picture. 
Saje As ) ou Make It — a safety film 
built around the amusement park 
theme. 

Filmed at Chicago's Riverview 
Park, reportedly the world's largest. 
Saje As You Make It contrasts the 
apparently ""dangerous " rides in the 
park against the ""safe-looking" 
everyday things people do. 

■"Step right up. " says the com- 
pelling voice of a barker, ""enjoy 
the thrills and chills of each elec- 
trif)in". spine-tinglin' ride!" 

Doubtful Dan. however, a tvpica 
plant worker spending the day in 
the park, is far from sold on the 
idea. The rides just look too dan- 
gerous to him — he wouldn't ride em 
in a million years! 

Thus the barker, wise to both the 
wa\s of the park and what goes on 
outside of it. becomes the narrator 
for this ten-minute safety film. In 
essence, his message says: "Some- 
times things that look dangerous 
can be made very safe — while 
things that look easy and simple, 
often turn out to be very unsafe. " 

In addition to scenes photo- 
graphed at the amusement park, 
scenes depicting industrial accident 
hazards were staged at the Proviso 
Yards of the Chicago and North- 
western Railroad. 

The new safetv movie was devel- 
oped under the supervision of 
Charles Alexander, manager, and 
Ko\ Benson, assistant manager of 
the industrial division of the Na- 
tional Safety Council. 

."Script for the film and direction 
of industrial sequences was by 
\^'a\ ne A. Langston of Sarra's crea- 
li\e staff. The Riverview sequences 
were directed by Marvin Bailey. 
The film is being produced under 
the supervision of Joseph (i. Betzer. 
ilirector of film planning, and 
Harry W. Lange. production man- 
ager of Sarra's Chicago studios. 

Distribution of Saje As You 
Make ll will be handled through 
the National Safety Council. 425 
-North Michigan Avenue. Chicago 
11. Illinois. S- 




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send your order to Color Reproduction Company of 
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FOR BETTER SHOWS USE THE AUDIO-VISUAL PROJECTIONISTS HANDBOOK 
♦ Many large U.S. business firms now use the manual contains step-by.stcp lessons on good show- 



.\udio-Visual Projectionist's Handbook to train 
employee projectionists. This graphic illustrated 



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Order toda\ from BlsiNKSs ScREKN, Chicago 26. 



N IM B E R 3 ' \ L UM E H 



USING ■REPF.TITIVK IMI'ACT" TO \1 \KK VISIM. TH \IM\(; MOKK KmXTIVF. 

Socony Improves on Loop Film Technique 

SERIES OF SHORT •LOOP" FILMS HELPS S I ATION ATTE.NDAxNTS 
IX SALES AND SERVICE TRAIMXC PROGRAM NOW IN WIDE T'SE 



THE Socony-Vaclt'm Oil Company is util- 
izing a new system of \isiial training called 
llie "loop"" technique. Developed liy Captain 
Vi illiam C. Eddy. USN during World War II and 
now further developed by Seminar Films, of New 
\ ork. the system consists, mechanically, of a set 
of cartridges loaded with short films that may be 
run continuously on any make of projector. 

But the loop technique is nmch more than a 
new type of equipment. Its whole philosophy of 
teaching is different from that customarilv em- 
ployed in visual training. The loop system shuns 
any semblance to the world of the theatre. It 
abjures the '"establishing" shot, the darkened 
screening room and. in fact, all dramatic tech- 
niques usually associated with the "movies." 
Practitioners of film loop training believe that 
the theatrical aspects of training films introduce 
a passive mental state in trainees which is unde- 
sirable and they seek instead to make students 
actually take part in tlie training during the 
screening and not afterwards, from memory. 
First to L^se Technique Broadly 
Before Socony-Vacuum, the first industrial 
firm to use the technique on a wide scale, began 
its film loop training program early this vear. the 
loop system had proved to be most successful in 
teaching languages, and a fibu loop version of 
Seminar's picture on the back pressure-arm lift 
method of artificial respiration was being used 
in some industrial plants and is the standard 
teaching aid on artificial respiration at plants of 
the United States Steel Company. 

In these cases, the film loop system is used to 
teach basic skills. The artificial respiration film, 
for instance, has nothing about why the new sys- 
tem is used, no dramatic preparatory scenes 
showing why the victim needs aid. it just shows 
how to perform the life saving respiratory treat- 
ment, without ramifications, with long silences 
in the film, but with constant rhythm so trainees 
may practice artificial respiration over and over 
while the film is going on. 

Used to Improve Sales Coniniunicalion 
Socony-Vacuum's use of the loop technique is 
different in that it involves not manual skills or 
completely new verbal skills, but salesmanship. 
Company training officials are convinced that 
much of the success of selling is determined by 
the basic ability to communicate and the current 
Socony-Vacuum loop training campaign is de- 
signed to bring out this often latent talent. 

Here's how the Socony-Vacuum training pro- 
gram works: In Loop #1, the camera is inside 
a car parked at a gas pump. It focuses directly 
on the attendant who is servicing the car. The 
attendant, speaking directly to the camera as if 
to a customer, makes his sales pitch about service 
he has observed is necessary for the c^r. He goes 
through his talk in about a minute. This film is 



sho»n five or six times until all detail? of the 
attendants words and action arc familiar to the 
trainees. 

Second Film Delivers the Message 
In Loop #2, the same film is shown, again 
repeatedly, with the same action and the same 
words, but superimposed on the screen are 
printed words which form the basis of Soconv- 
Vacuum's new Lets Sell sales campaign. In suc- 
cession, as the attendant performs his ser\ices. 
are the words Observe, Explain and Solicit. One 
minute may not seem very long, as films go. to 
show a typical sales presentation from beginning 
to end, but a minute is longer than it seems, and 
few station attendants get longer than that to 
attempt any selling. 

By this time, the trainees have watched the 
attendant go through his sales talk from 10 to 12 
times and they have seen the logical sequence of 
actions that make up a successful sale. During the 
last two or three runs, the sales trainer shuts off 
the sound and queries the men on what the 
attendant is doing. Of course, the trainees darn 
well know what the man is doing and saying after 
watching him nine or ten times, but the question 
is a prelude to the next step — that of bringing the 
men directly into the act. 

Service station men have a great variety of 
customers they must "take on"' during the day. 
No two are alike and sales techniques must be 
different for each one. In Loop ^3, the camera 
is outside the car and focussed on a typical 
Mobilgas customer. This time, it is the customer 
who does the talking, making mild objections to 
spending more for additional services. 

Interspersed in the film, and separated from 




Loop Film Magaei.ne is easily attached 
to standard 16mm sound film projector 
as shown in illustration ahoie. 



the customer's speech are silent periods marked 
at beginning and end by a bell. During these 
periods, trainees have an opportunity to try to 
convince him that he does need extra service. 
Speaking right back to the customer on the 
-I reen. the attendants, in turn, try to make the 
>ales and counter the customers objections. They 
talk in a normal speaking voice, without micro- 
phone, in as close an assimilation of the actual 
sales situation as possible. 

Trainers have also experimented with the tech- 
nique by jnounting the screen in a car window, 
but it has been found that this bit of "realism" 
doesn't make the situation more real at all — • 
merely adds an unnecessar\' and actually dis- 
tracting prop. 

At first, as Socony-Vacuum has discovered, 
some of the men ha\e stage fright — they're 
tongue-tied, confused. All this is unimportant — 
it's a new technique, no one is familiar with it. 
and there is plenty of time for ironing out mis- 
takes. What the loop technique does is get them 
to say something, which, as most sales managers 
know, is half the battle. Too many service sta- 
tion attendants are quite content to pump the 
gas, point out the washroom and collect the 
money — period. Socony-Vacuum's looped films 
expect to find these men and inculcate a habit 
of forming the right words — convincingly, if 
possible, but to say them anyw'ay. 

How Do You Handle This Customer? 

Loop #4 presents a harder sales challenge. A 
garrulous old lady is the customer, and she is 
sure her car will last for years and run perfectly, 
presumable without service. It is an interesting 
thing that from any point of the room, the old 
lady is looking right at each man. and not merely' 
"looking"' but consciously listening to what he 
has to say. This is called ""dynamic listening" and 
its a difficult thing to find actors who can do it 
properly. Each man has a chance to match his 
salesmanship against the old lady, and at the end 
of the loop each time is the question — Sold? 
The group decides whether she bought the service 
by voice vote. 

Loop ip5 introduces the hard guy: "Look, 
chum, just put the gas in!" The men get half a 
minute to bring him around a bit while the tough 
face glares at them from the screen. Then he 
says, "'\^Tiat makes you think I want to spend the 
money? ' Another chance to work up an answer. 
Finally, the mug says, "Makes sense, but some 
other time." And the men got one more chance 
to work him up to a sale. 

Training Films They Really Enjoy 
Loop #6 is similar to #5, but the customer 
this time is a very attractive blonde. The point 
here might be to make sales instead of making 
time. Socony- Vacuums Loop training is carried 
on more in the manner of a good, jovial and 
productive bull session rather than as any cut 
and dried exposition of sales techniques. The 
guys are supposed to enjoy tliem as well as to 
take home some useful dope to try out on the 
service court. 

One of the advantages of the loop technique, 
Socony-Vacuum has found, is the simplicity with 
which it may be set up — physically. The IV2 to 
2 minute films are each packed in individual 
cartridges and simply attached to any make of 
(concluded o.\ pace seventy-six) 



58 



ItlSlNE.s.S SCREEN .MAGAZINE 




Modulite Model "S" 16mm 
variable-area soundon-film 
recording Galvanometer with 
"Shutter" Noise Reduction 
now available as optional 
equipment on the Auricon 
"Super 1200" and the 
"AuriconPro" Cameras, and 
the Auricon RT-80 Double 
System Recorder. 

■^t HiEh-fidellty soundtrack with 
16 DB noise reduction. 

■^ Soundtrack always ru 
centered on projector photoc 
scanning beam, for crisp and cl 
sound-track reproduction. 

■H Only one audio-modulaled 

soundtrack edge, eliminates 

Gamma Icontrast; effects and 

minimizes "Eberhard Effect" and 

■ Mackie Line "troubles experienced 

with multiple-track variable-arej 

recording. 

■♦c Audio galvanometer and 

shutter -noise -reduction 

galvanometer are independent 

preventing noise-reduction-bi,5s 

cross-talk distortion on soumi 

track. 

■♦t Rugged. Can be overloadei: 

without danger. 

■^ Tested and now being used 
by leading Studios and Televisicn 
Stations. 



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Detailed here are two of the remarkable technical developments built into the new Auricon 
'Super 1200" SoundOn-Film Recording Camera. The unique Modulite Variable-Area Sound-Track 
with "Shutter" Noise Reduction, described at left, and the new Reflex 
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"Self Blimping ' for studio work, 33 minutes continuous film 
capacity. Variable Shutter, and other professional features, 
have prompted Producers and Cameramen to name the 
Super 1200 . . ."Finest 16 mm Sound Camera ever built!" 

Priced complete for Optical Sound-On-Film Recording, at 
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MANUFACTURERS OF SOUND-ON-FILM RECORDING EQUIPMENT SINCE 1931 




N L .M B F. R 3 




The CoDinercial Newsreel 



NEW SPONSORED FILM PROGRAMS OF THE CURRENT PERIOD 



iiii^l 



Sarra's Heten Krujika (extreme right) 
scripled ihe neu iVIagic Chej sV.<ielil,n 
(see hehu). 



Magic Chef Electric Ranges 
Make Sales Debut in Sarra Film 

♦ In making its entry into the elec- 
tric range field. Magic Chef. Inc.. 
world's largest maker of gas ranges, 
is using a new all-color sound slide- 
film produced by Sarra. Inc. to 
acquaint dealers and distributors 
with features of its new electric 
models. 

Entitled The \eii Magic Chej 
Electric Range, the fibn has been 
premiered before Magic Chef sales 
personnel in Newark. Cleveland. At- 
lanta, and St. Louis, and nation- 
wide showings of the new 24-minule 
film before other Magic Chef sales 
personnel and distributors will be 
held as the new electric range pro- 
gram gathers momentum. 

The film was produced by the 
Chicago studios of Sarra, Inc. 
through Krupnick & Associates. Inc., 
St. Louis. Missouri, advertising 
agency. 

Designed as a four part presenta- 
tion, the film uses a cartoon treat- 
ment to dramatize the wide-spread 
consumer demand that led to the 
new Magic Chef electric range — 
termed ""the company s most import- 
ant new product development." ac- 
cording to Arthur Stockstrom. pres- 
ident. 

The range itself and its many 
diversified features are then pre- 
sented in a newsreel sequence. Part 
Three of the film presents different 
cooking demonstrations to show 
sales personnel the wide range of 
cooking operations that can be per- 
formed, the ease of use. and the 
resultant homemaker satisfaction. 
Final porti<ui of the film is devoted 
to a brief dramatization of the sales 
opportunities that exist in the new 
line of five "electra-magic" models. 

Distribution of the film will be 
made through Magic Chef. Inc.. St. 
Louis, Missouri. 

Robert Lawrence Productions 
Filming "Vacationland America" 

♦ A Robert Lawrence Prodi c- 



^n^^ , ,,■« i> ill l;..>l..n llllilln;; liu- 
Ihirleinth program in the i uculion- 
Idiiil America television film series 
lor the Frani Corporation. The pro- 
gram, which stars John Cameron 
Swayze and his family, appears on 
11! I . S. slations. 

Film Series on Philadelphia 

♦ News Reel Lmuikuohv. 1733 
.Sansoni Street in Philadelphia, has 
begun production on a series of 
16mm sound and color films for 
the City of Philadelphia. The first. 
I'liitailelphia — The City With Opet^ 
Arms, will describe the attractions 
of Philadelphia for out-of-town vis- 
itors — tourists, convention groups 
and others. 



Tin- sccchhI IiImi. ,-iilillc,l l'l„ta,lcl- 
phia Giants .'Hung The Ueliiiiare. 
will give a graphic picture of ihi- 
booming expansion which has 
transformed the Delaware Valley 
into one of the world's mightiest 
industrial areas. The final film of 
the series. I'hiladc'ihia — Birthplace 
<)j Our .\ntion. will take the visitor 
on a walking tour of the historic 
treasure spots of old Philadel|ihia. 
The three pictures will be under 
the executive production supervi- 
sion of Louis W. Kellman of News 
Reel Laboratory. Paul Wendkos will 
write and direct, and there will be 
two photography units, under John 
Burke and Morris Kellman respec- 
tivelv. 



o o o o 





brochure describing what 

tor correction 

motion picture production. 



V W .i;v (.wmlin^l .l,„s ,„ nne 

■e.l dire, led In .\ ,K/inn /ut/.er I lei I J 
und nnw in prudmlion at H\ni,nii, Films. 

Video Series Stars Monty Wooley 
And Production by Dynamic Films 

♦ DMiamic Films. Inc. is at work 
nn a ntw series of television pro- 
grams. On Stage uilh Monly Wool- 
ley, which will be handled bv the 
W illiani .Morris Agencv. 

The show, which is being directerl 
b\ Dynamic's Nathan Zucker. com- 
bines the informal atmosphere of a 
dramatic reading with the greater 
range of a realistic dramatic per- 
formance. 

Two shows ha\e becM completed. 
Pot's The Cask- of Amnntillailo. and 
Chekhov's The Boor. 

Ideal Pictures Will Distribute 
Wheeler's "Selling the Sizzle" 

♦ Ideal Pictire.s Corporation 
has announced that it has acquired 
the exclusive rental rights for El- 
mer Wheeler's sales training film 
.Celling the Sizzle I Bi siNESS Screen. 
Vol. 13. No. 81. 

I he 30-minute 16mm sound and 
Kilor film, produced by Fotovox. 
Inc.. is two complete films in one. 
The first 20 minutes are devoted to 
the explanation and application of 
Wheeler's five super-sales points. 
"Mr. Salesman.' as Wheeler is 
called, points out that these five 
points are the basis for all success- 
ful selling. 

The second portion of the film 
shows how the Wheeler techniques 
are applied to the selling of a spe- 
cific product. Altogether it is a 
noteworthy film for its humorous, 
urbane approach to a subject usual- 
l\ presented in a desk-thumping, 
dry manner. 

.Sales managers, sales organiza- 
tions aiul other interested groups 
nia\ rent the film from any Ideal 
branch, or by contacting the com- 
panv's home office. 65 E. South Wa- 
ter Street. Chicago I. Previews of 
the film ran be arranged. 

Names Golden Gate Office 

♦ Klinc Stldios has announced 
appointment of The Downey Com- 

pan\ as San Francisco representa- 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 




Off course he's using Soundcraft Recording Tape 



Perfect reproduction — that's the 
reason why more and more engineers 
toflay demand Soundcraft 
Professional Uecortlinj? Tape. 

Soundcraft is the only professional 
tape that is Micro-Polished. The only 
tape that is polished, buffed and 
re-polished by a special process to 
produce a surface that is mirror- 
smooth, completely free of even the 
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Lower distortion 

Uniformity of output 

Improved high frequency response 

IJetter head contact 

I.*ss friction, longer head life 



•PATENT APPLIED FOR 



Soundcraft Professional liecording 
Tape incorporates all the features 
developed by Soundcraft research 
engineers during the last two years: 
pre-coating to insure better adhesion 
prevent curling and cupping — 
dry lubrication to eliminate squeals. 
The 7 reel has the 2'i' hub, 
eliminating torque pn)blems and 
resulting in better timing. All this 
plus a splice-free guarantee on all 
1200' and 2500' reels. 

Why settle for less than the best ? 
Ne.xt time, insist on Soundcraft 
Professional Recording Tape. 
It's Micro-Polished! 




REEVES 



WRITE FO« fREf INFORMATION — DEPI G 



SOUNDCRAFT 



CORP. 

10 East 52nd Sircel, N. Y 22, N Y. 



N U M II K R ,1 



\ (I I. 1 \I K. II 



lAVA Annual Meclin^: 

(Cd.NTINL'F.D FROM PACK 3 "J I 
cording for Promotional and Slide- 
film Use." 

An important resolution defining 
lAVA's membership policy was 
unanimously adopted in the closing 
hours of these sessions. Key points 
in the resolution were as folloivs: 

(a) that membership be limited 
to the three eligibility requirements 
spelled out in the constitution . . . 

(b) that persons recommended 
for membership be given prefer- 
ence who have a broad and work- 
ing interest in audio-visual media 
and that if a firm has a high degree 
of specialization in the audio-visual 
field, nmltiple membership for the 
firm be permissible. 

U) that persons reconmiended 
for membership devote a significant 
proportion of their time in the 
practical work of creating, using, 
circulating, or producing audio- 
visual materials. 

(dj that persons recommended 
for membership be given preference 
who have a high degree of profes- 
sional responsibility in the audio- 
visual field and who can contribute 
most to the professional stature of 
the association. 

(e) that the philosophy of the 
association is NOT to attain a large, 
unwieldy membership but is to 
maintain a close working group 
who can help most to raise the pro- 
fessional status of all of its mem- 
bers, even though regional groups 
may be necessary to serve best 
those who are duly qualified for 
membership. 

Fall Meeting in Pittsburgh 
lAVA members in Pittsburgh 
will play host at the annual Fall 
meeting of the association to be held 
October 13, 1-1 and 15 in that city. 
Facilities of the Aluminum Com- 
pany of America, Westinghouse, 
and United States Steel will be 
utilized for the three-day program. 
Ray Roth of U. S. Steel was named 
chairman of the fall program. ^' 

Completes Shooting Script for 
Chambersburg Engineering Picture 

♦ Free lance screen writer Newton 
E. Meltzer has completed the 
shooting script for The Hammer 
Builders to be produced for Cham- 
bersburg Engineering Corp. by 
Wilbur Streech Productions, of 
New York. Meltzer is currently at 
work on Questions and Anstiers 
for the American Petroleum Insti- 
tute under the supervision of Film 
Counselors, Inc. 

The Chambersburg film is sched- 
uled for industry release before 
early fall. 



Background on Film Research 

Abstract Review of Latest of Navy Film Research Publirations 



Instruction Film Kesearcli (Rapid 
Mass Learning I 1918-1950 by 
Drs. Hoban and \an Ormer. 
Dept. of Conunerce Pub. No. 
111000 (S2.50) 
♦ Over 200 experimental and sur- 
vey studies were made on the edu- 
cational influences and effectiveness 
of motion pictures up to 1950. It 
is important for film producers and 
users to know what kind of research 
has been done and what valid con- 
clusions can be derived from the 
mass of accumulated research data. 
Film Research 1918-1950 brings 
together in one source the findings 
growing out of these many widely 
scattered investigations in instruc- 
tional motion pictures over a 30 



Near period. The authors have sum- 
marized, evaluated, and integrated 
three decades of film research, and 
they have conscientiously provided 
their interpretation of this research, 
leading to their tentative, but im- 
portant, statement of principles of 
film influence. 

The work is aimed at answering 
two basic questions: "What do we 
know with reasonable certainty 
about the influence of motion pic- 
tures on the behavior of people? 
What does the film research of the 
past 30 years add up to?" 

The plan of this research survey 
is oriented toward four major ele- 
ments that are involved in the in- 



DISCIPLINE DOESN'T 
HAVE TO HURT!!! 



Do your supervisors enforce painful disci- 
pline ... or fair, understanding and impar- 
tial discipline? 

Effective discipline is of vital importance 
to your business. It's the lubricant that will 
give you a smooth-running organization. 

Show your supervisors the proved tech- 
niques of: 

"MAINTAINING DISCIPLINE" 

one of the sound slidefihiis in the outstand- 
ing eight-part visual course SUPERVISOR 

TR.4INING ON HUMAN RELATIONS. 

You may obtain a preview without obliga- 
tion. 

ADDRESS RfQUCSTS TO: 



structional effectiveness of motion 
pictures: 

1. The objective for which a film 
is produced. 

2. The characteristics of the audi- 
ence (which influence reaction to 
a film and affect the degree to which 
objectives are realized). 

3. The content and -truclure 
(treatment) of the film itself. 

4. The context in which the film 
is presented. 

Research data reviewed by the 
authors are discussed in the re- 
port so as to emphasize these four 
factors. The report devotes succes- 
sive chapters to major film re- 
search programs in the U. S.; to 
research involving three broad 
kinds of instructional objectives for 
films (i.e. teaching a knowledge of 
facts, teaching perceptual - motor 
skills, and influencing attitudes, mo- 
tivation and opinions) : to compari- 
sons of the instructional value of 
films with other media and meth- 
ods; to audience characteristics 
(both individual and social I : and 
to variables in the production and 
utilization of films. The final chap- 
ter formulates a series uf "prin- 



6108 SANTA MONiCA BLVD. cfe^^-^' HOLLYWOOD 38, CALIFORNIA 



EDITOR'S NOTE 

* In past issues Blsixess 
Screen" has reported a number 
of film research studies conduct- 
ed by the Instructional Film Re- 
search Program at The Penn- 
sylvania State College. The In- 
structional Fihn Research Pro- 
gram is sponsored jointly by 
the Department of the Army and 
the Department of Navy through 
the Office of Naval Research, 
Special Devices Center. Dean M. 
R. Trabue is the responsible ad- 
ministrator for the Program and 
C. R. Carpenter is the Director. 
Reported briefly here is a ma- 
jor Instructional Film Research 
Program study of considerable 
significance to all persons seri- 
ously concerned with motion pic- 
ture communication. The work 
of Drs. Hoban and van Ormer is 
much more than a reference work 
of collected research abstracts: 
it is a penetrating attempt to 
evaluate the motion picture re- 
search of the past thirty years 
and to deduce from it tentative 
working principles which can be 
applied by intelligent film pro- 
ducers and users today. 

Film Research 1918.1950 is 
available from the Department 
of Commerce, ODice of Technical 
Services, Washington 25. D. C. 
The Department of Conunerce 
Publication Number is 111 000. 
Cost is S2.50 per copy. W< 



62 



BUSINESS SCREEN .MAGAZINE 



ciphs of film influence" with speci- 
fic practical implications for edu- 
cators, film producers, and users 
of films. 

In preparing the report, more 
than 200 available research studies 
were examined. These were sub- 
jected to a critical evaluation of 
both their experimental design and 
the reliability of the data from 
which conclusions were drawn. 

The report contains a glossary 
of statistical and psychological 
terms to help non-technical readers. 
It includes an extensive bibliogra- 
phy of film research studies and 
contains chapter summaries for 
busy film makers and users. 

The authors express the hope that 
the work will be useful to educa- 
tors and sponsors in more accurate- 
ly predicting the results of film in- 
struction, to film producers in im- 
proving the planning and produc- 
tion of effective instructional films, 
and to film users in increasing the 
effectiveness of film utilization pro- 
cedures. As a guide for continued 
systematic inquiry into theoretical 
and practical problems of film com- 
munication the work of Drs. Ho- 
ban and van Ormer should be in- 
valuable. 1' 



Cinema Research Makes Ansco, 
Eastman Duplicate Color Negatives 

♦ Both Eastman and ,\nsco dupli- 
cate 35 mm. color negatives are 
being produced currently at 
Cinema Research Corporation, 
Hollywood. 

Thousands of dollars worth of ad- 
ditional equipment installed during 
the past year now make it possible 
for Cinema Research to turn out du- 
plicate negatives of uniform quality. 

The dupe negative color process 
involves making three separation 
master positives from the original 
negative, and, while maintaining 
strict control and color balance, re- 
combining the master positives into 
the duplicate negative, incorporat- 
ing the effects specified. 

While still a comparatively new 
field. Cinema Research has had 
more than a year's experience in 
the 35 mm. duplicate color negative 
process, with dozens of clients mak- 
ing use of this service. 



SPECIAL OPTICAL EFFECTS 
AND TITLES 

On tho "Fireside Theatre" TV Series 

by 
RAY MERCER & COMPANY 

4241 Normal Ave. • Hollywood 29, Calif. 

Send lor Free Optical Effects Chart 




VICTOR 
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When you buy a Victor Sound Projector, you can confidently look 
forward to extra years of trouble-free performance. So many Victor owners 
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which are still in first-class operating condition. 

There are several important reasons behind Victor dependability. First of 

all, Victor pioneered in 16mm — and for more than 40 years has devoted 

its time and effort almost entirely to the development and improvement 

of motion picture projectors and service. Victor Service Centers, staffed with 

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world to bring you better service and longer projector life. 




A BUSINESS FILM REFERENCE AND RESEARCH LIBIL\RY AT YOUR SERVICE 

Write today for complete details on the Film Guide services have now been improved to meet your needs. 
Library and the Business Film Bookshelf Services .Address: Film Guide Library. Business Screen. 7064 
available to subscribers. These economical reference Sheridan Rd., Chicago 26. \^'rite today — don t delay! 



NUMBER 3 • VOLUME 14 



63 



Television Network Is Extended 
To Bridgeport and Sioux City 

♦ TvMi iiKiri' liiexisidii sUUioiis luui' 
been atlHcd ti) the Hell TelcpliDiie 
System's nationwide network of 
television faeilitics. the Long Lines 
Department of the American Tele- 
phone and Telegraph Company an- 
nounced recently. These stations. 
WICC-TV in Bridgeport. Connecti- 
cut, and KVTV in Sioux City, Iowa, 
bring the total coverage to 81 cities 
and 126 television stations in the 
United States. 

Network programs are fed to 
Bridgeport from the New York- 
Boston radio-relay route and to 
Sioux City from the transcontinental 
radio relav system at Omaha. 



Film Series on World Problems 
Released Specifically for TV 

* An initial siries nf l.i ducurnen- 
tary films on world "problem spots" 
made in 26-minute lengths specifi- 
cally for television has been re- 
leased by British Information 
Services. 

In seven of the films Clete Rob- 
erts, international correspondent, 
asks an average American "'man in 
the street" what he knows about 
some troubled area, and how the 
problem there affects the L'nitcd 
States today. The films go on to 
give concise and picturesque an- 
swers to questions on Hong Kong. 
Malaya, Celon. New Zealand and 
other centers of trouble with inter- 
national implications. 

The other five subjects are more 
pe